Empathy and HealthCare
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Empathy and HealthCare
- CultureOfEmpathy.com
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Compassionate Houston – Register for Compassion Cultivation Training

Compassionate Houston – Register for Compassion Cultivation Training | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

 Welcome to Compassion Cultivation Training:

Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is a nine-week program designed to develop the qualities of compassion and kindness for oneself and for others. CCT integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion.


 What is Compassion?

We will broaden our understanding of compassion as we progress through the program. In the beginning, we can say that compassion action involves an awareness of someone’s suffering, accompanied by a heart response and the urge to help end the suffering. Later in the course, we will explore the idea that compassion is an emergent process that arises out of the interaction of non-compassion processes from attentional and affective domains, intention and insight, and embodiment and engagement.

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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, December 31, 2014 8:42 AM

This is wonderful!  I hope you have many sign-ups for this course!

 

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Flexible empathy - the key to resilience?

Flexible empathy - the key to resilience? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Empathy has long been recognised as a critical component of good nursing or medical practice but in talking with healthcare audiences we often hear confused ideas. What’s the difference between empathy and compassion?


Does too much empathy lead to burnout? How does empathy relate to the technical knowledge and skill that’s also so important in healthcare? Can we measure how empathetic a health professional is?

New research is clarifying these questions, as we heard during the ‘Compassion Week’ in San Francisco in November – a whole week of conferences about the science of compassion, compassion in healthcare, and compassion in the workplace and community.


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So what is “flexible empathy”?

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Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring - The Conversation AU

Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring - The Conversation AU | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Health and social workers often choose their profession because they want to help people. But seeing trauma and suffering on a regular basis can have a deep impact on these workers.
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Take a Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes: How Empathy Can Help

Take a Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes: How Empathy Can Help | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

What did this patient need? Empathy. Empathy is what helps us to better understand what another person is experiencing, or, as the old saying puts it, to walk a mile in another person’s shoes. Social determinants of health—where you live, your income, your community and social network, your level of education and your access to health care—contribute to overall health and wellbeing...


Developing Empathy

These suggestions are a few steps you can take now to increase your empathy:

  • First and foremost, learn to listen when someone is talking to you. Try not to think about something else or prepare a response while the person is still talking. Give the person and what he is saying your full attention. Focus on the words and the person’s body language.
  • Communicate. Elliot M. Hirsch, M.D., a physician writing about empathy on the American Medical Association Journal of Ethics website, wrote, “A doctor may be listening carefully to a patient, but the only way for the patient to know that is for the doctor to reflect that he understands the patient's concerns; i.e., to respond empathically.”
  • Keep a journal to record your feelings and observationsAn article in Nursing Times provides detailed suggestions for keeping a journal.
  • Act as if. Even when you aren’t capable of empathizing, acting as if you are may be perceived by the patient as empathy. You also may be able to act your way into actually feeling empathetic.
  • Get to know the community around you. The more kinds of people you know, the better you will be able to understand those you come in contact with through your work.
  • Educate yourself in the arts. Music, literature and the visual arts are centered on who we are as human beings and how we interact, which is the basis of empathy.
  • Practice compassion. Be kind, express gratitude and go out of your way to help others as much as you can.
  • Understand the difference between pity and empathy...

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CEC – Dr Robin Youngson - Empathy (Sept 2014) - YouTube

This video focuses on the role of empathy, and how empathy impacts on safety and patient outcomes. This video is presented by Dr Robin Youngson, Robin is an anaesthetist in New Zealand, internationally renowned for his leadership in strengthening compassion in healthcare.


He is the CoFounder of HEARTSinHEALTHCARE.com, a global social movement for health professionals, students, patient activists and all those passionate about rehumanising healthcare. Robin was recorded speaking at the Clinical Excellence Commission, Sydney Australia.


