Empathy in the Arts
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The Watching Dance Project’s Videos on Vimeo

The Watching Dance Project’s Videos on Vimeo | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Here are all of the videos that The Watching Dance Project has uploaded to Vimeo. Appearances are videos that The Watching Dance Project has been credited in by others.

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Empathy in the Arts
Empathy and Compassion in the Arts (Drawing, Writing, Stories, Poetry, Music, Dance, Fine Art, etc) - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


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Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
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Chaz Ebert to Host Panel on Empathy on the Big Screen at Cannes

Chaz Ebert to Host Panel on Empathy on the Big Screen at Cannes | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Roger Ebert’s oft-quoted line about how movies are “a machine that generates empathy” will be the topic of a panel discussion at the Cannes Film Festival. “What Does Empathy Look Like On the Big Screen?” will be held at 3pm Sunday, May 17th at the American Pavilion.


Nate Kohn, Vice President of the Peabody Awards and Festival Director of Ebertfest, will serve as the moderator. Fittingly, the panel will be held in the Roger Ebert Conference Room of the Pavilion.

Chaz Ebert, President of The Ebert Company and Publisher of RogerEbert.com will welcome panelists John Sloss of Cinetic Media; Cameron Bailey, Artistic Director of the Toronto International Film Festival, and Anne Thompson of Indiewire and Thompson on Hollywood for a free-wheeling conversation about why empathy should be encouraged in the works of emerging writers on film and filmmakers.


Chaz says, "Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It is the antidote to the feelings of isolation and insecurity which can result in all kinds of ills in our society. Not only is it good for the bottom line (audiences hunger for films with characters they can relate to, and with themes that touch on hope rather than mere despair and destruction), but it can lead to a change in the conversations about our future." 


by The Editors

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'Radical Empathy' Exhibit Addresses Race

'Radical Empathy' Exhibit Addresses Race | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Stephanie Seguino's exhibition of large-scale color photographs, on view at the Flynndog in Burlington, would be visually powerful even if it weren't so painfully relevant. For "Radical Empathy," she has used her camera like a pickax: to chip away at white Americans' stereotypes of black men. And she has undertaken that task at a time when hostile and fear-laden preconceptions have repeatedly proved lethal — most recently in Baltimore, Md., and before that in Cleveland, Ohio; Ferguson, Mo.; Staten Island, N.Y.; and North Charleston, S.C.


The contrast between summary judgments and actual character forms the core of "Radical Empathy." The title is meant as an appeal for understanding of black men's lives, Seguino says. Achieving such awareness amounts to a radical act, she adds, in that "empathy toward black men is the exception, not the norm."

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The Creative Power of Empathy

The Creative Power of Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
During this week, 100 years after the birth of Elizabeth Catlett on April 15, 1915, we are reminded of her empathetic spirit, in addition to her monumental body of art and her association with Hampton University. And we are imagining what the example of her selfless spirit implies for contemporary styles of art.


Catlett empathized particularly with oppressed and struggling people and wanted her art to be a healing, motivating and empowering experience for them....


Elizabeth Catlett's empathetic mastery prompts us to consider how contemporary forms of art can be inspiring public experiences, reach people needing special support and impress critics and other art insiders.

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What the World Needs Now is Empathy By Ernie McCray

What the World Needs Now is Empathy By Ernie McCray | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
I look around me,
breathing in deeply
as I reflect on the totality
of what I see.
Before me, a man lays sleeping
on a downtown street
that jumps with a crisp
four/four time Hip-Hop beat,
bouncing from an upbeat retreat,
where folks hang out,
chillaxed to the max
as it’s the “Thank God it’s Friday,”
day of the week.
The man is wrapped up in a
tattered army sleeping bag lined with a bed sheet
that had long ago given up on the idea of being a sheet
and the forecast calls for snow or sleet
and a passerby pinches her nose with her
forefinger and her thumb,
thinking why doesn’t somebody arrest this bum?


Empathy, I’m thinking on the run,

.....

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Empathy by John K Trainer

Empathy by John K Trainer | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

You seek a crown of gold
And yet the heart is fallow
A famine of the soul
Unbeknownst and unconcerned 
The poor hunger for food and shelter
And you have an appetite that’s never satiated
The many feasts of endless delicacies and wealth
Has not spoiled your cravings ...

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Actors Help Inmates Develop Empathy

Actors Help Inmates Develop Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Sabra Williams, an actor and the Actors' Gang prison program director, explains that once inmates are given the tools and the opportunity to work as a team they develop empathy and start to create healthy relationships.


'People in prisons survive by numbing their emotions, and when people are numb they have no empathy and continue to commit crimes,' she says. One inmate confirms, 'I came here to learn how to control my emotions rather than let my emotions control me.'


Another who has done the course several times explains, 'It puts your head in a different mind-set.'

