Empathic Family & Parenting
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Empathic Family & Parenting
News from around the word about Empathic Parenting and Familly Life
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Movement Magazine: Empathic Family & Parenting

Empathy Movement Magazine:  Empathic Family & Parenting | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

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(Empathic Parenting) When Empathy Doesn't Work

(Empathic Parenting) When Empathy Doesn't Work | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
Rarely can a response make something better. What makes something better is connection.”                                    – Brené Brown, Ph.D. 

I once entered an elevator to the sounds of a crying infant. The mother faced forward and was holding the baby up to face the rear of the elevator. She was shifting her body from side to side and patting the baby’s back in an attempt to quiet her. I stood with my back at the rear of the elevator and turned my head to look at the baby’s face. The baby looked at me. “You seem upset,” I acknowledged, nodding slightly. The baby instantly stopped crying and stared at me with what looked like a mixture of relief and disbelief. (A story I shared in my post, “Baby Manipulator”)

Empathy can have a powerfully calming effect, particularly in the early years with children. I imagine that’s because our babies and toddlers are limited in their ability to communicate thoughts and emotions, so they’re not accustomed to feeling understood.

 

When that happens… Whoa! What a wonderful surprise! They not only feel heard and understood, but also have the reassurance from one of the extremely important adults in their lives that it’s perfectly okay for them to feel what they’re feeling. It’s no wonder empathy can make children feel instantly better.

Yet, for all the inspiring stories I hear from parents and professionals about the miraculous power of empathy, I also hear concerns about empathy not working. Here are the most common reasons empathy doesn’t work:

 

 BY JANET

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(Empathic Parenting)  3 Ways to Encourage Empathy in Kids

(Empathic Parenting)  3 Ways to Encourage Empathy in Kids | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Dr. Borba, an old friend of Parents who’s worked with schools around the world, has many specific suggestions for how we can help our children be kind and inclusive. “Before children can ‘step into someone’s shoes,’ they must first develop the ability to read nonverbal cues in facial expressions, gestures, posture, and voice tone,” she says.

 

Here are three ways to help.

 

Spend time with a baby. Observing an infant is a powerful way for your child to tune in to emotions.

 

Build a feeling vocabulary. The more of these words your child knows, the more savvy she’ll be about how other people are feeling: agreeable, apprehensive,...

 

Communicate face-to-face. Kids also learn to read someone’s emotions by making eye contact...

 

Diane Debrovner

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The Real Problem with Cyberbullying and How Parents Can Make It Stop

The Real Problem with Cyberbullying and How Parents Can Make It Stop | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
I recently interviewed Dr. Josh Straub. He’s a psychologist and leading expert on social media and the effect it’s having on our kids. One of the big points he makes is that social media is causing teens to lose empathy.


In our interview, he talked about a study done on college students. The study found that over the past 30 years, self-centeredness has increased by 40 percent in students and empathy has decreased by 30 percent.

 

This lack of empathy is a product of an internet culture that teaches kids they are the center of the universe and distances them from real relationships and face-to-face conversations.


Lack of empathy is a product of an internet culture that distances kids from real relationships. CLICK TO TWEET
With this lack of empathy and face-to-face connection, it has become easier and easier for kids to bully other kids online. They even share videos of bullying, so the whole school can see, causing kids to be desensitized to inappropriate and cruel behavior.

 

by Meg Meeker

 
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Parents, the folks at Sesame Workshop want to talk to you about manners vs. empathy

Parents, the folks at Sesame Workshop want to talk to you about manners vs. empathy | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
Parents of young children, I have a question for you. Which is more important for your child to possess — manners or empathy?

While years of academic research clearly show empathy — defined as the cognitive and affective components of walking in someone else’s shoes — to be one of the most important qualities for children to have to ensure future success, parents would rather their children be polite, according to a new survey we conducted at Sesame Workshop called “K is for Kind: A National Survey on Kindness and Kids.”

