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Empathy and Compassion
The Empathy Movement Magazine: The latest news about empathy and compassion from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathetic Children More Likely To Effectively Manage Stress, Behave Prosocially

Empathetic Children More Likely To Effectively Manage Stress, Behave Prosocially | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Carlo found that empathetic adolescents were more likely to use problem-focused coping, which aims to reduce or eliminate the source of the stress.


These adolescents also were more likely to perform prosocial behaviors that benefit others, such as volunteering, donating money or helping friends with problems. Conversely, emotionally unstable, impulsive adolescents relied more on emotion-focused coping tactics such as venting, avoidance or distraction, and they showed more frequent signs of aggression.

"Empathetic kids are generally very good at regulating their emotions and tend not to lose their tempers,"


Carlo said. "When you're good at regulating your emotions, you're less concerned about yourself and more considerate of other people. On the other hand, impulsive children are more self-focused and have difficulty engaging in problem-focused coping."

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Mass. General Hospital teaches doctors empathy

Mass. General Hospital teaches doctors empathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
according to Dr. Helen Riess, a psychiatrist who directs the hospital’s Empathy and Relational Science Program. “Empathy training enhances relationships, increases job satisfaction and improves patient outcomes,” says Riess. And with 60 percent more doctors than a decade ago reporting burnout, today’s physicians and patients have more than ever to gain from the program.

Riess’s curiosity about empathy in medicine began 10 years ago, when she noticed a trend among her own patients: Many were upset over encounters with doctors. There was, for example, the overweight woman proud of her effort in losing 15 pounds.


Bella English 

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Core Skill: Intuitive Focusing

Core Skill: Intuitive Focusing | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
What is intuitive focusing and how you can use it to solve problems, understand feelings, get past creative blocks or overcome stress or anxiety.


Here are Gendlin’s six steps for use of this inner, meditation-like problem-solving process in a self-help way:


  1. Clearing a Space: Setting aside the jumble of thoughts, opinions, and analysis we all carry in our minds, and making a clear, quiet space inside where something new can come. You can take an “inventory” of all the issues you are carrying inside, setting each aside for later attention, or you can find the way inside through relaxation exercises.
  2. Getting a Felt Sense: Asking an open-ended question like “What is the feel of this whole thing (issue, situation, problem, intuition)?” and, instead of answering with one’s already-known analysis, waiting silently as long as a minute for the subtle, intuitive, “bodily feel” of “the whole thing” to form.
  3. Finding a Handle: carefully looking for some words or an image that begin to capture the “feel of the whole thing,” the Felt Sense, The Creative Edge: “It’s ‘jumpy;’” “It’s scared;” “It’s like the dew of a Spring morning;” “It’s like macaroni and cheese – comforting,” “It’s like jet propulsion! Something new that needs to spring forth!”
  4. Resonating and Checking: taking the Handle words or image and holding them against the Felt Sense, asking “Is this right? Is it ‘jumpy’?”, etc. Finding new words or images if needed until there is a sense of “fit” – “Yes, that’s it. ‘Jumpy.’”
  5. Askingasking open-ended questions like “And what is so hard about that?” or “And why does that have me stuck?” or “What was so beautiful about that moment?” or “And how does this apply to everything else?” and, again, instead of answering with already-known analysis, waiting silently for the whole-body-sense, the Felt Sense, to arise. 
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An Awfully Big Blog Adventure: The Empathy Map (Part 1)

An Awfully Big Blog Adventure: The Empathy Map (Part 1) | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy Maps may be familiar to those who work in copywriting or marketing, but the concept was a totally new one to me.


The map above might look a little like an alien's guide to the human condition, as if an intelligent life form has just been beamed down to Earth and wants to analyse and categorise the amorphous seething mass of firing neurons inside a human mind - but essentially, an Empathy Map is a business tool; a “guide to putting yourself in your customer’s head,” in order to sell something to a consumer more effectively by triggering their emotions.


As a salesperson, you would make a list in all the four boxes - what does this person think (when they see my product) - what do they see? How do they feel, and what then will they do (with my product?)


 by Tess Berry-Hart

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▶ Episode 39 - Dr. Marco Iacoboni - Mirroring People

MARCO IACOBONI, MD PhD is Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Director of the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Lab at the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center. Iacoboni is a neurologist and neuroscientist originally from Rome, Italy.


