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Empathy and Compassion
The Empathy Movement Magazine: The latest news about empathy and compassion from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students

Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

There are very few “provable” things in arts education, but one thing that has been “proven” over the years in educational research is that theatre education increases empathy in students.


Empathy, or the ability to understand another person’s feelings or circumstances, is a critical skill for an actor. It is how we are able to portray people who are very different from ourselves. We must imagine what it would be like to undergo the circumstances of the play in order to honesty represent those emotions and conditions on stage in a believable way.
 

Empathy in the classroom does not need to rise to the level of believable impersonation, but increased empathy is very helpful to students as they relate to each other and to their worlds. By integrating drama into the classroom, teachers can help students increase their empathy and meet non-arts curricular goals as well.

 

Joan Weber Director, Education Division, Creativity & Associates 

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Raising Compassion - Max Planck Institute

Raising Compassion brings together a diverse group of neuroscientists, mental health professionals, and Buddhist monks in a remarkable exchange between science, art, and contemplative practice. In a series of informal conversations about compassion, initiated by neuroscientist Tania Singer and artist Olafur Eliasson, the protagonists discuss the public perception of compassion, talk about compassion-training programs at various research centres, relate their experiences about working with prisoners and in hospitals, and promote the practical uses of compassion-training in dealing with social and political issues.

 

Commissioned by the Max Planck Institute and produced by Studio Olafur Eliasson, Raising Compassion arose from the multidisciplinary workshop “How to Train Compassion”, organized by Prof. Dr. Tania Singer, director of the Department of Social Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute, Leipzig, and hosted, in July 2011, at Studio Olafur Eliasson, in Berlin.

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Cultivating Compassion, by Paul Gilbert | DailyGood

Cultivating Compassion, by Paul Gilbert | DailyGood | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Why do we need compassion?

We need compassion because life is hard. We are all susceptible to diseases and injuries. Every one of us has a lifespan that had a start and will have an end. Just like you, I am vulnerable to disease. Just like you, I could have a blood test tomorrow that says my life is going to end. Just like you, I could hear that my son has been killed in a car crash.

 

Because these things can happen to any of us at any time, we’re all in this together. No one—no one—escapes. And the more we work together, the more we can make this journey of suffering bearable. The Buddhist tradition puts it this way: “Just like me, you want to be happy; just like me, you want to be free of suffering.” That recognition of common fear and yearning is the basis for compassion.

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To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Click here to go to the Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page
http://bit.ly/dSXjfF
More about Empathy and:
* Animals  http://bit.ly/heHOFR
* Art  http://bit.ly/kazC0N
* Compassion  http://bit.ly/dSEr3G
* Education http://bit.ly/jV91lN
* Empaths  http://bit.ly/eapWwd
* Health Care   http://bit.ly/hxdqCw
* Learning Empathy and Compassion  http://bit.ly/gLhxJH

* Justice   http://j.mp/WcrKMY
* Teaching    http://bit.ly/gLhxJH
* Work   http://bit.ly/dL0GRE
* Self-empathy/compassion  http://bit.ly/lyuRyn 

Curriculum    http://bit.ly/nIUwYx
* etc.

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates. It also helps us rise in the rankings and gives us more exposure on Scoop.it. 

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Thanks so much. Edwin Rutsch, Editor 

Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

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The Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare: Yes, Empathy Can Be Taught!

The Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare: Yes, Empathy Can Be Taught! | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

This Compassion in Action webinar will be presented by Helen Riess, MD, Director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Riess is also the Co-Founder, Chief Scientific Officer and Chairman of Empathetics LLC, which offers scientifically based empathy education.

 

She has devoted her career to teaching and research on the neuroscience and art of the patient-doctor relationship. Her research team conducts translational research utilizing the neuroscience of emotions and has demonstrated the effectiveness of empathy training in pilot studies and through a randomized controlled trial. Dr. Riess is an internationally recognized speaker, researcher and clinician. Her work has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and other leading medical journals. She is a graduate of the Boston University School of Medicine and did her residency and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital.

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Nurses 'emotionally exhausted' by demand for compassion

Nurses 'emotionally exhausted' by demand for compassion | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Constant demand to appear compassionate leaves nurses feeling stressed and exhausted

 

Symptoms of emotional exhaustion include tiredness, low moods, withdrawal from friends and family, and feeling unable to ‘switch off’ after work.