 

By Jennifer Kotler Clarke 

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(Empathic Parenting) Empathy and the Danish Way of Parenting: Jessica Joelle Alexander and Edwin Rutsch

(Empathic Parenting) Empathy and the Danish Way of Parenting: Jessica Joelle Alexander and Edwin Rutsch | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Jessica joelle Alexander is an American expat, author, columnist and cultural trainer. She graduated with a BS in a psychology and went on to teach communication and writing skills in Scandinavia and central Europe. Married to a Dane for 13 years, she lives in Rome with her husband and two children, Sophia and Sebastian. She is the co-author of

The Danish Way of Parenting; What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids.

 

 "The Danes' highly developed sense of empathy is one of the main reasons that Denmark is consistently voted one of the happiest countries in the world (this year it is once again number one). Empathy plays a key role in improving our social connections, which is a major factor in our overall happiness."

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(Empathic Parenting) 'The Danish way' trumps the American dream: “empathy” is a far better predictor of well-being than the American dream.

(Empathic Parenting) 'The Danish way' trumps the American dream: “empathy” is a far better predictor of well-being than the American dream. | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

 Through my many years living among people voted as the happiest in the world, I have to say that I learned some valuable life lessons. One of the most important being that “empathy” is a far better predictor of wellbeing than the American dream.

 

I used to undervalue the importance of empathy until I married a Dane.  Through my many years living among people voted as the happiest in the world, I have to say that I learned some valuable life lessons. One of the most important being that “empathy” is a far better predictor of wellbeing than the American dream.
 
 by Jessica Alexander
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Lessons From Denmark: Teachers Can Incorporate Empathy in the Curriculum  

Lessons From Denmark: Teachers Can Incorporate Empathy in the Curriculum   | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
What secrets can U.S. educators glean from classrooms in the happiest country in the world?

After talking to teachers in Denmark, authors Jessica Alexander and Iben Sandahl discovered a surprising addition to the K-12 curriculum: weekly teaching about empathy. The cultivation of this learned skill in schools can make a difference for students throughout their lives, Alexander wrote in Salon.

In their book The Danish Way of Parenting; What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids (2016), Alexander and Sandahl highlight the power of a school program in many Denmark schools called "Klassen Time," which translates to the "Class's Hour." Once a week, students bring in a traditional cake and take an hour to connect with one another. The practice allows students and teachers to find solutions to unresolved problems they may have with each other, in the classroom, or at home in order to create a culture of openness and understanding.

 

By Kate Stoltzfus

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(Empathic Parenting) Could empathy be the antidote to bullying?

(Empathic Parenting) Could empathy be the antidote to bullying? | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
Our society could probably learn something from the Danes, where empathy is considered such a vital social skill that it is taught in school.

 

(There's even a much ballyhooed book on the topic, "The Danish Way of Parenting: What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids.")

While some anti-bullying programs in the U.S. emphasize this, even more could be done. Empathetic, connected children are not only less likely to bully, they are more likely to step in and protect a classmate who is bullied.

All I know is this: Bullying is not just kids' stuff. It can cause wounds that last for years, decades and even generations. So let's stop the cruelty and start teaching children reading, writing and empathy.

 

 By Tammy Swift

 

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Why Danish Students Are Happier and More Empathetic

Why Danish Students Are Happier and More Empathetic | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Contrary to popular belief, most people do care about the welfare of others.

From an evolutionary standpoint, empathy is a valuable impulse that helps humans survive in groups. In American schools, this impulse has been lying dormant from a lack of focus. But in Denmark, a nation that has consistently been voted the happiest place in the world since Richard Nixon was president, children are taught about empathy from a young age both inside and outside of school....

 

Another program, which is increasingly popular, is called CAT-kit. This program is aimed at improving emotional awareness and empathy and focuses on how to articulate experiences, thoughts, feelings, and senses.

 

 

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FAMILY AND MARRIAGE: Walk in someone else’s shoes

FAMILY AND MARRIAGE: Walk in someone else’s shoes | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Sympathy usually doesn’t generate much action on our part toward the person suffering the misfortune. Empathy does. As Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott point out in their book “Trading Places,” “Empathy creates understanding, understanding produces connection, connection gives direction to necessary action.”


