Empathy and Animals
18.6K views | +1 today
Follow
Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

COMPASSION IS ENRICHING | Wellness Blog on Speakingtree.in

COMPASSION  IS ENRICHING  | Wellness Blog on Speakingtree.in | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Recent  scientific research on happiness and brain function suggests that when we help others , ..we help ourselves ...by becoming happier .Hence  the best hope we have for attaining happiness ourselves is to pay more attention to the wellbeing of others. Compassion is enriching.
WHY DOES COMPASSION MAKE US HAPPY ?
We feel happy because  when our mind gets diverted in helping others , we realize that  others  also have problems in life ,we are not alone and  by  showing compassion we feel connected to them .OUR MIND GETS DIVERTED FROM OUR PROBLEMS 
Taking our focus away from what’s wrong in our lives helps us to be less self-obsessed. Compassion therefore diverts our attention away from   our  problems which occupy  our minds. When we worry less about ourselves, our own suffering seems less intense. Compassion  displaces  our negative emotions from the mind because we can only focus on one primary emotional state at a time.  By: Pushpa Chaturvedi 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Dogs May Elicit More Empathy Than Some People

Dogs May Elicit More Empathy Than Some People | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

 People may feel more empathy for dogs than for some of their fellow humans, a new study finds.

 

When it comes to victims of violence, people may be less disturbed by the suffering of human adults, who are considered capable of taking care of themselves, the study suggests. Meanwhile, children, puppies and full-grown dogs are perceived as dependent and vulnerable.

The study involved 240 men and women. Most of the participants were white college students between 18 and 25 years old.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

People not necessarily more disturbed by animal suffering than human

People not necessarily more disturbed by animal suffering than human | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
People have more empathy for puppies, full grown dogs and human children who are battered than they do for battered adult humans, U.S. researchers say.

 

People have more empathy for puppies, full grown dogs and human children who are battered than they do for battered adult humans, U.S. researchers say.

Study co-authors Jack Levin and Arnold Arluke, professors at Northeastern University, questioned 240 men and women, most of whom were white and ages 18-25, at a large northeastern university. Participants randomly received one of four fictional news articles about the beating of a 1-year-old child, an adult in his 30s, a puppy, or a 6-year-old dog.



 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Humans Feel Greater Empathy for Battered Dogs than for Battered Adults, Study Shows

Humans Feel Greater Empathy for Battered Dogs than for Battered Adults, Study Shows | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

People feel greater empathy for puppies and even full-grown dogs subjected to violence than they do for battered adults, a new study shows.

 

Presented at the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, the report examined the reactions of 240 men and women between the ages of 18 and 25, each of whom randomly received one of four fictional news articles. Each story was identical in every way with one exception -- the victim, which varied between an infant, an adult in his 30s, a puppy and a 6-year-old dog.  

By Tamarra Kemsley  natureworldnews.com

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

New Yawn Research Results Suggest Dogs Empathize with Humans

New Yawn Research Results Suggest Dogs Empathize with Humans | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

University of Tokyo researchers Teresa Romero and colleagues published new research today (August 7th, 2013) that may bring us a step closer to understanding the science behind yawns. Their study, Familiarity Bias and Physiological Responses in Contagious Yawning by Dogs Support Link to Empathy, can be read in full on the open access journal PLOS ONE. To very quickly summarize, their study results showed that pet dogs respond more often to the yawns of their owners than to those of strangers. Dogs also responded more often (by yawning back) to real yawns than to mimicked, or fake, yawns.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

People have more empathy for abused puppies and dogs than they do for abused adult humans: Study

People have more empathy for abused puppies and dogs than they do for abused adult humans: Study | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

People have more empathy for abused puppies and dogs than they do for abused adult humans, a new study suggests. The researchers also found that women generally tended to be more empathetic than men.

 

People have more empathy for abused puppies and dogs than they do for adult humans who have been abused, a new study suggests.

However, empathy for abused children was about the same as that for puppies and dogs, the study found.

 

Researchers surveyed 240 college students and asked them to read one of four versions of a fictional news article about a brutal beating. The wording in articles was the same, except for the identity of the victim, which was either: an infant, an adult in his 30s, a puppy or a 6-year old dog. Participants then rated their level of empathy for the victim.

