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STUDY: Physician Empathy and Listening: Associations with Patient Satisfaction and Autonomy

STUDY: Physician Empathy and Listening: Associations with Patient Satisfaction and Autonomy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Purpose: Motivational Interviewing (MI) is used to help patients change their behaviors. We sought to determine if physician use of specific MI techniques increases patient satisfaction with the physician and perceived autonomy.

 

Conclusions: When physicians used reflective statements, patients were more likely to perceive high autonomy support. When physicians were empathic, patients were more likely to report high satisfaction with the physician. These results suggest that physician training in MI techniques could potentially improve patient perceptions and outcomes.

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Empathy and HealthCare
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Newspaper Front Page: All Sections

Newspaper Front Page: All Sections | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy And Health Care Conference http://j.mp/N98AoS

Empathy Cafe Magazine 
Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings and
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Thanks so much.
Edwin Rutsch, Editor
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

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Study: The relationship between physician empathy and disease complications: an empirical study of primary care physicians and their diabetic patients

Study: The relationship between physician empathy and disease complications: an empirical study of primary care physicians and their diabetic patients | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
PURPOSE:
To test the hypothesis that scores of a validated measure of physician empathy are associated with clinical outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus.


METHOD:
This retrospective correlational study included 20,961 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus from a population of 284,298 adult patients in the Local Health Authority, Parma, Italy, enrolled with one of 242 primary care physicians for the entire year of 2009. Participating physicians' Jefferson Scale of Empathy scores were compared with occurrence of acute metabolic complications (hyperosmolar state, diabetic ketoacidosis, coma) in diabetes patients hospitalized in 2009.


CONCLUSIONS:
These results suggest that physician empathy is significantly associated with clinical outcome for patients with diabetes mellitus and should be considered an important component of clinical competence.

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Study: Physicians' empathy and clinical outcomes for diabetic patients.

Study: Physicians' empathy and clinical outcomes for diabetic patients. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
PURPOSE:To test the hypothesis that physicians' empathy is associated with positive clinical outcomes for diabetic patients.METHOD:
A correlational study design was used in a university-affiliated outpatient setting. Participants were 891 diabetic patients, treated between July 2006 and June 2009, by 29 family physicians. Results of the most recent hemoglobin A1c and LDL-C tests were extracted from the patients' electronic records. The results of hemoglobin A1c tests were categorized into good control (<7.0%) and poor control (>9.0%). Similarly, the results of the LDL-C tests were grouped into good control (<100) and poor control (>130). The physicians, who completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy in 2009, were grouped into high, moderate, and low empathy scorers. Associations between physicians' level of empathy scores and patient outcomes were examined.RESULTS:
Patients of physicians with high empathy scores were significantly more likely to have good control of hemoglobin A1c (56%) than were patients of physicians with low empathy scores (40%, P < .001).


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_mellitus

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For Cancer Patients, Empathy Goes a Long Way - New York Times

For Cancer Patients, Empathy Goes a Long Way - New York Times | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
At a scary time for patients, too few doctors ask about feelings, a new study finds.


For instance, a patient would say, “I’m scared,” and the doctor would go off on a “scientific riff” about the disease, Dr. Tulsky said, adding, “We saw that a lot.”


The doctors don’t lack empathy, he said. They just have trouble expressing it. 


By DENISE GRADY

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Why This Anti-Rape Workshop-Running College Bro Says Empathy Is The Most Important Idea Of 2015

Why This Anti-Rape Workshop-Running College Bro Says Empathy Is The Most Important Idea Of 2015 | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Eric Barthold believes that we need to develop our ability to take another person's perspective.


I would love to see our education system value actively build students' ability to empathize and take others' perspective. The lack of empathy is particularly obvious in today's script of masculinity for young men and boys of all ages. In a society still often directed by men, the separation between ourselves and the "other" is inherent in how we define being male and therefore boys in particular have trouble understanding what it would feel like to be in someone else's shoes, so to speak.  
 

If our world placed more value on being empathetic we could lessen the many the tensions behind many pressing issues in today's society, from environmental conservation to all forms of social justice and injustice (race, gender, class, and sexuality), simply by having the ability to actively understand another person's experience and perspective.

by Rachel Signer
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Doctor, Shut Up and Listen: Doctors are evaluated for technical skills, but not for having empathy.

