Empathy and Compa...
Follow
Find
172.4K views | +37 today
Empathy and Compassion
The latest news about empathy and compassion from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Are Overly Compassionate Doctors at Risk of Burnout?

Are Overly Compassionate Doctors at Risk of Burnout? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

By expressing empathy toward clients, many doctors risk becoming extremely invested in clients' well-being and possible future job burnout.

 

Gleichgerrcht assessed how different forms of empathy affected overall well-being in physicians by looking at empathic concern, emotional awareness, personal distress, altruistic behavior, and emotional burnout in a sample of 7, 584 doctors. He found that the doctors who practiced empathic concern and kept their altruism in perspective were more likely to report compassion satisfaction as a result. In contrast, those who reported secondaryposttraumatic stress and burnout as a result of empathy also reported high levels of compassion fatigue. When Gleichgerrcht looked at other risk factors, he found that women were more likely than men to report high levels of alexithymia and distress. Being unable to identify and express their emotions left these participants more vulnerable to feelings of devaluation and negative affect.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Children With Early Signs Of Psychopathy Show No Remorse To Pain

Children With Early Signs Of Psychopathy Show No Remorse To Pain | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Using brain scans, researchers found no empathy in children with conduct problems when shown images of others in pain.

 

Their brain scans revealed little response from the bilateral anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and inferior frontal gyrus. The ACC is particularly responsible for regulating reasoning functions, including empathy, impulse control, and emotion. Past studies show that the bilateral anterior insula exhibits weak responses to emotional faces following alcohol consumption, while the inferior frontal gyrus holds what's called Broca's Area, which is normally damaged in non-fluent aphasiacs or individuals who struggle with getting words out and speak in short sentences.


BY ANSA VARUGHESE 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Using Poetry to Introduce Empathy into Your Child's Life

Using Poetry to Introduce Empathy into Your Child's Life | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Poetry, like empathy, can be undervalued in today’s modern world. Poetry has the capacity to make the audience feel and not just think. Poetry takes the readers on a journey through their own emotional spectrum and that is why it is an art form that parents can find very valuable for their children. In order to appreciate poetry, one has to be open to one’s own empathetic nature, and that in and of itself is an act of social justice--the true power of art. Parents can read poetry with their children to interpret and analyze more complex issues together. Connecting to that part of us that innately understands and appreciates the empathetic state of mind in a wondrously meaningful practice that poetry instills in its readers.


Here are some tips on how to use poetry as a means of introducing empathy into your child’s life.

 

by Toni Nagy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Brain scans can identify psychopaths even in childhood because they have no empathy when seeing people in pain

Brain scans can identify psychopaths even in childhood because they have no empathy when seeing people in pain | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Brain scans can identify psychopaths even in childhood because they have no empathy when seeing people in pain


Researchers at University College London found that children diagnosed with 'conduct problems' react abnormally to seeing people in pain


Regions of the brain affected are those known to play a role in empathy


But expert says it is important to 'view these findings as an indicator of early vulnerability, rather than biological destiny

 

By RACHEL REILLY

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Bully-Proof your Preschooler: EMPATHY

Bully-Proof your Preschooler: EMPATHY | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Bully-Proof your Preschooler – Part 2: EMPATHY
In our last article, Bully-Proof Your Preschooler, we featured tips and signs for helping young children deal with aggressors. Today we’ll take a look at empathy and its role in prevention.


Why empathy matters
Empathy is the ability to understand and identify with another person’s feelings. It includes regulating one’s own emotions and is central to success in social relationships. Children who are empathic are less likely to use aggression.

 

Empathy has to be taught
Although there is evidence that the human brain may be pre-wired for empathy, just ask a group of toddlers to share a toy and you’ll see plenty of evidence that empathy doesn’t come naturally! It has to be taught. That’s why you play a crucial role in the development of empathy skills – starting in infancy.