 

Trainees were asked questions about the extent to which their jobs required them to empathise with people and express sympathy. They were also asked whether or not stress had affected their personal lives. Researchers found that those who often displayed compassion were much more likely to become emotionally exhausted.

The findings will raise questions about the provision of support for the 350,000 nurses and trainees in the NHS.

 

 

By Joe Kavanagh

 

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Raising Compassion: The Most Important Thing Parents Can Do

Raising Compassion: The Most Important Thing Parents Can Do | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

The ultimate solution to the problem of childhood narcissism lies within the parent's sense of self-connection, worth and acceptance.

 

All of us want our children to grow up to be compassionate. We want them to contribute positively to the well-being of others, so that they leave the world a better place than they found it.

 

It's this desire that causes parents to constantly urge children "not to be selfish," to "wait their turn," and to "share" with other children. We believe that the more we demand this of our children, the greater the chance they will develop into selfless adults.

 

Little do we realize that this is highly ineffective.

 

TED TALK http://youtu.be/QM_PQ2WUD2k

Conscious Parenting: Shefali Tsabary at TEDxSF 

 

 

Shefali Tsabary Clinical Psychologist & Author,
'The Conscious Parent' and Out of Control - Why Disciplining Your Child Doesn't Work and What Will' 

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Criminal justice reforms: 'Empathy has been sidelined'

Criminal justice reforms:  'Empathy has been sidelined' | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Erwin James: Clive Martin, campaigner for groups that support offenders and their families says that Chris Grayling's massive reorganisation of rehabilitation will not in itself cut reoffending

 

Does he feel the system has lost faith in the possibility of rehabilitation? "I think the system has become all stick and no carrot," he says. "In my experience working in prison education, I met very few people who didn't want to change. But in public discourse and the way the issues are presented to the public by policymakers, there seems to be a sense that we have given up on hope. We talk about 'the market' and 'programmes', but we don't talk about people. For whatever reason, empathy has been pushed to the sidelines. We don't feel empathetic towards groups of people – even fairly obvious groups such as unemployed young people, who we tend to blame for their situation.

 

"If you look at what most people in prison were before they were labelled 'offender', they were people who had terrible upbringings, people who were abused, people with mental health problems – they're the sort of people we would normally tend to have some sympathy with, but we don't. We see them as a drain, a burden, rather than a part of us. We forget that there but for the grace of God go so many of us ."

 

Erwin James

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The Need for Listening and Empathy in Journalism - Josh Stearn

The Need for Listening and Empathy in Journalism - Josh Stearn | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Two recent blog posts raise this question: Just how often do news organizations actually listen to their communities?

 

So the question of empathy has two facets: empathy in the newsroom, and the empathy our stories foster in our readers. What connects these two elements is the act of listening.

 

Listening to Community


Better reflecting and responding to our communities has to start with better listening.

While journalism is rooted in interviews, there’s not enough discussion about the need to listen to our communities. And by listening, I don’t mean simply talking to sources or listening for story leads; I mean listening for the sake of understanding and building truly reciprocal relationships with readers.

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Ira Glass, Religion And The Empathetic Power Of Storytelling

Ira Glass, Religion And The Empathetic Power Of Storytelling | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

The following is an interview with Ira Glass, host of This American Life.


What is the value of telling stories?


The story is a machine for empathy. In contrast to logic or reason, a story is about emotion that gets staged over a sequence of dramatic moments, so you empathize with the characters without really thinking about it too much. It is a really powerful tool for imagining yourself in other people's situations.

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An Antidote to the Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

An Antidote to the Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Let’s not idealize emotional intelligence. Like any other human skill set – IQ, hacking skills, strength – it can be used for self-serving ends or for the common good, as addressed in Adam Grant's recent article for The Atlantic titled The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence....

 

Then there’s empathic concern, sensitivity to other people’s needs and the readiness to help if need be. Workers with such concern are the good citizens of any organization, the ones everyone else knows can be counted on to help when the pressure is on. Among leaders, those with empathic concern create a “secure base,” the sense that your boss has your back, will support and protect you as needed, and gives you the security to take risks and try new ways of operating – the key to innovation.