Doctor, Shut Up and Listen: Doctors are evaluated for technical skills, but not for having empathy. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A doctor’s ability to explain, listen and empathize has a profound impact on a patient’s care.


Yet, as one survey found, two out of every three patients are discharged from the hospital without even knowing their diagnosis. Another study discovered that in over 60 percent of cases, patients misunderstood directions after a visit to their doctor’s office. And on average, physicians wait just 18 seconds before interrupting patients’ narratives of their symptoms. Evidently, we have a long way to go.


Three years ago, my colleagues and I started a program in Harrisburg designed to improve doctors’ communication with their patients. This large urban hospital system serves a city with a population of about 50,000, together with the surrounding metropolitan area of more than 550,000 people.


By NIRMAL JOSHI

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Denise Silber's curator insight, January 7, 1:44 AM

An unending task to introduce empathy into the current health system. We must ask ourself how to change the factors in the system that block empathy from happening naturally... Many things indeed.

 
Pål Dobrin's curator insight, January 9, 5:36 AM

Läkare utvärderas efter deras tekniska färdigheter, men inte efter deras empatiska förmågor. Det kanske är otillräckligt med tanke på den tydliga kopplingen mellan läkarens empatiska förmåga och patienters tillfrisknande?  Läkare som förklarar diagnoser, lyssnar uppmärksamt och känner in är värda att uppskattas lite extra!

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Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike

Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

The ability to read and reflect back facial emotion is the most basic skill of communicating empathy. This crucial skill allows health professionals to let patients know that we truly understand and care, and allows patients to let their caretakers know they are appreciated.

As a practicing physician for many decades and as a teacher of psychiatric interviewing for my entire professional life, I have found that physicians sometimes need to work to develop this skill. I have tested many groups of students and found that reading and reflecting facial emotion is more difficult for medical students than, for example, acting students....


 This is a major conceptual contribution we can offer from psychoanalysis, and no medical school curriculum can afford to ignore this teaching of empathy and identification with the patient.


In time, I hope to use the videos to teach residents and nurses as well.  I recently learned that the “Making Faces” video will soon be required viewing in a Narrative Medicine course for Medical, Dental, Nursing and Public Health students taught by Rita Charon. I am deeply gratified that our effort will find all these audiences and become an essential ingredient in their development of clinical empathy. 


David V. Forrest, M.D 

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Scott Langston's curator insight, January 4, 9:54 PM

Emotion research

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Dr. Helen Riess on Empathy, Healthcare and Life by Chuck Wolfe

Dr. Helen Riess on Empathy, Healthcare and Life by Chuck Wolfe | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Changes in healthcare have led to pressures on providers to spend less time with patients resulting in less time for questions, empathy and compassion.


Helen Riess, M.D., a Harvard Medical Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, and Chief Scientist and Chairman of Empathetics, is one person working hard to reverse this trend. Dr. Riess's company teaches empathy to doctors and other healthcare professionals often leading to very positive outcomes.


A very empathetic person herself, Dr. Riess shares insights beyond healthcare including the role of empathy in life in general and insightful suggestions for helping others achieve success.



Culture of Empathy Builder:  Helen Riess

http://cultureofempathy.com/references/Experts/Others/Helen-Riess.htm



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Compassion Fatigue: The Cost Some Workers Pay for Caring - The Epoch Times

Compassion Fatigue: The Cost Some Workers Pay for Caring - The Epoch Times | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
People who experience compassion fatigue are taking on the issues they witness without an appropriate outlet.
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The Importance Of Empathy In A Relationship

The Importance Of Empathy In A Relationship | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
The importance of empathy in relationships is hotly debated. Can a relationship survive without empathy? Let's find it out.


Relationships go through varied emotional states. Though all of them have their own importance, sadness is one of the most important states a person in a relationship goes through. When your significant other is in some pain, you need to be there for them not only physically but also mentally and emotionally.


This is where emotional quotient comes in, the capability to understand what your partner is going through. It can be a state of happiness or sadness or some other feeling.


Many relationships fall apart just because there is no empathy in the relationship. Empathy is what, at the end of the day, makes two individuals in love become one.

by: Anirudh Narayanan


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For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients

For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Give therapists and psychiatrists information about the biology of a mental disorder, and they have less — not more — empathy for the patient, a new Yale study shows.