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Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc

Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Neuroscience suggests that the classic dramatic arc can change our brains and spur us to action. Kirby Ferguson, Paul Zak
6 MINUTES

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Jason Phelps's Banquet of Empathy

Jason Phelps's Banquet of Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Interested in exploring the idea of empathy from multiple perspectives, Phelps asked eight playwrights he admires and has worked with to write brief solo pieces on the question, “What does it mean to engage in an act of compassion?”

“Eight is significant to me,” says Phelps. “I had the idea for this show and picked an animal Tarot card around New Year’s—it was an eight, which represents a spider, so the spider is a symbol of creativity and making a web. Compassion is connected to the number eight in Buddhist thinking and practice. And my birthday has eights in it, plus eight is the symbol of infinity, so it’s very significant.”
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Pixar Storytelling Rules #3: Character Empathy

We easily empathize with characters that are like us, and even more easily with characters that we wish we were like, usually confident, sexy, successful people. Pixar got us to empathize with a mute robot, a rat, monsters and many other unusual suspects. How did they do it?


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Learning From Live Theater: Students realize gains from theater trips - Research

Learning From Live Theater: Students realize gains from theater trips - Research | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We also employed a measure known as the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET), which captures the ability to infer what other people are thinking or feeling by looking at their eyes.


The test was developed by British psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen and his colleagues as a tool for studying theory of mind, particularly for people with autism.


It is now widely used by researchers interested in studying theory of mind and empathy for people developing typically, as well as for those with autism.


Researchers using RMET have found that reading literary fiction or engaging in theatrical role-playing enhances people’s ability to read the emotions of others. We suspected that watching live theater might have a similar effect and decided to include RMET in our survey.


The version of RMET we employed was developed for use with adolescents and has 28 photographs cropped to show only people’s eyes. Subjects are asked to pick one of four words that best describes what the photographed person is thinking or feeling.



by Jay P. Greene

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Does Literature Make You Empathic?

Does Literature Make You Empathic? | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

An article published last year in Science presented evidence that literary fiction makes readers more empathic than popular fiction; that is, it claims LitFic is better for you than mystery, romance, thrillers, or science fiction. Author Ransom Stephens offers a primer to prepare you to participate in Litquake's Does Literature Make You an Empath? event next week...


My aim here isn’t merely to convince you to mark your calendar; it’s to prepare you to participate in Litquake’s Does Literature Make You an Empath? event next Tuesday at the Mechanics’ Institute Library in San Francisco....


Litquake’s Does Literature Make You an Empath? panel is Tuesday, Oct. 14, 6:30pm at the Mechanics’ Institute Library in San Francisco. For more information, visit litquake.org.


by Ransom Stephens



Does Literature Make You an Empath?
http://www.litquake.org/events/does-literature-make-you-empath  

Our panel of LitFic and genre authors plus experts on the science of empathy (and you!) will investigate why or whether high-brow lit cranks up empathy more than a good mystery, romance, or space opera. For reservations: (415) 393-0100; rsvp@milibrary.org

Litquake Panel

Does literature make you an empath?http://www.milibrary.org/milibrary/events/litquake-does-literature-make-you-empath-oct-14-2014 
Our panel of fiction and genre authors plus experts on the science of empathy (and you!) will investigate why or whether high-brow lit cranks up empathy more than a good mystery, romance, or space opera. What techniques do writers employ to evoke sympathy or distain? What does neuroscience say about how we “mirror behavior?” Join this provocative discussion!
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Barbara Kerr's curator insight, October 11, 2014 3:10 PM

How do we know what others feel?  Literature--which is basically storytelling afterall-- is one good way to feel what others are feeling.

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Cannes 2015 Panel: "What Does Empathy Look Like on the Big Screen?" | Cannes

Cannes 2015 Panel: "What Does Empathy Look Like on the Big Screen?"  | Cannes | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
At a panel hosted by Chaz Ebert, journalists and film industry members shared their thoughts on empathy.


In a room known as the Roger Ebert Conference Center, the American Pavilion at Cannes hosted a panel this afternoon inspired by one of Ebert's most well known statements—that "movies are a machine that generates empathy."


In her introductory remarks, Chaz Ebert noted that when someone begins to talk about empathy, "people think that it's like forcing you to eat broccoli."


But she sees empathy as a more hopeful concept, and noted why empathy is important. "A lot of the ideas that people have, you get from the cinema," she said. 


Some of the panelists suggested that empathizing starts with the filmmakers themselves


by Ben Kenigsberg


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Empathy Through Art: Understanding War and PTSD by Karin Salvalaggio

Empathy Through Art: Understanding War and PTSD by Karin Salvalaggio | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We may walk away such experiences with heavy hearts, but that’s a small price to pay for empathy. In a world dominated by sound bites, spin and winner-take-all, it’s that vital human connection that sets us apart as a civilized society.

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Antoine Catala: Distant Feel looks for a new path to empathy

Antoine Catala: Distant Feel looks for a new path to empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

New York-based French artist Antoine Catala claims that "recent studies show that young people communicate more through a screen than face to face" and that "we become overwhelmed and our capacity for empathy gets challenged."