Culture of Empathy Builder Robin Youngson

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/Robin-Youngson.htm 

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Three books by doctors on greed, empathy and end-of-life care

Three books by doctors on greed, empathy and end-of-life care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Educators worry that physicians’ stressful training — focused on technology, information and time management — might stunt their ability to gauge patients’ emotions and inhibit them from discussing difficult subjects, such as a patient’s wishes at the end of life.


Most of the beginning medical school students whom I teach are altruistic and caring, but they wonder whether medical school and residency will grind the empathy out of them.


BEING MORTAL

Medicine and What  Matters in the End

By Atul Gawande


DOCTORED

The Disillusionment of an American Physician

By Sandeep Jauhar



INTERNAL MEDICINE
A Doctor’s Stories

By Terrence Holt


By Susan Okie

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Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike - The Arnold P. Gold Foundation

Facial emotion workout video helps patients and physicians alike - The Arnold P. Gold Foundation | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

The ability to read and reflect back facial emotion is the most basic skill of communicating empathy. This crucial skill allows health professionals to let patients know that we truly understand and care, and allows patients to let their caretakers know they are appreciated.

As a practicing physician for many decades and as a teacher of psychiatric interviewing for my entire professional life, I have found that physicians sometimes need to work to develop this skill. I have tested many groups of students and found that reading and reflecting facial emotion is more difficult for medical students than, for example, acting students.


by David V. Forrest, MD

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Studies Show Physician Empathy Increases Patient Satisfaction and Outcomes

Studies Show Physician Empathy Increases Patient Satisfaction and Outcomes | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

PRNewswire--- Is empathy a core component of "evidence-based medicine?"  One prominent researcher and author in the area of empathy in patient care argues that the answer is unequivocally "yes" and says that it can and should be evaluated, taught and sustained, as studies show a high correlation between patient satisfaction and outcomes with empathy scores.  

Mohammadreza Hojat, Ph.D., research professor of psychiatry and human behavior and director of the Jefferson Longitudinal Study at the Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, presented on "Empathy in the Realm of Evidence-Based Medicine," during a presentation co-hosted by the Cleveland Clinic at the  American Osteopathic Association's OMED 2014, the Osteopathic Medical Conference & Exposition in Seattle.


Can empathy be taught?

Dr. Hojat says the good news is that empathy can be learned.  He cited several studies where the Jefferson Scale was used, that shows enhanced empathy with a targeted education program.  "Additional reinforcement could sustain or improve empathy among residents," he said.


Some examples include:   


--The Rocking Chair Project:  A free rocking chair was given to indigent expectant mothers by residents in family medicine; the resident had to take the chair to the mother in her home and talk about newborn care too.  Going into the home, talking to the mom and assembling the chair prevented a decline of empathy by residents.  For those residents who didn't participate, their empathy declined. 


--Shadowing:  Those residents who shadowed patients in the emergency room helped to maintain their empathy of residents vs. those whose empathy declined.


--Aging Game:  Students at Midwestern University Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine and Chicago College of Pharmacy were coached to perform the role of an elderly patient.  Other medical students had to sit and watch.  This increased empathy for all students by watching and/or participating in the role play for 15 minutes vs. those who didn't participate.


--Narrative Skills Training:  The Cleveland Clinic did a study on narrative skills training with residents that showed that while there was no significant improvement in empathy, residents did not lose empathy vs. those who weren't exposed to training.


--Movie Clips Experiment:   When residents were shown video clips of patient-physician encounters selected from three movies and analyzed positive and negative aspects of each interaction, their empathy score increased.  


The caveat in empathy training:  when researchers followed up with the subjects from the Aging Game and Movie Clip studies months later; most had lost what they gained, and empathy was not sustained. 


"There needs to be additional reinforcement for empathy to be sustained; if no reinforcement, empathy gains will be lost," Dr. Hojat said.


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A social neuroscience perspective could increase empathy in physicians, enhance patient care

A social neuroscience perspective could increase empathy in physicians, enhance patient care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
In the October issue of World Psychiatry, neuroscientists and UC Berkeley psychiatrist Jodi Halpern contribute a perspective on the need for increased research on the components of empathy, in order to develop interventions and programs designed to increase the levels of empathy in clinical practice.

