Empathy research
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EMPATHY: What is it, anyway?

EMPATHY: What is it, anyway? | Empathy research | Scoop.it

The Center for Creative Leadership did a study with data from 6,731 managers from 38 countries. Their study found that the ability to understand what others are feeling is a skill that clearly contributes to effective leadership. In some cultures, the connection between empathy and performance is particularly striking, placing an even greater value on empathy as a leadership skill.

 

The findings were consistent across the sample: empathy is positively related to job performance. Managers who show more empathy toward direct reports are viewed as better performers in their job by their bosses.

 

dr Ada


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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, May 30, 2013 7:36 AM

What I found most endearing in this post were the definitions of empathy written by second graders. They explained it beautifully.

The author concludes then that "if you can practice empathy at least at the level these second graders describe it, you'll be a great leader".

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 30, 2013 10:27 AM

In the article there is a reference to teaching and explaining empathy. It is something we need to model and demonstrate. It cannot be reduced to a simple cognitive exercise.

Florentine van Thiel's curator insight, May 31, 2013 3:30 AM

La capacité à comprendre les sentiments des autres est une compétence qui contribue clairement à un leadership efficace.

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Uniquely Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista can see through each other's eyes

Uniquely Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista can see through each other's eyes | Empathy research | Scoop.it

Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista has unique abilities to see through the other's eyes. Recent functional MRIs demonstrate that physical sensation can be a shared experience too: one can feel the touch of a hand on the other’s kneecap, identify a particular toe being tugged, laugh when her twin is being tickled. They also may share some motor function.

 

They are conjoined not just by flesh and bone. Their brains are zippered together by a neural bridge between the thalami, the sensory processing hubs of their brains. This bridge, which the girls can flitter across at will, has raised questions and inspired a sense of wonder among even the most seasoned specialists.

 

How does it work? What are its limits? What could it mean to our understanding of the ability of the brain to change and adapt? What does it mean in terms of how we understand the development of personality, empathy and consciousness?

 

Doug Cochrane, a neurosurgeon at B.C. Children’s Hospital, was part of a multi-disciplinary team assembled to attend the birth and followup care of the girls in 2006. He had never worked with a set of craniopagus twins; conjoined twins are extremely rare and those joined at the head are the rarest, with an occurrence rate estimated at one in 2.5 million births. Few survive.


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Kimmy S's curator insight, April 19, 2013 10:52 AM

Very Intresting!

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Playlist : Learning Through Empathy - Elementary - NFB

Playlist : Learning Through Empathy - Elementary - NFB | Empathy research | Scoop.it

This playlist offers elementary school teachers unique Canadian resources that will help students explore, discuss, and ultimately express empathy, an essential skill for navigating the diversity and conflicts inherent in our global community.

 

At the most basic level, empathy can be described as “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” Empathy allows children to see the world from other people’s perspectives and to walk, if only for a few steps, in their shoes.

 

In schools, empathetic children listen to conflicting points of view and are capable of exploring peaceful solutions. When they see someone being hurt or bullied, these children refuse to be passive bystanders; instead, they speak up. Young people with a strong sense of empathy extend a helping 


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PARTICIPATE IN CHANGE: Vote for changemaker Madeleine Rogin in the Great American Teach-Off

PARTICIPATE IN CHANGE: Vote for changemaker Madeleine Rogin in the Great American Teach-Off | Empathy research | Scoop.it

"A Change Leader for Ashoka’s “Start Empathy” Initiative and Changemaker Schools Network, Madeleine Rogin teaches Kindergarten and Dance at Prospect Sierra School in El Cerrito, CA. With your support, she can win a 10K classroom grant!"


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The Ashoka Community's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:34 PM

Madeleine Rogin is an inspiration to many, especially her students. Utlilizing the Peaceful Changemakers Curriculum she developed, Rogin's students gain a deeper understanding for social issues as well as to become problem solvers. Watch wonderful videos in which Rogin's students explain how they define a changemaker (teaser: "The Lorax was a changemaker because he spoke for the trees") and in which Rogin explains her strategy. Then be a changemaker yourself & VOTE for Madeleine (every day)!