 

by Linda 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy and Problem Solving : SB Therapy News

Empathy and Problem Solving : SB Therapy News | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Integrating empathy in solving problems with young people
Empathy, from either a helping professional or parent, has been identified as a predictor of positive outcomes (Greenberg et all, 2001), healthy self-development and adaptive self-functioning in young adults (Trumpeter et al, 2008). Integrating empathy in our interactions with young people is both a way to demonstrate respect for them and invest in helping them develop and grow. Following are three ways for a caring adult to incorporate more empathy into interactions with young people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Integral Options Cafe: The Compassionate Brain - The Power of Self-Compassion w/ Kristin Neff

Integral Options Cafe: The Compassionate Brain - The Power of Self-Compassion w/ Kristin Neff | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Kristin Neff, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Texas, Austin, and is the author of Self-Compassion: Stop Beating Yourself Up and Leave Insecurity Behind (Morrow, 2011). She has been practicing Buddhist meditation since 1997, and has co-created a program on Mindful Self-Compassion with her associate Chris Germer at Harvard University.
In addition to her book, she has also created an audio program with Sounds True, Self-Compassion, Step by Step (A Six-Session Training Course for Transforming Your Relationship with Yourself).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Those who choose utilitarian ethics have empathy deficit, study finds Story

Those who choose utilitarian ethics have empathy deficit, study finds Story | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Those who would sacrifice one person to save five others score low on one particular measure of empathy, but not other measures, according to research published this month in the scientific journal PLoS One.

 

The study of 2748 people by Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht of the Institute of Cognitive Neurology in Argentina and Liane Young of Boston College found individuals who experienced low levels of compassion and concern for other people were more likely to embrace utilitarian ethics, which advocates the greatest good for the greatest number — even if that means harming a minority in the process.

 

“Utilitarian moral judgment in the current study was specifically associated with reduced empathy and not with any of the demographic or cultural variables tested,” they wrote in the study. “Moreover, utilitarian moral judgment was determined uniquely by levels of empathic concern, independent of other aspects of empathic responding including personal distress and perspective taking.”

 

By Eric W. Dolan

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

How Can We Help Children Become 'Upstanders' to Bullying?

How Can We Help Children Become 'Upstanders' to Bullying? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

The common denominator of all types of bullying is a lack, or erosion, of empathy. Nurturing empathy, a potential that is present in almost all children, is therefore at the heart of interventions to prevent bullying.

 

In the end, Bazelon raises a larger question: What can we do, as parents, to nurture qualities of empathy and kindness in our children? How can we reduce the risk that our children will get caught up in hurtful teenage drama? How can we help them become "upstanders," not bystanders, to meanness and cruelty?...

 

Here is what I believe is most essential: Empathy begets empathy. As parents, we need to set aside time to listen patiently and empathically to our children and to repair moments of anger and misunderstanding. When we listen with empathy, when children know that their concerns and their grievances will be heard, we open a pathway toward emotional maturity. In these moments, children become less absorbed in defiant thoughts and argument, more open to compromise, and more caring toward others.

 

Listening with empathy, however, is not always easy and should not be confused with permissiveness or indulgence...

 

Kenneth Barish, Ph.D.Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology at Weill Medical College, Cornell University

 

Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Kenneth Barish 
http://j.mp/YnhHvz  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Do Doctors Show Less Empathy Toward Obese And Overweight Patients?

Do Doctors Show Less Empathy Toward Obese And Overweight Patients? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Physicians build less rapport with obese patients, according to a study published in the medical journal, Obesity.  

 

Examples of empathy were defined as use of empathetic words and phrases that showed reassurance and validation of patients’ feelings, such as “I can see how frustrated you are by your slow progress – anyone would be.

 

Other John Hopkins researchers involved in the study included Mary Catherine Beach, M.D., Debra L. Roter, Dr.PH., and Lisa A.Cooper, M.D.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Compassionate Mind - Association for Psychological Science

The Compassionate Mind - Association for Psychological Science | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

What is Compassion?

What is compassion and how is it different from empathy or altruism? The definition of compassion is often confused with that of empathy. Empathy, as defined by researchers, is the visceral or emotional experience of another person’s feelings. It is, in a sense, an automatic mirroring of another’s emotion, like tearing up at a friend’s sadness. Altruism is an action that benefits someone else. It may or may not be accompanied by empathy or compassion, for example in the case of making a donation for tax purposes. Although these terms are related to compassion, they are not identical. Compassion often does, of course, involve an empathic response and an altruistic behavior. However, compassion is defined as the emotional response when perceiving suffering and involves an authentic desire to help.