Putting ourselves in our spouse’s shoes, “trading places” with them, provides a number of practical benefits.

  • It reduces criticism. It’s not as easy to be critical with someone when you have experienced what they are going through.
  • It eliminates nagging. Instead, it gives the person encouragement.
  • It shortens conflict. Empathy moves us from blaming to shared responsibility
  • It deepens friendship. “They are on our side.”

 

 Roger Rollins executive director of The Family and Marriage Coalition

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Psychologist on raising human beings: parents need to begin with empathy.

Psychologist on raising human beings: parents need to begin with empathy. | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

When solving a problem together, Ross Greene says, parents need to begin with empathy.

 

Greene’s new book, “Raising Human Beings: Creating a Collaborative Partnership With Your Child,” addresses families in which the kids may not kick or hit, but do whine and pout. When solving a problem together, he says, parents ought to begin with empathy.

 

“Kids have information that we very badly need,” Greene said. “What’s hard for them. What’s getting in their way.” Once adults really listen to kids, both parties can share their concerns; then the adult invites the child to collaborate on a solution that’s mutually satisfactory.

 

By Kate Tuttle

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Empathy: growing children who care - Baby Hints and Tips

Empathy: growing children who care - Baby Hints and Tips | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
We all want to rear children who demonstrate empathy, right? It may be a matter of overcoming the reality gap, and practicing what we preach.

 

What can we, as parents, do to close this rhetoric/reality gap? The researchers give several good suggestions and many of them focus on simply setting a good example of caring for others, being respectful and fair.

 

Other ideas include:

  • Ask your child’s teacher if they are kind to classmates, in addition to how they are performing academically
  • Have children practice expressing gratitude to others in their lives (waitresses, grandparents, etc.)
  • Use news stories about others who are suffering to explain to children how other people face challenges and struggles in other settings or other countries
  • Give children opportunities to reach out to help others in the larger community (e.g., help at a food bank, assist an elderly neighbor)
  • Read books that tell stories about empathy and kindness (these suggestions include ideas for preschool to high school age groups)

 

Amy Webb

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How Parents Can Raise Empathetic Leaders In Trump’s America

How Parents Can Raise Empathetic Leaders In Trump’s America | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it


REVA SETH 11.18.16 5:00 AM
I’ve never been able to sit through a full episode of The Apprentice. President-Elect Donald Trump’s management and communication style flashes me back to my own three-month stint working with a boss like that. It gives me an instant migraine.

But my own reaction isn't just a matter of personal preference. The business world is moving decisively toward management models that conflict with Trump's pugnacious leadership style. Collaboration, active listening, vulnerability, and empathy are all traits companies, recruiters, and hiring managers say they value—and increasingly have a hard time finding....

 

Reading emotional cues, being familiar with the language of emotions, and 'feeling with' the other is what empathy is all about," says Mary Gordon, the founder of the Roots of Empathy classroom program, which has been shown to reduce levels of aggression among schoolchildren. "Parents and teachers have powerful opportunities every day to nurture empathy in children," says Gordon. "They do this when they interact and speak with others, including the child, in an empathic way.

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(Empathic Parenting) This is your brain on empathy 

(Empathic Parenting) This is your brain on empathy  | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
HOW TO TRAIN YOUR BRAIN FOR EMPATHY


These studies show that empathy can be thought of as skill we can practice and improve. Here are six daily (or weekly) ideas Krznic suggest for cultivating empathy....

Switch on your empathic brain. Recognise that empathy is at the core of human nature. Empathy isn’t just something you are born with. Most people can expand their capacity for empathy — both cognitive and emotional empathy — by practising mindful attention towards other people’s feelings and experiences.


Make the imaginative leap. Make a conscious effort to step into another person’s shoes. Acknowledge their humanity, their individuality and perspectives. Try this for both your friends and your ‘enemies’.