 

This is the kind of empathy that serves as an antidote to the dark side of emotional intelligence – the manipulative use of talents in EI in the service of one’s own interest, and at the expense of others. Narcissists, Machiavellians and sociopaths all do this, as I’ve detailed in Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence. A Norwegian study found that men who lacked empathic concern in childhood were far more likely than others as adults to end up as felons in prison.

 

Daniel Goleman 

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John Michel's curator insight, January 7, 2014 12:06 AM

Empathic concern means we care about the well-being of the people around us. It’s the opposite motivation of the self-serving types who use whatever influence or other empathy abilities solely in their own interests – the Bernie Madoffs among us.

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The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” Anyone can cultivate empathic skills—even psychopaths.

The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” Anyone can cultivate empathic skills—even psychopaths. | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Anyone can cultivate empathic skills—even psychopaths.

 

In daily life, calling someone a “psychopath” or a “sociopath” is a way of saying that the person is beyond redemption. Are they?

 

When neuroscientist James Fallon accidentally discovered that his brain resembled that of a psychopath—showing less activity in areas of the frontal lobe linked to empathy—he was confused. After all, Fallon was a happily married man, with a career and good relationships with colleagues. How could he be beyond redemption?

 

Additional genetic tests revealed “high-risk alleles for aggression, violence and low empathy.” What was going on? Fallon decided he was a “pro-social psychopath,” someone whose genetic and neurological inheritance makes it hard for him to feel empathy, but who was gifted with a good upbringing and environment—good enough to overcome latent psychopathic tenden.

 

Greater Good 

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On the difference between Empathy and Radical Connection

On the difference between Empathy and Radical Connection | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Nurturing the courage and conviction to transform these systems is just as important as developing more empathy in ourselves and others. The idea of radical connection captures this combination perfectly. It’s a visceral recognition that we are part of something larger that urges us to act for the whole community’s benefit, and not just for those few individuals with whom we empathize directly.

 

Cultivating more empathy among people with different interests and perspectives is certainly one part of this story: as social animals, human beings can mirror the feelings of others without much conscious effort, even if they have radically-different life experiences, values and beliefs. From a social justice perspective this is great news. As Caring across Generations and other campaigns have shown, it means that connections can be built and barriers transcended that might otherwise seem impossible.

 

But this form of empathy also has its limits. In a recent New Yorker Article, Paul Bloom shows how empathy can become a reflexive, reactive emotion that short-changes the actions and understanding required in the pursuit of social justice

 

On its own, empathy focuses attention on the story of an individual at the expense of the larger landscape of inequality. Embedding empathy in the individualistic cultures that dominate modern life makes it less likely that people will interrogate the systems, structures and institutions that affect the lives of individuals in different ways.

 

Michel Bauwens

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Cleveland Clinic - Patient Experience: Empathy & Innovation Summit May 18-21, 2014 - Cleveland, Ohio

Cleveland Clinic - Patient Experience: Empathy & Innovation Summit May 18-21, 2014 - Cleveland, Ohio | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
The 5th Annual Patient Experience: Empathy + Innovation Summit 

May 18-21, 2014
Cleveland, Ohio

Patient Experience: A Key Differentiator

Patient experience has emerged as a dynamic issue for healthcare CEOs, physicians, nursing executives and industry leaders. No provider can afford to offer anything less than the best clinical, physical and emotional experience to patients and families. As patients become savvier, they judge healthcare providers not only on clinical outcomes, but also on their ability to be compassionate and deliver excellent, patient-centered care.

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Empathy: “the process of demonstrating an accurate, nonjudgmental understanding of the other side’s needs, issues, and perspective.

Empathy: “the process of demonstrating an accurate, nonjudgmental understanding of the other side’s needs, issues, and perspective. | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

One of the best chapters ever written on empathy is in Robert Mnookin’s book *Beyond Winning: Negotiating to Create Value in Deals and Disputes* (Mnookin is the head of the Harvard Program on Negotiation.) In the 2nd chapter in his book, titled “The Tension Between Empathy and Assertiveness”. 



Mnookin defines empathy as “the process of demonstrating an accurate, nonjudgmental understanding of the other side’s needs, issues, and perspective.”  He goes on to say that “Empathy does not require people to have sympathy for another’s plight – – to ‘feel their pain.’  Nor is empathy about being nice……. 