 

By Emma Seppala

 

In-depth Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Emma Malcolm Seppala

http://j.mp/NdBlho

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Three Kinds of Compassion

Three Kinds of Compassion | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

The starting-point “definition” of compassion is that it is a “wish for sentient beings to be free from suffering.” As many others have noted, the etymology of the English word compassion points to the meaning “to suffer together with.” Learning to “suffer with” another is a very important preparation for developing the “wish to free” a sentient being from suffering: if we can become willing to let the pain of others really touch our hearts, we will be setting the stage for allowing our compassion’s creativity to come forward. That willingness could be nurtured at first by the basic practice of sitting meditation. When we sit, one of the capacities we are developing is not to let our heart of empathy become buried or unnoticed due to our mental chatter. 


by Tyler Dewar

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Behaving like animals: The Bonobo and the Atheist

Behaving like animals: The Bonobo and the Atheist | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
Tessa Kendall reviews Frans de Waal's new book, The Bonobo and the Atheist. How much of our humanist behaviour do we owe to our cousins in the animal kingdom?

 

(de Waal) calls the idea that civilisation and morality are imposed on a violent, immoral, selfish nature Veneer Theory and concludes, "Everything science has learned in the last few decades argues against the pessimistic view that morality is a thin veneer over a nasty human nature."

 

Human morality is "firmly anchored in the social emotions, with empathy at its core" (De Waal, Our Inner Ape). The desire to treat others well comes from altruism which, in turn, comes from empathy...

 

For many years, De Waal's claim that other animals display altruism and empathy was ignored or rejected. What his latest book achieves is to put onto a firm evidential basis the fact that the roots of our social behaviour can be seen in other animals. The question is no longer whether animals have empathy but how it works.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Forensic Psychology: A No-Compassion Zone?

Forensic Psychology: A No-Compassion Zone? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy: It's only human 

The general consensus was that, without some measure of empathy, one cannot hope to understand the subject or the situation. One is left with "an equally problematic perspective that dehumanizes and decontextualizes the evaluation,' in the words of another psychologist.

"There is an orientation toward forensic work that is strikingly cold," noted yet another colleague. "I have seen some highly experienced forensic examiners who use their 'objectivity' with icy precision and thereby fail to establish the kind of rapport necessary to obtain a complete account of the offense or other important information…. The absence of empathy can be just as biasing as too much of it."

 

by Karen Franklin, Ph.D.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Children with behavioural problems under-react to painful images

Children with behavioural problems under-react to painful images | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

When children with conduct problems see images of others in pain, key parts of their brains under-react, according to new research published today in Current Biology. The study, led by researchers at the UCL Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, found these children show reduced responses in three areas of the brain associated with empathy for pain when looking at pictures of others in pain.  This pattern of reduced brain activity upon witnessing pain may serve as a neurobiological risk factor for later adult psychopathy. However the researchers emphasize that not all children with conduct problems are the same and many do not persist with their antisocial behaviour.

 

image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

What if the brains of sociopaths could be fixed?

What if the brains of sociopaths could be fixed? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

A new, riveting study from the University of Chicago, published in JAMA Psychiatry, has shown that people with psychopathy—who lack empathy, are likely to engage in criminal behavior and who are much more likely to be violent—have abnormal brain function.


Researchers examined 80 prisoners in a U.S. correctional facility with “functional MRI,” which shows brain activity, by measuring things like blood flow and oxygen use by brain cells.


They showed them pictures in which people were being attacked or were obviously in pain. And, for the prisoners with high levels of psychopathy, less than normal activity was found in a critical part of their brains linked to emotion—called the amygdala.