He joined the faculty of the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center at UCLA in 1999. He is also author of the book “Mirroring People: The Science of Empathy and How We Connect with Others“

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‘Empathy education’ already exists in Christianity

‘Empathy education’ already exists in Christianity | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Mary Kenny considers the Golden Rule as a means to combat bullying 


It is being proposed by UNESCO that one of the ways to combat bullying in schools is to teach “empathy” to young children. The dictionary definition of empathy is “the power of entering into the feelings of another person and understanding them fully”. 

If children were taught to be empathetic from an early age, perhaps there would be less bullying in schools, colleges and, later, workplaces. If you can put yourself in someone else’s shoes, then you would be less likely to bully or boss them unkindly. That is the view put forward by Prof. Pat Dolan from the UNESCO child and family research centre at Galway.

Who would argue with the notion of ‘empathy education’? Don’t most responsible parents try to teach it anyway when they say to a child who has been unkind to a sibling or playmate – “How would you feel if someone did that to you?”

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Empathy Yawn Test. The Yawn-O-Meter (How Long Can You Last?)

How long can you last before yawning?
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Really? Yawning Is Contagious Between Dogs and Their Owners: yawn is thought to signal empathy.

Really? Yawning Is Contagious Between Dogs and Their Owners: yawn is thought to signal empathy. | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Yawning when you see someone else yawn is thought to signal empathy. About half of all people do it contagiously. Now researchers have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: Dogs, too, are contagious yawners.

In a series of experiments carried out on two dozen breeds, from poodles to pit bulls, researchers found that when a dog watched either a stranger or its owner yawn, the dog was far more likely to yawn in response to its owner. Dogs in the study also demonstrated that, for the most part, they could not be duped. They responded frequently to genuine yawns, but less so to fake yawns in which people simply stretched and then opened and closed their mouths without making noise.

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eurucamp 2015 - Cultivating Empathy by Dajana and Leslie Hawthorn

When considering how to design products, teams or even common every day household objects, empathy doesn't end up on the required features list.


Yet, without empathy, teams with enormous technical skills can fail in their quest to deliver quality products to their users. Incredible projects fail to create communities because they don't exercise it. Fail at empathy and your chances of failing at everything skyrocket.


Contrary to what you may have heard, empathy is not something you're innately born with - it's a skill that can be learned, cultivated, refined and taught to others. In this presentation, your lovely co-speakers will discuss the value of empathy, how you can cultivate in yourself and your organizational culture, and conclude with concrete steps for leveling up in your interactions with your fellow human beings.


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Violent video games linked to increased aggression: decrease in prosocial behaviour and empathy

Violent video games linked to increased aggression:  decrease in prosocial behaviour and empathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Playing violent video games can lead to an increase in aggressive behaviour and decrease in prosocial behaviour and empathy, according to a new report.


Researchers said that violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players but insufficient evidence exists about whether the link extends to criminal violence or delinquency.


“The research demonstrates a consistent relation between violent video game use and increases in aggressive behaviour, aggressive cognitions and aggressive affect, and decreases in prosocial behaviour, empathy and sensitivity to aggression,” according to a new American Psychological Association (APA) task force report.


By: PTI |

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, August 16, 12:34 AM

Although violent video games don't necessarily result in violent action, this study indicates one result of [;auomg violent video games is increased aggression and less empathy.  Even though a causal effect to violence isn't shown, a lot of antisocial and self-destructive behaviors are, and those can be damaging without the public drama looked for in the popular media. -Lon

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Empathy in the Face of Diversity - NZ Human Rights Commission's 11th Diversity Forum

Empathy in the Face of Diversity - NZ Human Rights Commission's 11th Diversity Forum | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy in the Face of Diversity is the theme behind the Human Rights Commission’s 11th Diversity Forum to be held in Auckland this September.

“We live in one of the most ethnically diverse nations on the planet – it’s also one of the most peaceful,” said Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy.

“Whether we pass this legacy on to our children and their children is up to us. If we take the time to walk in someone else’s shoes, to see the world through someone else’s eyes we will be a stronger, more resilient nation and we will be better people.”

“The forum’s free and it’s open to everyone so I encourage Kiwis, particularly Aucklanders to come and learn and build with us.”