According to the article, clinical empathy is increasingly being seen as an important element of quality health care, and has been associated with improved patient satisfaction, increased adherence to treatment, and fewer malpractice complaints.


As well, for doctors, higher levels of empathy have led to decreased burnout, personal distress, depression, and anxiety, along with increased life satisfaction and psychological well-being.


By Amabelle Ocampo

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Study: Interventions to cultivate physician empathy: a systematic review

Study: Interventions to cultivate physician empathy: a systematic review | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Author:

Zak Kelm

James Womer

Jennifer K Walter

Chris Feudtner


Physician empathy is both theoretically and empirically critical to patient health, but research indicates that empathy declines throughout medical school and is lower than ideal among physicians.


In this paper, we synthesize the published literature regarding interventions that were quantitatively evaluated to detect changes in empathy among medical students, residents, fellows and physicians. 


Conclusions: Physician empathy appears to be an important aspect of patient and physician well-being. Although the current empathy intervention literature is limited by a variety of methodological weaknesses, a sample of high-quality study designs provides initial support for the notion that physician empathy can be enhanced through interventions.

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I never understood the loss of empathy during medical training. Until now.

I never understood the loss of empathy during medical training. Until now. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

I never understood the trend of loss of empathy during medical training. Until now.


See, when you’re in so much pain that if you thought of your life past this moment, this singular point in time, you would implode, pain seems as natural as breathing. Pain is part of life. Pain is nothing. You can’t stop to nurse your own wounds, you can’t talk about how much you hurt. So how could you possibly have enough room in your broken heart to take on someone else’s pain? So you don’t. You cover your bases and survive. You become that machine that you swore you’d never become.


Because it hurts too much to feel, and it’s so much easier to float than swim.



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Aus Nurse Educator's curator insight, September 24, 2014 6:08 PM

If you only read one blog post today, please make it this one.

 

An anonymous author writes eloquently from her perspective as a medical student, but the emotions, experiences and turmoil could so easily have been expressed by healthcare professionals from other disciplines.

 

Powerful stuff.  

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EmpathyWorks: Comment to a Paulene Chen Column

EmpathyWorks: Comment to a Paulene Chen Column | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

I hope this does not sound self-serving. My entire professional life as a physican, teacher, researcher, consultant has been devoted to promoting empathy and patient and family-centered care within the context of clinician-patient interactions.


I am passionate about empathy.


So, soon after getting an e-mail with a link to Dr. Chen’s moving column, I eagerly read every word of every comment listed here. I found myself resonating with many comments….especially by those of you who were willing to share their stories about their experience as patients and family members.


by Michael Goldstein
July 18, 2009

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Missed Opportunities for Interval Empathy in Lung Cancer Communication

Missed Opportunities for Interval Empathy in Lung Cancer Communication | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Background
Empathy is important in patient-physician communication and is associated with improved patient satisfaction and adherence to physicians' recommendations.



 

Methods 
 To evaluate empathic opportunities and physician responses, we conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of 20 audiorecorded, transcribed consultations between patients with lung cancer and their thoracic surgeons or oncologists, from a larger observational study of 137 patients in a Veterans Affairs hospital in the southern United States. Using qualitative analysis, we collaboratively developed themes and subthemes until saturation. Then, each transcript was coded, using grounded theory methods, until consensus was achieved, counting and sequentially analyzing patient empathic opportunities and physician responses.


Diane S. Morse, MD;
Elizabeth A. Edwardsen, MD;
Howard S. Gordon, MD
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Dr. Helen Riess on Empathy, Healthcare and Life by Chuck Wolfe

Dr. Helen Riess on Empathy, Healthcare and Life by Chuck Wolfe | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Changes in healthcare have led to pressures on providers to spend less time with patients resulting in less time for questions, empathy and compassion.


Helen Riess, M.D., a Harvard Medical Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, and Chief Scientist and Chairman of Empathetics, is one person working hard to reverse this trend. Dr. Riess's company teaches empathy to doctors and other healthcare professionals often leading to very positive outcomes.