The findings, released Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, challenge the notion that biological explanations for mental illness boost compassion for the tens of millions of Americans who suffer from mental-health problems.  

Conventional wisdom suggests that biological explanations for psychiatric symptoms should reduce the blame patients receive for their behavior by making genes and brain cells the culprits. This, in turn, should increase feelings of compassion.

In a series of studies, U.S. clinicians read descriptions of patients whose symptoms were explained using information that focused on either genetics and neurobiology or on childhood experiences and stressful life circumstances. Among other questions, the clinicians were asked how much compassion they felt for the individual, an essential element of therapy.

The clinicians consistently expressed less empathy and compassion for the patient when his or her symptoms were explained using biological factors, the researchers found.


By Bill Hathaway

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 4, 2014 3:53 PM

This won't be good news for Psychiatrists who emphasize treatment by medication. -Lon

Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:00 AM

Surprising results...

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Scientific Literature Review Shows Health Care Delivered with Kindness and Compassion Leads to Faster Healing, Reduced Pain | Business Wire

Scientific Literature Review Shows Health Care Delivered with Kindness and Compassion Leads to Faster Healing, Reduced Pain | Business Wire | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Research presented today by neurosurgeon Dr. James R. Doty, M.D., at the inaugural Compassion and Healthcare Conference at Fort Mason shows that health care delivered with kindness not only reduces the duration and severity of the common cold1, but can also lead to improved patient outcomes, including faster healing of wounds2, and a reduction in pain3 and anxiety4...



In some instances, the statistical significance of kindness-oriented care on improved outcomes was “larger than the effect of aspirin on reducing [a heart attack] or smoking on male mortality.”


The research found that kinder care and better information sharing as a result of compassionate practices can lead to a range of improved health outcomes, including:

  • Faster healing of wounds,
  • reduced pain,
  • reduced anxiety,
  • reduced blood pressure,
  • shorter hospital stays, and
  • even shorter duration and severity of the common cold.
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Aimee Devlin's curator insight, November 28, 2014 6:28 AM

Surprise surprise! Of course healthcare given with compassion and love helps us heal quicker!

Ginny Dillon's curator insight, January 9, 6:10 PM

The science of kindness:

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Healthcare IT: User Empathy Comes First - InformationWeek

Healthcare IT: User Empathy Comes First - InformationWeek | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Health IT professionals need to fully understand the needs of clinicians and end-users in order to design software that truly works.


And the mindset I want to discuss

is "customer empathy."


Merriam-Webster suggests that a mindset is a "mental attitude or inclination." In my view, empathy is about caring for people and having a deep desire to help them. What is the inclination of your organization? Customer empathy is an attitude and an action. To deliver great products that delight customers, we must be sensitive to the customers' feelings, thoughts, experiences, and environment. We need to observe these things because so much of this is implicitly understood versus explicitly described..


Todd Dunn


image - Hippocrates

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Oxytocin Improves Empathy in Frontotemporal Dementia

Oxytocin Improves Empathy in Frontotemporal Dementia | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Intranasal administration of oxytocin twice daily for 1 week was safe and well tolerated and showed preliminary signs of improvement in symptoms of apathy and loss of empathy in patients with frontotemporal dementia, according to a new study.


The study, published in the January 13 issue of Neurology, was led by Elizabeth C. Finger, MD, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada


Dr. Finger explained to Medscape Medical News that frontotemporal dementia is the second most common cause of presenile dementia. "It typically starts in the 50s or 60s and appears to have a different pathology to Alzheimer's, with loss of empathy being the hallmark symptom in the most common subtype — known as behavioral variant."

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Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model

Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
This study demonstrated that therapeutic empathy has a moderate-to-large causal effect on recovery from depression in a group of 185 patients treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).


The authors simultaneously estimated the reciprocal effect of depression severity on therapeutic empathy and found that this effect was quite small. In addition, homework compliance had a separate effect on clinical recovery, over and above the effect of therapeutic empathy.


The patients of novice therapists improved significantly less than did the patients of more experienced therapists, when controlling for therapeutic empathy and homework compliance. Ss who terminated therapy prematurely were less likely to complete the self-help assignments between sessions, rated their therapists as significantly less empathic, and improved significantly less.