 By Rachael Rettner, Senior writer

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

People Have More Sympathy for Dogs Than Humans

People Have More Sympathy for Dogs Than Humans | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The latest study involved 240 men and women, most of whom were white and between the ages of 18 and 25, at a large northeastern university. The participants randomly received one of four fictional news articles about the beating of a one-year-old child, an adult in his thirties, a puppy, or a 6-year-old dog. Researchers said the stories were identical except for the victim's identity.  Participants were asked to rate their feeling of empathy towards the victim after reading the story.

more...
Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 18, 2013 1:44 AM

"People feel more sympathy for battered dogs than they do for some humans, new research suggests.

Researchers found that people have more empathy for battered puppies and full-grown dogs than they do for human adults.  Researchers said the findings do not apply to children." 


Is this  the last selfish stage of  people?   Denying the fact that we are all interconnected ? 




Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Finding Morality in Animals - evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism,

Finding Morality in Animals - evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism, | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Two new books explore research on animals to better understand the roots of human morality and challenge human specialness.

 

In The Bonobo and the Atheist, renowned primatologist Frans de Waal argues that moral behavior in humans is not predicated on religion. Drawing from extensive research on animals—primarily bonobos and chimpanzees, our nearest primate relatives—as well as research on fossil records of early hominids, he shows how evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism, predate the advent religion by millennia and co-evolved in non-human primates as well as in humans....

 

Virginia Morell takes a slightly different, but related tack in her new book, Animal Wise: The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures. Morell, a science writer...

 

By Jill Suttie 

more...
Caroline Hopper's curator insight, November 13, 2013 5:29 PM

Americans today tend to believe that human beings are somehow superior in their capacity to experience emotions.  I've always believed that animals feel sensations of excitement, sadness, love and disappointment. In this article,  Jill Suttie Argues that animals do feel human emotions.  According to Suttie, "evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism predate the advent of religion by millenia."  I agree that animals have a sense of morality, because my own experience owning pets confirms it.  When my cats misbehave, they know it and behave differenty to show it. In short, humans are not the only beings that have an emotional life.    

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Dog Buries Puppy: Scientific Studies Validate Dog Empathy [VIDEO]

Dog Buries Puppy: Scientific Studies Validate Dog Empathy [VIDEO] | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
A video of stirring dog empathy recently went viral and is now making news rounds. The video posted on Youtube appears to be a footage shot from a mobile phone camera showing an adult dog burying a puppy in a ditch.

 

Bodies of scientific inquiry into dog empathy have been published in recent years, including conclusive studies that dogs actually feel their owners' unhappiness... 

 Sometimes, the documentary reports, what people perceive as empathy is actually just emotional contagion.

 

In the video, one dog showed actual empathy, as far as the experiment's grounds would allow: it actually attempted to comfort a crying person, though the person was a complete stranger.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy and Disgust Do Battle in the Brain: Scientific American

Empathy and Disgust Do Battle in the Brain: Scientific American | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

An injured rat helps us understand the struggle between empathy and disgust

 

Evolutionary theorists believe that many of our behaviors are adaptive in some way. "Empathy probably started out as a mechanism to improve maternal care," saysFrans de Waal, a primatologist at Emory University and author of The Age of Empathy. "Mammalian mothers who were attentive to their young’s needs were more likely to rear successful offspring."

 

These offspring were, in turn, more likely to reproduce, so being able to sense another’s feelings was beneficial because it helped mammals to pass on their genes—the ultimate prize in the game of life. Mammalian males also show empathy, de Waal says, because “the mechanism spread from mother-offspring to other relations, including friends."

 

By Arielle Duhaime-Ross

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science

Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Do dogs really care? Dr Jonica Newby conducts an experiment based on a test used to track empathy in humans to see if dogs truly have empathy

 

Dr Jonica Newby
What we're talking about here is empathy. Now, there are a lot of definitions of empathy, but I'm gonna throw you a technical one. So empathy is the naturally occurring subjective experience of similarity between the feelings expressed by self and others without losing sight of whose feelings belong to who. Translated, what that means is to have true empathy, you have to not only feel someone's pain, you have to know that the emotion belongs to them and not to yourself.

more...
Ellen Diane's comment, June 11, 2013 7:50 AM
of course
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Study: Trends in Neurosciences - Toward a cross-species understanding of empathy

Study: Trends in Neurosciences - Toward a cross-species understanding of empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Signs of empathy have been observed in many mammals, including laboratory rodents.