 By Dr. Keith Ablow

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Study: Differential Pattern of Functional Brain Plasticity after Compassion and Empathy Training

Study: Differential Pattern of Functional Brain Plasticity after Compassion and Empathy Training | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Although empathy is crucial for successful social interactions, excessive sharing of others' negative emotions may be maladaptive and constitute a source of burnout. To investigate functional neural plasticity underlying the augmentation of empathy and to test the counteracting potential of compassion, one group of participants was first trained in empathic resonance and subsequently in compassion. In response to videos depicting human suffering, empathy training, but not memory training (control group), increased negative affect and brain activations in anterior insula and anterior midcingulate cortex – brain regions previously associated with empathy for pain. In contrast, subsequent compassion training could reverse the increase in negative effect and, by contrast, augment self-reports of positive affect. In addition, compassion training increased activations in a non-overlapping brain network spanning ventral striatum, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and medial orbitofrontal cortex. We conclude that training compassion may reflect a new coping strategy to overcome empathic distress and strengthen resilience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy, Mirror Neurons, and the Empathy Pathology

Empathy, Mirror Neurons, and the Empathy Pathology | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

The process by which one’s affective experience is shared by another person is known as empathy. In order to understand empathy using the scientific method it is imperative to first define empathy.

 

Overview of empathy

 

There are a wide range of definitions of empathy in the literature. 1) The capacity to understand and respond to the unique affective experiences of another person, 2) Similarity between one’s own feelings and those of another person, and 3) Interaction between 2 individuals with one experiencing and sharing the feelings of the other (Decety and Jackson 2006). Within these definitions there are three underlying components; 1) an affective response to the other person, 2) cognitive capacity to take the perspective of another person, and 3) emotional regulation.

 

Simon de Croft
Ethical Technology

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

On Empathy: On Being Ugly

Watch 'On Being Ugly' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2js063a1Suk My video isn't really about the beauty, but I thought it might be nice to add this beautiful...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Walking in Your Shoes: Empathy, Not Love, Makes the Workplace Go Round

Walking in Your Shoes: Empathy, Not Love, Makes the Workplace Go Round | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

“I do not ask the wounded person how he feels, I myself become the wounded person.” ― Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself”   

 

Empathy. Do you have it? Do you live it? Do you experience it? Does it guide you? Many may reflexively say “yes, of course”. But think carefully. I’m not talking about sympathy. I’m not talking about pity. Empathy is what seems to be the most profound of emotions in that it actually leads, I would like to argue, to much better workplaces, and to a much better world in general.   Or at least it can, although just like everything else it can be a double-edged sword.  The news media is saturated this past year, this past week, in some shape or form with stories of empathy. Empathy, even lack thereof, is all around us.

 

By psychologistmimi, 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

PLOS ONE: Low Levels of Empathic Concern Predict Utilitarian Moral Judgment

PLOS ONE: Low Levels of Empathic Concern Predict Utilitarian Moral Judgment | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Is it permissible to harm one to save many? Classic moral dilemmas are often defined by the conflict between a putatively rational response to maximize aggregate welfare (i.e., the utilitarian judgment) and an emotional aversion to harm (i.e., the non-utilitarian judgment). Here, we address two questions. First, what specific aspect of emotional responding is relevant for these judgments? Second, is this aspect of emotional responding selectively reduced in utilitarians or enhanced in non-utilitarians?

 

 

The results reveal a key relationship between moral judgment and empathic concern in particular (i.e., feelings of warmth and compassion in response to someone in distress). Utilitarian participants showed significantly reduced empathic concern on an independent empathy measure. These findings therefore reveal diminished empathic concern in utilitarian moral judges.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy – Can We Afford to be Without It?

Empathy – Can We Afford to be Without It? | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers need to cut costs, collect data and invest in their communities. But emotions are not a commodity and a hospital is not another business. People come to us at the most vulnerable times of their lives. They look to us for compassion. They trust us with their most precious assets – their health and the health of their parents, spouses and children. How could we ever be less than empathetic to anyone who comes through our doors?

 

Hospitals are busy places. Caregivers see thousands of patients every year. There is a danger of forgetting that each patient is an individual, with a unique story and particular fears. We need to keep that from happening. We need to exercise empathy the way we exercise our bodies. We need to study emotional intelligence the way we study for recertification. We need to listen to that patient who is sitting across from us in the examination room and connect with her or him as if we were the only two people in the world.