Ss with borderline personality disorder improved significantly less, but they rated their therapists as just as empathic and caring as other patients. The significance of these findings for psychotherapy research, treatment, and clinical training is discussed.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depression_(mood)

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Study: Perception of empathy in the therapeutic encounter: effects on the common cold.

Study: Perception of empathy in the therapeutic encounter: effects on the common cold. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
To evaluate the effects of patient-practitioner interaction on the severity and duration of the common cold.


METHODS:
We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 719 patients with new cold onset. Participants were randomized to three groups: no patient-practitioner interaction, "standard" interaction or an "enhanced" interaction. Cold severity was assessed twice daily. Patients randomized to practitioner visits used the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) measure to rate clinician empathy. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and neutrophil counts were obtained from nasal wash at baseline and 48 h later.


CONCLUSIONS:
When patients perceive clinicians as empathetic, rating them perfect on the CARE tool, the severity, duration and objective measures (IL-8 and neutrophils) of the common cold significantly change.

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Associations between Medical Student Empathy and Personality: A Multi-Institutional Study

Associations between Medical Student Empathy and Personality: A Multi-Institutional Study | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
More empathetic physicians are more likely to achieve higher patient satisfaction, adherence to treatments, and health outcomes. In the context of medical education, it is thus important to understand how personality might condition the empathetic development of medical students.


Single institutional evidence shows associations between students' personality and empathy. This multi-institutional study aimed to assess such associations across institutions, looking for personality differences between students with high empathy and low empathy levels.

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Cleveland Clinic: Patient Experience, Empathy Innovation Summit 2015

Cleveland Clinic: Patient Experience, Empathy Innovation Summit 2015 | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

As caregivers entrusted with helping people, improving the patient experience is our collective responsibility. Success comes from the ability to work together, network, share best practices and challenge each other to identify new ways to practice.


Many of the best solutions for challenges are found at the front lines of the caregiver-patient relationship, and bringing people together to share and network ensures that we all have access to the latest innovations. Patient experience is not about enhancing satisfaction - it is about transforming the way medicine is delivered.


Patient experience is a dynamic issue not only for healthcare CEOs, physicians, nursing executives and industry leaders; it’s an issue for everyone in the industry. No provider can afford to offer anything less than the best clinical, physical and emotional experience to patients and families. As patients become savvier, they judge healthcare providers not only on clinical outcomes, but also on their ability to be compassionate and deliver excellent, patient-centered care.


As the world’s largest independent summit exclusively focused on improving the patient experience, the 2014 Patient Experience: Empathy + Innovation Summit attracted more than 2,100 attendees from 49 states and 39 countries (click here to see the 2014 agenda).

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6 Habits of Highly Empathetic Nurses

6 Habits of Highly Empathetic Nurses | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
6 Habits of Highly Empathetic Nurses a Guest Post by Trisha C. Fronczek MS, RN-BC, CCRN


What I gave all day was Empathy. Merriam-Webster defines empathy as “the feeling that you understand and share another person’s experiences and emotions: the ability to share someone else’s feelings” 


In nursing, we do this a lot. We use therapeutic communication to speak with our patient and their loved ones about their diagnosis, treatment and plan of care. Sometimes it is a blur for them and us. We hope we have given them everything they need to prevent a readmission. Other times, we feel we go over everything twelve times and still a decision or plan cannot be formulated.

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Compassionate Houston – Register for Compassion Cultivation Training

Compassionate Houston – Register for Compassion Cultivation Training | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

 Welcome to Compassion Cultivation Training:

Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is a nine-week program designed to develop the qualities of compassion and kindness for oneself and for others. CCT integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion.


 What is Compassion?

We will broaden our understanding of compassion as we progress through the program. In the beginning, we can say that compassion action involves an awareness of someone’s suffering, accompanied by a heart response and the urge to help end the suffering. Later in the course, we will explore the idea that compassion is an emergent process that arises out of the interaction of non-compassion processes from attentional and affective domains, intention and insight, and embodiment and engagement.

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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, December 31, 2014 8:42 AM

This is wonderful!  I hope you have many sign-ups for this course!

 

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Flexible empathy - the key to resilience?