 

‘Primal empathy’ utilizes the seven basic emotional systems of the mammalian brain.

 

Affective neuroscience approaches can elucidate the underlying brain substrates.

 

Continued study of primal empathy in rodents will benefit mental health practices.

 

A neuro-evolutionary paradigm can illuminate how empathy is expressed in humans

 

Summary

Although signs of empathy have now been well documented in non-human primates, only during the past few years have systematic observations suggested that a primal form of empathy exists in rodents. Thus, the study of empathy in animals has started in earnest. Here we review recent studies indicating that rodents are able to share states of fear, and highlight how affective neuroscience approaches to the study of primary-process emotional systems can help to delineate how primal empathy is constituted in mammalian brains.

 

Cross-species evolutionary approaches to understanding the neural circuitry of emotional ‘contagion’ or ‘resonance’ between nearby animals, together with the underlying neurochemistries, may help to clarify the origins of human empathy.

 

Authors
Jaak Panksepp
Jules B. Panksepp

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How Dogs Taught Me About Empathy

How Dogs Taught Me About Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Professional dog trainer Annie Phenix writes about how lovings dogs helped her overcome a rough childhood.

 

There are a lot of animals in my life. My family includes four rescued dogs, one purebred German Shepherd, two quarter horse geldings, a host of familiar wildlife, and six donkeys. The donkeys are the most important because, for me, they serve as fat, hairy therapy machines. I’ve learned that most donkeys are curious about us and enjoy nothing more than to sit with a human friend in a pasture, receiving many indulgent pets. They love us even though we’ve dismissed them throughout the centuries as nothing more than beasts of burden. However, the burden they are most suited for is loosening up our emotional ones...

If an animal has helped you heal from an emotional wound, I would love to hear about your experiences. If you haven’t been healed by an animal yet, never fear: There is still time.

 

more...
Brenda Robinson's curator insight, October 9, 2013 7:22 AM

We need to teach children in schools when they are young that all animals deserve our love, respect and protection and how animals help us in so many ways and that we must treat others as we want to be treated. It appears many kids were never taught these lessons to live by.

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The virtual reality cow aiming to turn steak lovers into vegetarians

The virtual reality cow aiming to turn steak lovers into vegetarians | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Researchers at Stanford University have developed a virtual reality avatar that enables humans to empathise with cows destined for the slaughterhouse.

 

"We were really interested in the theory of empathy," said Joshua Bostick, a Stanford University researcher. "Could you identify with this cow avatar and how did it make you feel about the environment and maybe things that you could do to make a small little difference."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Battered dogs get more empathy than adult humans: Survey : Postnoon

Battered dogs get more empathy than adult humans: Survey : Postnoon | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

People have more empathy for battered puppies and full grown dogs than they do for adult humans, a US survey has found.

 

Jack Levin and Arnold Arluke, sociology professors at the Northeastern University, surveyed 240 men and women, most of them white and between the ages of 18 and 25, at a large northeastern university in the US.

Participants randomly received one of four fictional news articles about the beating of a one-year-old child, an adult in his 30s, a puppy, or a six-year-old dog, reports Xinhua.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Video: Humans show more empathy for battered dogs

Video: Humans show more empathy for battered dogs | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

According to a new study conducted by northeastern university, humans say they show more empathy for man’s best friend than they would for battered humans.

 

Participants were asked to read the article and rate their feelings of empathy toward the victim of the story.

 

In the end, battered dogs and battered children drew the same response.

“It seems like there was a bit more sympathy for the animals maybe because animals are a voiceless victim. They don’t have a voice to cry out for help on their own,” said Sybil Soukup.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Battered Puppies Prompt More Empathy in Humans Than Adults Who Experienced Physical Abuse

Battered Puppies Prompt More Empathy in Humans Than Adults Who Experienced Physical Abuse | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

A new study shows people may have more empathy for battered puppies than people, well adults anyway, according to a news release...

 

Researchers found age is the main factor that elicits more empathy. There was no real statistical difference between empathy for a child versus that of a puppy.

"We were surprised by the interaction of age and species," Levin said. "Age seems to trump species, when it comes to eliciting empathy. In addition, it appears that adult humans are viewed as capable of protecting themselves while full grown dogs are just seen as larger puppies."