A very empathetic person herself, Dr. Riess shares insights beyond healthcare including the role of empathy in life in general and insightful suggestions for helping others achieve success.



Culture of Empathy Builder:  Helen Riess

http://cultureofempathy.com/references/Experts/Others/Helen-Riess.htm



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Compassion Fatigue: The Cost Some Workers Pay for Caring - The Epoch Times

Compassion Fatigue: The Cost Some Workers Pay for Caring - The Epoch Times | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
People who experience compassion fatigue are taking on the issues they witness without an appropriate outlet.
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The Importance Of Empathy In A Relationship

The Importance Of Empathy In A Relationship | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
The importance of empathy in relationships is hotly debated. Can a relationship survive without empathy? Let's find it out.


Relationships go through varied emotional states. Though all of them have their own importance, sadness is one of the most important states a person in a relationship goes through. When your significant other is in some pain, you need to be there for them not only physically but also mentally and emotionally.


This is where emotional quotient comes in, the capability to understand what your partner is going through. It can be a state of happiness or sadness or some other feeling.


Many relationships fall apart just because there is no empathy in the relationship. Empathy is what, at the end of the day, makes two individuals in love become one.

by: Anirudh Narayanan


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For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients

For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Give therapists and psychiatrists information about the biology of a mental disorder, and they have less — not more — empathy for the patient, a new Yale study shows.

The findings, released Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, challenge the notion that biological explanations for mental illness boost compassion for the tens of millions of Americans who suffer from mental-health problems.  

Conventional wisdom suggests that biological explanations for psychiatric symptoms should reduce the blame patients receive for their behavior by making genes and brain cells the culprits. This, in turn, should increase feelings of compassion.

In a series of studies, U.S. clinicians read descriptions of patients whose symptoms were explained using information that focused on either genetics and neurobiology or on childhood experiences and stressful life circumstances. Among other questions, the clinicians were asked how much compassion they felt for the individual, an essential element of therapy.

The clinicians consistently expressed less empathy and compassion for the patient when his or her symptoms were explained using biological factors, the researchers found.


By Bill Hathaway

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 4, 2014 3:53 PM

This won't be good news for Psychiatrists who emphasize treatment by medication. -Lon

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Scientific Literature Review Shows Health Care Delivered with Kindness and Compassion Leads to Faster Healing, Reduced Pain | Business Wire

Scientific Literature Review Shows Health Care Delivered with Kindness and Compassion Leads to Faster Healing, Reduced Pain | Business Wire | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Research presented today by neurosurgeon Dr. James R. Doty, M.D., at the inaugural Compassion and Healthcare Conference at Fort Mason shows that health care delivered with kindness not only reduces the duration and severity of the common cold1, but can also lead to improved patient outcomes, including faster healing of wounds2, and a reduction in pain3 and anxiety4...



In some instances, the statistical significance of kindness-oriented care on improved outcomes was “larger than the effect of aspirin on reducing [a heart attack] or smoking on male mortality.”


The research found that kinder care and better information sharing as a result of compassionate practices can lead to a range of improved health outcomes, including:

  • Faster healing of wounds,
  • reduced pain,
  • reduced anxiety,
  • reduced blood pressure,
  • shorter hospital stays, and
  • even shorter duration and severity of the common cold.
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Aimee Devlin's curator insight, November 28, 2014 6:28 AM

Surprise surprise! Of course healthcare given with compassion and love helps us heal quicker!

Ginny Dillon's curator insight, January 9, 2015 6:10 PM

The science of kindness:

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Healthcare IT: User Empathy Comes First - InformationWeek

Healthcare IT: User Empathy Comes First - InformationWeek | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Health IT professionals need to fully understand the needs of clinicians and end-users in order to design software that truly works.


And the mindset I want to discuss

is "customer empathy."