 

Delos Cosgrove
CEO and President at Cleveland Clinic

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Boston Stronger - Empathy in Action

Boston Stronger - Empathy in Action | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it
The human brain is hard-wired for empathy; in situations like this, we understand why. Helping those who suffer diminishes both their pain, and ours, preserving our fellow humans, ourselves and our species.

 

It was an odd feeling -- walking into Massachusetts General Hospital just days after the Boston Marathon bombings had uprooted our hospital and challenged our staff to the core of their training and their emotional strength. But our lives, however altered, had to continue. In my case, I was to lead an inter-hospital seminar with medical, surgical and psychiatry interns at an annual offsite retreat -- bright young men and women preparing for promising futures in medicine, and our workshop happened to focus on empathy, an essential component of not just the medical profession, but also our collective humanity.

 

As is customary in my workshop, I asked the interns to tell each other a minute-long story of some emotional significance. The task is meant to elicit empathy from our peers, to demonstrate how we convey caring through nonverbal signals, and to remind these burgeoning physicians how vital compassion is to our profession and our interactions with patients, especially considering the fact that research shows a marked decline in empathy that beings in the third-year of medical school....

 

Helen Riess, M.D. is associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. She co-founded Empathetics, LLC, an empathy education company.

 

About Culture of Empathy Builder:  Helen Riess

http://j.mp/12VRhQh ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Project Happiness: Building Social and Emotional Skills in Elementary Students: Empathy

Project Happiness:  Building Social and Emotional Skills in Elementary Students: Empathy | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

This is part seven of the nine-part series from the Project Happiness curriculum. We are looking at important factors that influence the happiness and social and emotional learning of elementary school.

 

How is Empathy Being Developed in Schools?

 

There are many approaches to teaching empathy. Here are ten interesting ways that aspects of empathy are being introduced:...

Start with Teachers: At a recentEduCon Conference, an important issue came up. Teacher burnout increases when teachers are expected to be supportive but receive no emotional support at all. One teacher summarized it well: "How can I have empathy for my students when no one will have empathy for me?" The solution one school adopted was to have regular staff meetings in which everyone sat in a circle and shared how things were going. Teachers felt closer to one another in creating a more supportive environment where others cared about how everyone was feeling.

 

Infants as Educators:...

 

Validation and Trust:...

 

Power of Teamwork:...

 

Grading on Character:...

 

Practice Emotional Literacy:...

 

Befriending the "Other":...

 

Students as "Changemakers":...

 

Service-Learning:...

 

Encourage Empathy at Home:...

more...
Velvet Martin's comment, April 29, 2013 3:24 PM
http://www.rootsofempathy.org/en/what-we-do/about-our-program.html
Sue Blough's comment, May 1, 2013 8:06 PM
This subject is foundational and necessary to becoming fully human. While empathy may be natural for Interpersonal learners, they also need to learn boundaries and positive directions for that empathy. All learning styles can benefit from learning this relational skill.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Develop Empathy & Prosocial Behavior in Children with Online Training Course from CCEI

Develop Empathy & Prosocial Behavior in Children with Online Training Course from CCEI | Empathy and Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy promotes meaningful relationships, better communication, and problem-solving skills. It also promotes greater understanding between people of different backgrounds, and it is an essential building block for a secure, prosperous community. This course examines recent social research into empathy and other “prosocial” behaviors, as well as recommended strategies and practices for guiding young children through the early phases of empathy’s long developmental process. Objectives of this course include understanding the difference between empathy and sympathy, defining the “warm glow effect,” and identifying appropriate strategies for promoting and reinforcing altruistic behavior in the early childhood environment.

 

"This course shows that empathy isn’t just about being nice or thoughtful. Empathy is a vital life skill and a major factor in personal relationships and communication," says Maria C. Taylor, President and CEO of CCEI. "Our empathy and prosocial behaviors training course shows early childhood professionals why this topic is as important for children as it is for adults.”

more...
No comment yet.