Empathizing with someone, therefore, does not mean agreeing with or even necessarily liking the other side.” Mnookin’s chapter is assigned reading in my course in the MBA program at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

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TEACH YOURSELF EMPATHY

TEACH YOURSELF EMPATHY | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Everybody’s suddenly talking about empathy, from the Dalai Lama to agony aunts, from business gurus to happiness experts. And it’s not surprising, since in the last decade neuroscientists have discovered that 98 per cent of us have empathy wired into our brains. The old story that we are basically selfish, self-interested creatures has been debunked. Our selfish inner drives exist side by side with our empathic other half. We are homo empathicus.

 

The problem is that most of us haven’t yet learned how to switch on our neural circuitry and fulfil our empathic potential. And this really matters. Why? Normally we think of empathy – the art of stepping imaginatively into the shoes of another person and looking at the world from their perspective – as something that makes you a more caring and considerate person by expanding your moral universe. But empathy doesn’t just make you good – it’s good for you too. It can help heal broken relationships, make you a more creative person, and expand your wellbeing by forging the human bonds that make life worth living.o what does it take to up your personal empathy quotient? How can empathy play a bigger,  more positive role in your life?


Here are seven tips.


Roman  Krznaric’s book, Empathy: A Handbook for Revolution

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Six Life Lessons from Leo Tolstoy - Lesson 2: Practice Empathy

Six Life Lessons from Leo Tolstoy -  Lesson 2: Practice Empathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Lesson 2: Practice Empathy

 

Tolstoy was one of the great empathic adventurers of the 19th century, displaying an unusual desire to step into the shoes of people whose lives were vastly different from his own. Following the Emancipation of the Serfs in 1861, and influenced by a growing movement across Russia which extolled the virtues of the peasantry, Tolstoy not only adopted traditional peasant dress, but worked alongside the laborers on his estate, ploughing the fields and repairing their homes with his own hands. For a blue-blooded count, such actions were nothing short of remarkable. Although no doubt tinged with paternalism,

 

 

Tolstoy enjoyed the company of peasants and consciously began to shun the literary and aristocratic elite in the cities. He also founded an experimental school for peasant children based on the libertarian and egalitarian ideas of Rousseau and Proudhon, and even taught there himself. Unlike many of his fellow aristocrats who claimed solidarity with rural laborers, Tolstoy believed you could never understand the reality of their lives unless you had a taste of it yourself.

 

by Roman Krznaric, 

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Compassion linked to emotion exhaustion among nurses

Compassion linked to emotion exhaustion among nurses | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Nurses can suffer themselves from being required to display compassion at all times, according to UK researchers.

 

Nurses who were required to display higher levels of compassion were more likely to feel emotionally exhausted, a study by the University of Bedfordshire found. In addition, nurses who had higher levels of empathy felt emotionally exhausted too, the authors said.

 

The findings are based on a sample of 351 nurses who completed a serious of online questionnaires about their lives in work and beyond.

Study author Professor Gail Kinman said: “Displaying compassion and empathy is a fundamental requirement in nursing and is valued by patients and their families. However, this ‘emotional labour’ can affect their wellbeing.

 

“Our research found some support for the idea that emotional support can help break this relationship,” she warned.

 

By Steve Ford

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First Read Minute: What GOP empathy gap means for party, 2014

First Read Minute: What GOP empathy gap means for party, 2014 | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
NBC's Mark Murray and Domenico Montanaro examine the GOP's challenges in talking about income inequality and what it could mean for 2014 and beyond.
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Joan Halifax on Compassion's Edge States and Caring Better

Joan Halifax on Compassion's Edge States and Caring Better | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by all the bad news and horrific pictures in the world. This is a form of empathy, Joan Halifax says, that works against us. The Zen abbot and medical anthropologist has bracing, nourishing thoughts on finding buoyancy rather than burnout in how we work, live, and care. -  


Inside Compassion: Edge States, Contemplative Interventions,


Neuroscience Joan Halifax speaks about the challenge of caregivers who care for those who are seriously ill. Learn about basic research in neuroscience and psychology on mindfulness, compassion, and the effects of stress on the body. 

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Ian Townsend's curator insight, January 8, 2014 4:20 AM

I remember attending workshops with Joan Halifax in the 80s - this is one seriously talented person whose work i always follow.