Seek experiential adventures. Explore lives and cultures that contrast with your own. “Next time you are planning a holiday, don’t ask yourself, ‘Where can I go next?’ but instead ‘Whose shoes can I stand in next?’” suggests Krznaric.


Practice the craft of conversation. ...
Travel in your armchair.  ...
Get curious about strangers..

 

 

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(Empathic Parenting) Can Your Kids Define Empathy? Here's Why They Need It to Thrive in School and Life  

(Empathic Parenting) Can Your Kids Define Empathy? Here's Why They Need It to Thrive in School and Life   | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
To what extent empathy is an innate or learned trait is still being debated by scientists. Economists have long assumed that each individual is completely self-interested and rational, always making the choice that most benefits them no matter what the cost.

 

However, some scientists are beginning the challenge this idea, instead asserting that the instinct to empathize with others is a key element of group cohesion.

 

Being a part of a tribe that cared more deeply for one another could be a distinct advantage if you got sick and needed to be nursed back to health, or if you needed to band together to protect your land or tribe members. Empathy led to better chances for survival, these scientists argue, more than single-minded selfishness.

 

Constance Scharff, 

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(Teaching Empathy) The Importance of Teaching Children Empathy

(Teaching Empathy) The Importance of Teaching Children Empathy | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Empathy is defined as the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It seems so simple, yet it is an essential (and often overlooked) skill children need to learn in order to develop into healthy adults.

 

As parents, it’s not always in the forefront of our minds, and some may find it a bit odd to think they need to actually teach their child empathy. Doesn’t it just come naturally? 

 

1. Make your parental expectations clear. ...
2. Identify Feelings...
3. Be a Role Model...

 

Chantal D. Hayes,

References:
Dewar, Gwen, Ph.D. (2009-2014). Teaching empathy: Evidence-based tips for fostering empathy in children. http://www.parentingscience.com/teaching-empathy-tips.html#sthash.HsaVK1hh.dpuf
 
Joyce, Amy. (July 18, 2014) Are you raising nice kids? A Harvard psychologist gives 5 ways to raise them to be kind. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2014/07/18/are-you-raising-nice-kids-a-harvard-psychologist-gives-5-ways-to-raise-them-to-be-kind/
 
Lahey, Jessica. (September 4, 2014.) Teaching Children Empathy. http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/teaching-children-empathy/?_r=0
 
VanClay, Mary. (2008). The caring child: How to teach empathy. http://www.babycenter.com/0_the-caring-child-how-to-teach-empathy_67146.bc
 
Weissbourd, Richard, and Jones, Stephanie. How Parents Can Cultivate Empathy in Children. Harvard Graduate School of Education. http://sites.gse.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/making-caring-common/files/empathy.pdf

 

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How to Raise Empathetic Kids

How to Raise Empathetic Kids | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
You know it’s important, but do you know why? Or how to cultivate this crucial character trait? Here are some practical tips for every age.
 
Everyone is talking about empathy right now, from politicians to school counselors. And in an age where cyberbullying and racial tensions are front and center, it’s easy to see why.

 

Being empathetic means you enter into another’s reality, whether that is someone’s pain or simply a different way of life. (And it’s different from sympathy, which is feeling for someone; empathy is feeling with someone. Think of it as being in a painting instead of just observing it.)

 

Empathy is, essentially, valuing another person and his experience. And the world certainly needs more of that. If you want to grow it in your child, follow this advice.

 

By Yelena Moroz Alpert

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Danish classrooms built for empathy, happiness

Danish classrooms built for empathy, happiness | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
This seating arrangement unwittingly encourages empathy because students have to try to understand another student’s issues in order to help explain how to solve them. It is also a very different set of skills to have to explain something to another person rather than just remember it individually. Interestingly, many studies show that teaching others actually enhances individual learning and memory retention much more than rote memorization.

 

by Jessica Alexander 

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Bryan Kay's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:40 PM

I chose this resource to use for motivation or general ideas to become a better principal and educational leader.