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What is the Relationship Between Stress and Empathy?

What is the Relationship Between Stress and Empathy? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

A recent Greater Good article about anxiety and empathy triggered controversy among readers. But what does the science say?


On Monday, we published a research brief, “How Anxiety Reduces Empathy,” that provoked some conversation and disagreement among readers.


“I thought empathy increases stress and anxiety,” wrote one person—especially, she believed, if we empathize with people in a bad situation that we don’t have the power to improve. Another wrote on our Facebook page, “My anxiety tends to be worry over how my actions affect others.”


Certainly, it makes intuitive sense that a stressed-out, anxious, uncertain society might be a less empathic and caring one. But it helps to have scientific evidence to bolster the case for public and workplace policies that might make our lives less stressful—and thus, we hope, more compassionate.


By Jeremy Adam Smith 

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Are You Choosing Empathy? - GovLoop

Are You Choosing Empathy? - GovLoop | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

There has been quite a bit of conversation about empathy over the past few years. Studies show its benefits in improving relationships, team dynamics and the social development of our children.


At the same time, a body of research reveals that empathy often fails when needed most, like after large scale disasters and with people who are not the same race or background as us. A recent New York Times article entitled “Empathy is Actually a Choice” reveals an interesting and important aspect of the emotion, which can explain some of its perceived failures: empathy is only limited to the extent that we, ourselves, choose to limit it.

The article walks through a number of studies that expose our ability to choose when we employ empathy


Blair Corcoran de Castillo

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What role does Empathy play in a libertarian society? - Zero Aggression Project

What role does Empathy play in a libertarian society? - Zero Aggression Project | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Libertarianism is inherently empathetic. Libertarians respect individual conscience in all things. We imagine how others…

...

Empathy feels good, achieves good, and returns good.

This makes empathy a better social strategy than bullying force. Empathy fosters positive reciprocity.  By contrast, The State…

  • Threatens and initiates force
  • Is funded by violent means


These practices negate empathy. They replace positive reciprocity with political warfare. If you lose the political contest then I impose on you, and vice versa. Empathetic libertarianism rejects political warfare in favor of non-violent persuasion, cooperation, and tolerance.

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Focused Listening Role in Creative Edge Focusing Self-Help and Peer to Peer Programs

Focused Listening Role in Creative Edge Focusing Self-Help and Peer to Peer Programs | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
When an individual is using the Intuitive Focusing Skill to problem solve at The Creative Edge, Focused Listening by another person can help carry the whole process of articulation forward.

Based on Carl Rogers' Reflective or Empathic Listening, Focused Listening, the second Core Skill of Creative Edge Focusing ™, is the most simple yet most powerful communication skill you will ever learn.

When people are trying to communicate, struggling with  overwhelming emotion, or trying to solve  problems, nothing is more helpful than hearing their own words back. Then, they can use Intuitive Focusing to check inside and ask themselves, “Is that what I am trying to say?”, “Is that really what I am feeling?” “Is that the right image for this creative problem I am solving?”


  Kathy McGuire

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If you don’t catch yawns you’re probably a psychopath

If you don’t catch yawns you’re probably a psychopath | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

If you ever want to test whether or not someone is a potential psychopath, this is one way to do it. Just yawn at them. If they catch the yawn and copy you, then you’re okay. But if they don’t, then you might need to start worrying.

People who don’t react to someone else’s yawn by yawning are, according to scientists, more likely to be psychopaths.

Researchers from Baylor University, Texas, published their findings from a sample of 135 people in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

Brian Rundle, a student involved in the study, told the Times: One of the biggest lines of evidence is that (contagious yawning is) very much related to empathy.


Richard Hartley-Parkinson 

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Stress, Brain Wiring, Empathy and Morality

Stress, Brain Wiring, Empathy and Morality | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Chronic stress might affect empathy and morality through its effect on neurotransmitters within the brain, primarily serotonin. Although the relationship between serotonin and depression is complex, we find that most effective anti-depressant medications work by raising levels of serotonin, implying that serotonin availability is defective in depression...


Greater levels of empathy, happiness and moral behaviour within occupations where stress and burnout are common for instance, within the military, medical and corporate sectors, could have wide-ranging implications on health, international relations and diplomacy whilst at the same time improving the moral compass of society as a whole.