Flexible empathy - the key to resilience? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Empathy has long been recognised as a critical component of good nursing or medical practice but in talking with healthcare audiences we often hear confused ideas. What’s the difference between empathy and compassion?


Does too much empathy lead to burnout? How does empathy relate to the technical knowledge and skill that’s also so important in healthcare? Can we measure how empathetic a health professional is?

New research is clarifying these questions, as we heard during the ‘Compassion Week’ in San Francisco in November – a whole week of conferences about the science of compassion, compassion in healthcare, and compassion in the workplace and community.


=====================
So what is “flexible empathy”?

============

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Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring - The Conversation AU

Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring - The Conversation AU | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Health and social workers often choose their profession because they want to help people. But seeing trauma and suffering on a regular basis can have a deep impact on these workers.
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Take a Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes: How Empathy Can Help

Take a Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes: How Empathy Can Help | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

What did this patient need? Empathy. Empathy is what helps us to better understand what another person is experiencing, or, as the old saying puts it, to walk a mile in another person’s shoes. Social determinants of health—where you live, your income, your community and social network, your level of education and your access to health care—contribute to overall health and wellbeing...


Developing Empathy

These suggestions are a few steps you can take now to increase your empathy:

  • First and foremost, learn to listen when someone is talking to you. Try not to think about something else or prepare a response while the person is still talking. Give the person and what he is saying your full attention. Focus on the words and the person’s body language.
  • Communicate. Elliot M. Hirsch, M.D., a physician writing about empathy on the American Medical Association Journal of Ethics website, wrote, “A doctor may be listening carefully to a patient, but the only way for the patient to know that is for the doctor to reflect that he understands the patient's concerns; i.e., to respond empathically.”
  • Keep a journal to record your feelings and observationsAn article in Nursing Times provides detailed suggestions for keeping a journal.
  • Act as if. Even when you aren’t capable of empathizing, acting as if you are may be perceived by the patient as empathy. You also may be able to act your way into actually feeling empathetic.
  • Get to know the community around you. The more kinds of people you know, the better you will be able to understand those you come in contact with through your work.
  • Educate yourself in the arts. Music, literature and the visual arts are centered on who we are as human beings and how we interact, which is the basis of empathy.
  • Practice compassion. Be kind, express gratitude and go out of your way to help others as much as you can.
  • Understand the difference between pity and empathy...

Image http://bit.ly/hZGXA5
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CEC – Dr Robin Youngson - Empathy (Sept 2014) - YouTube

This video focuses on the role of empathy, and how empathy impacts on safety and patient outcomes. This video is presented by Dr Robin Youngson, Robin is an anaesthetist in New Zealand, internationally renowned for his leadership in strengthening compassion in healthcare.


He is the CoFounder of HEARTSinHEALTHCARE.com, a global social movement for health professionals, students, patient activists and all those passionate about rehumanising healthcare. Robin was recorded speaking at the Clinical Excellence Commission, Sydney Australia.


Culture of Empathy Builder Robin Youngson

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/Robin-Youngson.htm 

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Three books by doctors on greed, empathy and end-of-life care

Three books by doctors on greed, empathy and end-of-life care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Educators worry that physicians’ stressful training — focused on technology, information and time management — might stunt their ability to gauge patients’ emotions and inhibit them from discussing difficult subjects, such as a patient’s wishes at the end of life.


Most of the beginning medical school students whom I teach are altruistic and caring, but they wonder whether medical school and residency will grind the empathy out of them.


BEING MORTAL

Medicine and What  Matters in the End

By Atul Gawande


DOCTORED

The Disillusionment of an American Physician

By Sandeep Jauhar



INTERNAL MEDICINE
A Doctor’s Stories

By Terrence Holt


By Susan Okie

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Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike - The Arnold P. Gold Foundation

Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike - The Arnold P. Gold Foundation | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

The ability to read and reflect back facial emotion is the most basic skill of communicating empathy. This crucial skill allows health professionals to let patients know that we truly understand and care, and allows patients to let their caretakers know they are appreciated.

As a practicing physician for many decades and as a teacher of psychiatric interviewing for my entire professional life, I have found that physicians sometimes need to work to develop this skill. I have tested many groups of students and found that reading and reflecting facial emotion is more difficult for medical students than, for example, acting students.


by David V. Forrest, MD

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