 

I chose this resource to use for motivation or general ideas to become a better principal and educational leader.

 

School culture is an important part of the success for teachers and leaders. 

 

One thing my principal does well is build relationships. This makes me want to work harder and I have much more respect for her. I want to ensure I embody the same characteristics when I am a leader someday.

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Teaching Kids Empathy: In Danish Schools, It’s … Well, It’s a Piece of Cake | Jessica Alexander | AlterNet.org

Teaching Kids Empathy: In Danish Schools, It’s … Well, It’s a Piece of Cake | Jessica Alexander | AlterNet.org | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

We all know what a Danish pastry is — that delightful caloric bomb of glazed breakfast deliciousness. But what about a Danish classroom cake? And moreover, how can this help teach empathy?

While researching our book “The Danish Way of Parenting; What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids,” my co-author and I interviewed numerous teachers and students across Denmark to learn how they incorporate empathy in schools and at home. Notably, in the Danish education system empathy is considered as important as teaching math and literature, and it is woven into the school’s curriculum from pre-school through high school.

The Danes’ highly developed sense of empathy is one of the main reasons that Denmark is consistently voted one of the happiest countries in the world (this year it is once again number one). Empathy plays a key role in improving our social connections, which is a major factor in our overall happiness.

What many don’t realize is that empathy is a learned skill that many of us miss out on in America. In fact, some studies show empathy levels have dropped up to 40 percent in the U.S. in the last 30 years, while narcissism is on the steady rise.

Why is teaching empathy so important?


Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Online Marketing
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(Teaching Empathy) Denmark schools train students in empathy as early as preschool

(Teaching Empathy) Denmark schools train students in empathy as early as preschool | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
  • Danish children are exposed to lessons as early as preschool that are specifically designed to foster feelings of empathy and understanding.

  • The Atlantic reports a program called Step by Step presents young students with pictures of kids showing a range of emotions and helps them identify these feelings, talk about them and respect them.

  • Anti-bullying programs teach students to care more about each other, the CAT-kit program helps students develop empathy and emotional awareness and classroom teachers group students of mixed abilities to encourage collaboration, teamwork and respect across differences.


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[Empathic Parenting] Teaching Empathy To Children - The Danish Way of Parenting

[Empathic Parenting] Teaching Empathy To Children - The Danish Way of Parenting | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it
We all want our kids to be happy. And happiness is something the Danes have supposedly figured out, with research consistently showing that residents of Denmark are among the happiest in the world. So, it’s not a huge surprise that an article we published on Danish parenting tips has proved to be one of our most-read. Due to this popularity, we decided to do a deep-dive into some of the bigger philosophies rooted in Danish culture with The Danish Way of Parenting authors Jessica Alexander and psychotherapist Iben Sandahl leading the way.


Last month we discussed the power of play-based parenting, and this time around we’re talking to the authors about the Danes’ belief in the importance of teaching children the concept of empathy.


“...The Danes teach empathy in schools, which is quite special. Empathy is such a big concept and it is taught in so many different ways for different ages. Three examples would be language choice, letting children self-regulate, and reading a wide range of stories.


WRITTEN BY KATIE HINTZ-ZAMBRANO


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Daniela Poggi's curator insight, August 25, 2015 7:43 AM

Insegnare l'empatia ai bambini

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Dr. Michelle Borba presents why empathy is key to real success

Dr. Michelle Borba presents why empathy is key to real success | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

With the influence of social media and changes in parenting styles in our culture, research shows kids have become more self-absorbed. But a well-known author came to town to provide resources on what parents can do to help alleviate this problem.

Dr. Michelle Borba is an education psychologist and bestselling author of Unselfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed In Our All About Me World.

“For instance you can do the simplest one called the too kind rule starting at the age of 3 and keep going until your kids are 45, but when you walk out this house you are to say or do at least two kind things to somebody today,” says Borba.