By Mithu Storoni

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Test your empathy! - The Yawn Test

Test your empathy! -  The Yawn Test

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

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Study: Contagious yawning and psychopathy

Study: Contagious yawning and psychopathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Psychopathy is characterized by a general antisocial lifestyle with behaviors including being selfish, manipulative, impulsive, fearless, callous, possibly domineering, and particularly lacking in empathy. Contagious yawning in our species has been strongly linked to empathy.


We exposed 135 students, male and female, who completed the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R), to a yawning paradigm intended to induce a reactionary yawn. Further, we exposed males to an emotion-related startle paradigm meant to assess peripheral amygdalar reactivity.


We found that scores on the PPI-R subscale Coldheartedness significantly predicted a reduced chance of yawning. Further, we found that emotion-related startle amplitudes were predictive of frequency of contagious yawning.


These data suggest that psychopathic traits may be related to the empathic nature of contagious yawning in our species.


Brian K. Rundle
Vanessa R. Vaughn
Matthew S. Stanford
Baylor University, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, 


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You could be a psychopath if you don't yawn, a study has found - people with low empathy levels don't copy the gestures of others

You could be a psychopath if you don't yawn, a study has found - people with low empathy levels don't copy the gestures of others | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

You could be a psychopath if you don't yawn: Scientists reveal that people with low empathy levels don't copy the gestures of others 

  • Scientists have found that the more psychopathic characteristics people have, the less they are affected by 'contagious yawning'
  • Researchers from Baylor University tested students for anti-social traits
  • Those who scored highly on 'cold-heartedness' were less likely to yawn when shown video clips of facial expressions



By Anthony Joseph

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Psychopaths Don't Yawn Around Others, So It's Time To Start Testing Your Friends

Psychopaths Don't Yawn Around Others, So It's Time To Start Testing Your Friends | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

by PAMELA J. HOBART


Everyone knows someone who just might be a real psychopath, but how can you be certain? A recent study puts one more tool into your detection arsenal:psychopaths are much less likely to yawn around others who have yawned, basically because they're lacking in the empathy that makes the yawn contagion mechanism work. So while it's not exactly conclusive, that troublesome coworker's failure to yawn around the water cooler before an early-morning meeting might actually mean something after all.


A team of psychologists from Baylor University in Texas used experimental participants (both male and female) given a psychopathy personality test to investigate how yawning is related to empathy. 

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Human Rights Commission :: Empathy in the face of diversity: The 2015 Diversity Forum

Human Rights Commission :: Empathy in the face of diversity: The 2015 Diversity Forum | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
The 11th annual New Zealand Diversity Forum, organised by the Human Rights Commission, will be held at AUT’s Auckland campus on 9 September 2015. The theme for the 2015 forum is 'Empathy in the face of Diversity'.

The forum is a platform which brings together individuals and organisations to share ideas and good practice on cultural diversity and positive race relations.

Originally created in 2004 following a community response to the desecration of two Jewish Cemeteries, the Diversity Forum is organised and facilitated by the New Zealand Human Rights Commission with a focus on practical action.
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Louisville, JCPS bring compassion to schools

Louisville, JCPS bring compassion to schools | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Jefferson County Public Schools has a new pilot program to focus on the health and wellness of students, hoping to equip them with skills not so familiar in classrooms around the country.


“Louisville and other JCPS schools will serve as the national site for the Compassionate Schools Project,” Mayor Greg Fischer said.

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How Anxiety Reduces Empathy

How Anxiety Reduces Empathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

A study suggests that stress and surprise can hurt your ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes.


In a series of six studies with more than 1,300 total participants, researchers from universities including Harvard and Columbia induced anxiety, anger, disgust, surprise, or pride in participants by asking them to write about a past experience when they felt one of those emotions. ... Then, participants were tested on perspective taking. ...


Now more than ever, we need to train our empathy muscles. Consider trying these science-based practices, particularly if you’re prone to anxiety:

  • Active Listening: Listen better and express active interest in your conversational partner, making them feel heard and understood.
  • Shared Identity: Think of someone who is very different from you, and then try to imagine all the ways that you two are similar—seeing them as an individual, not an out-group member.
  • Mindful Breathing: Focus attention on your own breathing to cultivate awareness.



By Kira M. Newman 

Image, The Scream http://j.mp/1N4y0o0 

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