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Baby steps toward empathy

Baby steps toward empathy | Empathy research | Scoop.it

The Roots of Empathy program was implemented provincewide in the 2002/03 school year and 35,000 kindergarten to Grade 8 students have experienced it.

 

Program founder Mary Gordon visited Winnipeg Wednesday, and said she came up with the idea after seeing one similarity in all the child abuse and neglect cases she encountered.

 

"The common denominator was an absence of empathy." The parent had never felt it or seen it, said the internationally renowned teacher, children's advocate and parenting expert. The program she founded in 1996 brings babies and parents into the classroom so kids can see a healthy bond and identify with a vulnerable infant. Roots of Empathy has been adopted around the world and Gordon has been invited to speak at the United Nations about how showing compassion to kids can change behaviour, if not the world.


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3 Games for Teaching Empathy: Turning Kids Into Caring Children

3 Games for Teaching Empathy: Turning Kids Into Caring Children | Empathy research | Scoop.it

Empathy is the act of understanding and feeling what another is experiencing. It includes sympathy, compassion, and identification. We observe the feelings of another with our eyes and ears. We respond with our hearts.

 

Experts say empathy is the cornerstone of character. Let’s find out how games can help you build empathy and character in your children....

 

First: Character Building with “Describe the Emotion”...

Second: Building Character with “Spot the Feeling”...

Third: Character Building with “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall”..

 

by Andrea B.

 

Video and Book: Character Building: Problem Stories for Family Discussions

http://youtu.be/uqFjzUsXXrg
 

 


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PB NewsHour Video: Bringing Babies to the Classroom to Teach Empathy, Prevent Bullying

PB NewsHour Video: Bringing Babies to the Classroom to Teach Empathy, Prevent Bullying | Empathy research | Scoop.it

"The 20 or so kindergartners are already well acquainted with Claire, a seven-month-old infant who visits the classroom regularly as part of the social and emotional learning program Roots of Empathy.

 

Roots of Empathy, first started in 1996 in Toronto and introduced into U.S. schools in 2007, aims to build more peaceful and caring societies by increasing the level of empathy in children. In the last six years, the program has spread to California, New York and other parts of Washington."

 

Also see my extended interview with Roors of Empathy founder: Mary Gordon http://j.mp/LDeQli


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Defeating the Culture of Bullying

Defeating the Culture of Bullying | Empathy research | Scoop.it

The common denominator of all types of bullying is a lack, or erosion, of empathy. Nurturing empathy, a potential that is present in almost all children, is therefore at the heart of interventions to reduce bullying. (Bazelon’s book is itself a model of empathy - not only for victims and their families, but also for the families of bullies, for kids who are wrongly accused, and for educators struggling to do the right thing, even when their responses are ineffective.)

 

In the end, Bazelon raises a larger question: What can we do, asparents, to nurture qualities of empathy and kindness in our children? How can we reduce the risk that they will get caught up in hurtful teen-age drama? How can we help them become “upstanders,” not bystanders, to meanness and cruelty?

 

by Kenneth Barish, Ph.D.


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The Case Against Empathy | IdeaFeed | Big Think

The Case Against Empathy | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Empathy research | Scoop.it
Globalization has resulted in a call for a global ethics, one in which all the people of the world are considered part of the human family. Unfortunately, empathy does not function on such a large scale.
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Empathy and Risk Assessment | Wonderland

Empathy and Risk Assessment | Wonderland | Empathy research | Scoop.it

I’m a little behind on my reading, so I only just got to last week’s New Yorker. In it, I discovered a remarkable, thought-provoking essay by superstar psychologist Paul Bloom. It’s called “The Baby in the Well: The case against empathy,” and it does, indeed, make a compelling case against empathy.

 

As Bloom puts it: “Empathy has some unfortunate features–it is parochial, narrow-minded, and innumerate. We’re often at our best when we’re smart enough not to rely on it.”


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