 

By Stefanté Randall

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(Empathic Parenting) (Teaching Empathy) The importance of helping your children to develop empathy

(Empathic Parenting) (Teaching Empathy) The importance of helping your children to develop empathy | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

 

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another being is experiencing from within the other being’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. Empathy moves us to share in another’s pain, to really see the world through their eyes. When we do, it very often changes the kind of decisions and actions we take.

 

 There are many definitions for empathy which encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include

  • cognitive empathy,
  • emotional empathy, and
  • somatic empathy.

 

 

Teaching Empathy

  1. Treat children as individuals with minds of their own,
  2. Model empathy...
  3. Make kids aware of the similarities they share with others....
  4. Empathy involves perspective taking skills...
  5. Make a face....
  6. More oxytocin, “the bonding hormone”, can help better decode emotional meaning in facial expressions....
  7. Reassessment of the Milgram Experiments –Moral Disengagement...
  8. Express your feelings openly...
  9. Emotional vocabulary is key...
  10. Monitor and guide media use...

 

 

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42 Ways to Raise a Kind Child | UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba

42 Ways to Raise a Kind Child | UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Dr. Michele Borba shares 42 ways to raise a kind child from her book, UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World

 

1.Talk feelings. Kids need an emotion vocabulary to discuss feelings and guidance to become emotionally literate. Point out feelings in films, books, or people and use emotion words.

 

2. Be an emotion coach. Find natural moments to connect face-to-face, listen, and validate your child’s feelings while boosting emotional literacy (“You look happy. You seem sad.”)

 

3. Share kind deeds. Let’s not assume kids know how to show others they care. Tune them up! “That girl looks like she could use a hug.” “I bet that boy hopes someone asks him to play.

 

4. Make teamwork and caring a priority Insist that they consider others, even when it inconveniences them.

 

5. Teach: “Always look at the color of the talker’s eyes.” Kids must learn to read people’s emotions face to face, so enforce the “color at the talker’s eye” rule to help them use eye contact, and pick up facial expressions, voice tone and emotional cues.

 

6. Make kindness matter. Instead of, “I want you to be happy.” Stress, “I want you to be kind.”

 

7. Use “Feels + Needs” formula. Draw attention to people’s feelings, and then ask your child to guess what the person might feel or need in order to change his mood or be comforted.

 

8. Start kid book clubs! It’s a fun way for parents to connect with their kids and they with peers while boosting empathy and a love of reading. Try: The Mother-Daughter Book Club

 

Michele Borba, Ed.D.

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42 Ways to Raise a Kind Child | UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba

42 Ways to Raise a Kind Child | UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba | Empathic Family & Parenting | Scoop.it

Dr. Michele Borba shares 42 ways to raise a kind child from her book, UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World

 

1.Talk feelings. Kids need an emotion vocabulary to discuss feelings and guidance to become emotionally literate. Point out feelings in films, books, or people and use emotion words.

 

2. Be an emotion coach. Find natural moments to connect face-to-face, listen, and validate your child’s feelings while boosting emotional literacy (“You look happy. You seem sad.”)

 

3. Share kind deeds. Let’s not assume kids know how to show others they care. Tune them up! “That girl looks like she could use a hug.” “I bet that boy hopes someone asks him to play.

 

4. Make teamwork and caring a priority Insist that they consider others, even when it inconveniences them.

 

5. Teach: “Always look at the color of the talker’s eyes.” Kids must learn to read people’s emotions face to face, so enforce the “color at the talker’s eye” rule to help them use eye contact, and pick up facial expressions, voice tone and emotional cues.

 

6. Make kindness matter. Instead of, “I want you to be happy.” Stress, “I want you to be kind.”

 

7. Use “Feels + Needs” formula. Draw attention to people’s feelings, and then ask your child to guess what the person might feel or need in order to change his mood or be comforted.

 

8. Start kid book clubs! It’s a fun way for parents to connect with their kids and they with peers while boosting empathy and a love of reading. Try: The Mother-Daughter Book Club

 

Michele Borba, Ed.D.

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