Brenda Robinson's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:05 AM

Please sign/share if you're so inclined. Thank you. x
http://www.change.org/petitions/ministry-of-education-globally-introduce-a-new-course-called-compassion-for-grade-1-and-grade-12

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EMPATHY ENGINE: Why I Left American Public Media to Start Groundsource

EMPATHY ENGINE: Why I Left American Public Media to Start Groundsource | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

EMPATHY ENGINE’


Before I get to the details of Groundsource, let me explain a bit more background on why empathy is so important to me.

Empathy is a fundamental quality of great journalists. Jose Antonio Vargas, the longtime journalist and famously undocumented immigrant said as much in his recent keynote speech at the Online News Association conference in San Francisco. Journalism “has given me the biggest gift that anybody could ever give me,” he said, “which is the gift of empathy. “Of seeing and listening to people who may not agree with me and who feel different than I do.”

 

In 2003, I helped build a kind of “empathy engine” in the Public Insight Network. I’ve since had the genuine honor to work with a band of visionary misfits and mavericks to build the tools of PIN, a database of more than 180,000 sources, a network of nearly 80 partners newsrooms, and the best practices, to bring shoe-leather journalism into the networked age. Within months of starting PIN, I had access to a daily citizens’ news wire streaming into my inbox, full of personal and often bracingly honest depictions of life as observed at ground level. I was hooked on that feed, and helped others get hooked too.

 

By Andrew Haeg

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In Gaming, A Shift From Enemies To Emotions

In Gaming, A Shift From Enemies To Emotions | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Many of these "empathy games" focus on smaller, more personal stories about everyday people.

 

Some call these "empathy games." They focus on engaging with the player on an emotional level.

 

Ryan Green is taking that to an extreme. His deeply personal project, That Dragon, Cancer, uses the medium of a video game to create an interactive memoir about his experience raising a son with pediatric cancer. The game creates interactive scenes that put the player in Green's shoes during a night at the hospital. It becomes apparent there's nothing the player can do to make the situation better. Just like in real life, sometimes there is no easy answer.

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How kindness-compassion-empathy meditation helps your heart health

How kindness-compassion-empathy meditation helps your heart health | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

When you do a love and kindness meditation, also known as an LKM, it effects the tone and rhythm of your vagus nerve and your heart beat rate. How come hugs are being compared to drugs? Can meditating on compassion and empathy frequently help with heart health? The higher the vagal tone, the better the vagus nerve performs as a regulatory pathway, scientists have explained in a new study of compassion meditation and its effects on the human body.

 

Basic empathy is a biological given. “If you talk with a sad person, you are going to adopt a sad posture, and if you talk to a happy person, by the end you will probably be laughing,” says Emory primatologist Frans de Waal, according to an October 21, 2010 news release, "Are hugs the new drugs?"

 

Anne HartSenior Health Examiner

 

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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:21 AM

Please sign/share if you're so inclined. Thank you. x
http://www.change.org/petitions/ministry-of-education-globally-introduce-a-new-course-called-compassion-for-grade-1-and-grade-12

Jimmy Rodgers's curator insight, January 17, 2014 2:31 PM

This article is about how kindness and compassion can help you have a healthier heart and kindness also bring you kindness. This article will help people have a better life because maybe people will be more kind to others and have a healthier heart and live longer.

James Rodrigue's comment, January 21, 2014 2:17 PM
I agree that being kind to others will likely lead to a longer life. On a related note, the article discusses the importance of empathy which made me think about a video that I recently watched that explains the difference between empathy and sympathy. Check it out! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Evwgu369Jw
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» Living a Compassionate Life

» Living a Compassionate Life | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

By Laura Norman

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.”– The Dalai Lama


Compassion can be defined as one’s emotional response to suffering or unhappiness in another. It also involves an authentic desire to help alleviate that suffering.

 

Why is compassion so important?


Consider compassion’s tremendous benefits for our physical and mental health and our overall well-being. Connecting with others in a meaningful way helps us enjoy better health, speeds up recovery from disease and, based on research by Stephanie Brown, at Stony Brook University and Sara Konrath at the University of Michigan, may even lengthen our lifespan.

 

Living a compassionate life may also boost our well-being by increasing our sense of connection to others. Concern for others involves both an understanding of what another might be feeling and compassionate caring. Since compassionate caring is fostered by face-to-face contact, it’s important that we encourage more physical contact and less virtual contact with one another.

 
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