For the exhibition Antoine Catala: Distant Feel, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Catala has "rebranded" empathy. He posits that empathy is evolving and he seems earnest enough, explaining that he worked with ad agency Droga5 to create a new term and symbol, and to "craft a message to change the world." "Distant feel" is described as "a cool, detached, focused form of empathy," expressible "through the distance of an image."


By Nadine Wasserman

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Empathy by RMS

Empathy by RMS | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Raindrops of emotion pouring down

Feelings lashing storm battered mind

Seeking a shelter buried deep within
Dry and warm where peace you'll find...





Empathy is a special quality, giving a compassionate ear to others is important but it is also important to be compassionate with ourselves. At times retreat makes us stronger.

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Carnegie Museum exhibit examines detached empathy of digital age

Carnegie Museum exhibit examines detached empathy of digital age | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The reason, Catala says, is that “empathy is too intense or too raw and can become a hindrance rather than a help.” He rebranded this feeling as something called “distant feel.”


“Distant feel is a cool, detached, focused form of empathy,” he says. “It acknowledges that it's paradoxically OK to be distant and encourages us to express our empathy in an effective way.

“Empathy is fundamental to our shared human experience, core to our biology, our evolution, our culture, our society,” he says. “It is the raw, unprocessed emotional connective tissue between people. It is the glue that holds the human race together.”

Conversely, the distant-feel symbol, those mirrored Es, is mutable. It can be drawn, typed or gestured, as in holding three fingers in each hand to make the design.


By Kurt Shaw

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"Unmasking Empathy" explores perceptions of diversity

"Unmasking Empathy" explores perceptions of diversity | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Devyn Hebert ’17, Gideon Hess ’16 and Claire Bergey ’17 acted in the play, which posed questions about our capacity for empathy. 


Ideally, empathy allows us to attach meaning to others’ experiences, but the play provokes certain questions:

  • Can we truly understand that which we haven’t experienced?
  •  Is true empathy possible, or is it a socially constructed performance that allows us to feel closer to each other and better about our own humanity?
  •  In other words, if empathy is just an act, then why is it so important?


One line spoken between the actors stands out, neatly summarizing the doubts with which the audience grappled:

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Watch now: American Masters | Marian Seldes on Empathy and Cruelty in Directing Actors | KNPB Channel 5 Video

Watch now: American Masters | Marian Seldes on Empathy and Cruelty in Directing Actors | KNPB Channel 5 Video | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Seldes did not like to be intimidated while working, and did not intimidate her students.
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The Empathy Project on Typography Served

The Empathy Project on Typography Served | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
The Empathy Project is a collaborative, participatory art project initiated by Paul Rucker and Curated by Marcus Civin at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) Baltimore. It invites participants to explore their experiences with empathy through visual art, writing, installations, performances etc. Many classes added an assignment for the students in the institute to participate in the project where a wide variety of work was created, from collaborative installations to anonymous written posts. The project itself is a sum of all these parts and serves to celebrate the diversity that exists among any community of people. 
When i was brought on the team to design the identity and collateral for the project I was faced with a few specific problems that I must try to solve:
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Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling

Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Many business people have already discovered the power of storytelling in a practical sense – they have observed how compelling a well-constructed narrative can be. But recent scientific work is putting a much finer point on just how stories change our attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors.


As social creatures, we depend on others for our survival and happiness. A decade ago, my lab discovered that a neurochemical called oxytocin is a key “it’s safe to approach others” signal in the brain. Oxytocin is produced when we are trusted or shown a kindness, and it motivates cooperation with others. It does this by enhancing the sense of empathy, our ability to experience others’ emotions.


Empathy is important for social creatures because it allows us to understand how others are likely to react to a situation, including those with whom we work.


by Paul J. Zak 


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Major benefits for students who attend live theater, study finds: theater enhance literary knowledge, tolerance and empathy

Major benefits for students who attend live theater, study finds: theater enhance literary knowledge, tolerance and empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Field trips to live theater enhance literary knowledge, tolerance and empathy among students, according to a study published this week by researchers in the University of Arkansas Department of Education Reform.


The research published in Education Next examines the impact on students of attending high-quality theater productions of either Hamlet or A Christmas Carol.


The researchers found that viewing the productions leads to enhanced knowledge of the plot, increased vocabulary, greater tolerance and improved ability to read the emotions of others.


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Two years ago, researchers found significant benefits in the form of knowledge, future cultural consumption, tolerance, historical empathy and critical thinking for students assigned by lottery to visit Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

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Karen B Wehner's curator insight, October 23, 2014 10:17 AM

Really interesting to see evidence that tolerance and empathy rise even in students who watch (vs perform) theater. 

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UCLA Department of Art | Exhibitions: Compassion Fatigue

UCLA Department of Art | Exhibitions: Compassion Fatigue | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The UCLA New Wight Biennial, Compassion Fatigue, will present work from 16 international emerging artists using installation, performance, video, photography and sound to enable intimate ways of viewing political crisis.


Curated by UCLA Department of Art graduate students Damir Avdagic and Abigail Collins.

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