Merriam-Webster suggests that a mindset is a "mental attitude or inclination." In my view, empathy is about caring for people and having a deep desire to help them. What is the inclination of your organization? Customer empathy is an attitude and an action. To deliver great products that delight customers, we must be sensitive to the customers' feelings, thoughts, experiences, and environment. We need to observe these things because so much of this is implicitly understood versus explicitly described..


Todd Dunn


image - Hippocrates

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Emotional performance of 'Wit' teaches empathy

Emotional performance of 'Wit' teaches empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

English professor Sally Shigley and Lauren Fowler, professor of psychology and neuroscience, starting working together, looking at the research on the neuroscience of empathy, and how to use it to train those in the medical field to be empathetic, Fowler said.


They measured students’ level of empathy after reading the play and then also after watching the 2001 HBO film of the same name. Fowler said before-and-after differences were much larger for those who saw the movie, since “When you see the person you sympathize more than if you just read about it.


Sonja Carlson

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Building Empathy in Healthcare

Building Empathy in Healthcare | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
A Q&A with Dr. Helen Riess of Harvard Medical School about her efforts to spread empathy among health care workers.


Communication in the doctor’s office is a hot topic right now. As a review by Health Affairs notes, “the quality of physician-patient interactions in primary care has been declining.”


On the positive side, effective communication is a powerful—albeit underutilized—instrument in healthcare’s toolbox. It’s associated with higher patient satisfaction, better adherence to medications, lower likelihood of mistakes, and fewer malpractice cases. It even affects patient health outcomes; a review of research concluded that effective physician-patient communication improves patients’ emotional health, symptoms, physiologic responses, and pain levels.


In particular, empathy is a critical component of communication that has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Empathy in a clinical context is the physician’s ability to understand patients’ emotions, which can facilitate more accurate diagnoses and more caring treatment.


This differs from sympathy, or sharing patients’ emotions, which instead can hinder objective diagnoses and effective treatment.


By Kasley Killam 

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3 Ways Empathy Is Driving Successful Innovations In Health

3 Ways Empathy Is Driving Successful Innovations In Health | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

From human-centered design to the lean startup approach, methods to develop innovative products and services emphasize the importance of understanding what customers really need. Here are some lessons in innovation that social entrepreneurs have learned from empathizing with their customers:

Don’t let technology take the wheel: “

I used to think that the problem lies in technology. What we realized eventually was that the problem does not merely lie in the technology, but the psychology,” says Ashoka Fellow Swapnil Chaturvedi in a recent video on his work...


Shift how the community sees you: ...


by Archana Sinha 

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Creating a More Empathetic Medical Workforce

Creating a More Empathetic Medical Workforce | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
In the changing face of medicine, we need to incorporate more empathy and human experience into medical education in order to create more compassionate doctors....


Empathy matters. For improved patient satisfaction and for improved medical outcomes. Physicians who were trained with empathetic skills in a fertility clinic were found to have higher patient satisfaction and communication skills than those who were not trained. Patients were more satisfied with the information given to them by their physician, as well as with how the physician explained that information to them.


Likewise, another study found that patients treated by physicians with higher empathy ratings were more likely to have better medical treatment outcomes than those treated by physicians with lower empathy ratings.

So what can be done to prevent this deterioration
in empathy in medical trainees?


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The Next Revolution in Health Care? Empathy | Paul Rosen

Paul Rosen, MD, a pediatric rheumatologist, serves as the Clinical Director of Service and Operational Excellence at Nemours. He received a masters of public health degree from Harvard University and a masters of medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University.


[Talks about the need for empathy in the hospitals.]

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For Some Doctors, Empathy Is in Short Supply

For Some Doctors, Empathy Is in Short Supply | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Doctors are missing their cues when it comes to opportunities to empathize with the plight of their cancer patients, a new study suggests.


While doctors are able to address such concerns as medication issues, missed appointments, or pain, they tended to skirt "existential" issues, such as questions dealing with life and death, which are of paramount importance to most patients, the study authors said.


By Amanda Gardner

Sept. 22, 2008 

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