 

By Zulai Serrano

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Humans Make Dogs Yawn

Humans Make Dogs Yawn | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Dogs yawn along with their owners, revealing a human-like ability to empathise, say scientists. Everyone knows yawns can be contagious, but a new study shows how the irresistible impulse to yawn can even spread between humans and their dogs.

 

According to researchers this could be an indication of empathy - the capacity to identify with another person's emotional state - in man's best friend.

The Japanese team of scientists recruited 25 dogs and their owners for the study. Dogs watched their owner, or someone they did not know, yawn or mimic yawning mouth movements. They were much more likely to yawn in response to their owner yawning than the actions of a stranger.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Americans Have More Empathy-Sympathy for Suffering Dogs Than Human Adults: Study

Americans Have More Empathy-Sympathy for Suffering Dogs Than Human Adults: Study | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Young Americans have more sympathy for suffering babies and dogs than they do for human adults, a new study suggests.

 

Northeastern University researchers showed 256 college undergraduates fictitious news reports of brutally beaten human adults, children and canines, and asked the respondents to indicate their level of empathy.

 

"We found significantly more empathy for victims who are human children, puppies and fully-grown dogs than for victims who are adult humans," the study said. "In other words, age makes a difference for empathy toward human victims, but not for dog victims."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Scientists discover pet dogs yawn when their owners do, as part of emotional connection

Scientists discover pet dogs yawn when their owners do, as part of emotional connection | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

IT'S true. Your dog yawns when you do and the process is contagious, just as it is in humans.

 

Scientists have found that pet dogs yawn significantly more in response to their owners than to strangers' yawns.

 

Dogs also respond less frequently to fake yawns, suggesting they have the ability to yawn contagiously just as humans do.

 

Previous research has shown that dogs yawn in response to human yawns but it was unclear whether this was a response to stress or empathy.

 

by BRIAN WILLIAMS

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Video: Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science

Video:  Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Do dogs really care? Dr Jonica Newby conducts an experiment based on a test used to track empathy in humans to see if dogs truly have empathy

 

Dr Jonica Newby
What we're talking about here is empathy. Now, there are a lot of definitions of empathy, but I'm gonna throw you a technical one. So empathy is the naturally occurring subjective experience of similarity between the feelings expressed by self and others without losing sight of whose feelings belong to who. Translated, what that means is to have true empathy, you have to not only feel someone's pain, you have to know that the emotion belongs to them and not to yourself.

more...
Mike Mohler's comment, June 28, 2013 11:05 PM
How sweet! :)
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Book Talk: Of apes and atheists – is empathy evolution?

Book Talk: Of apes and atheists – is empathy evolution? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
For biologist Frans de Waal, a peaceful species of great ape in Africa is a mirror of humanity and a living argument that empathy and cooperation are far from unique to mankind.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Your Dog May Be Smarter Than You Think - CBS Miami Video

Your Dog May Be Smarter Than You Think - CBS Miami Video | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Can a dog empathize with human emotion? According to researchers, they are one of the few species that can express empathy, and thanks to Dr. Brian Hare it’s possible to discover more of what’s hiding behind your dog’s puppy eyes.

 

Dr. Brian Hare, author of The Genius of Dogsand director of the Duke University Canine Cognition Center is the brains behind “Dognition,” a website which features a series of online tests that can help you gauge your pooch’s intelligence.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The Cosmopolitan Ape: What Makes You So Special - Empathy, morality, community, culture—apes can have it all!

The Cosmopolitan Ape: What Makes You So Special - Empathy, morality, community, culture—apes can have it all! | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The next time you mutter under your breath about the big gorilla in the next office, you might want to reconsider. The insult may reflect badly on you. Renowned primatologist Frans de Waal has spent decades studying chimpanzees and bonobos and found that nearly everything we hold in high esteem as “human nature” can be found in great apes.

 

De Waal runs Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta. He’s written a series of influential books, including Chimpanzee Politics and Our Inner Ape, which add up to a sustained argument against human exceptionalism. His new book, The Bonobo and the Atheist, takes aim at critics and dissenters—anthropologists, behaviorists, Christian fundamentalists—and at the “strident atheism” of Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. De Waal, a non-believer himself, sees religion as an offshoot of our biological drive to do good.

 

BY STEVE PAULSON

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science

Dog Empathy - ABC TV Science | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Do dogs really care? Dr Jonica Newby conducts an experiment based on a test used to track empathy in humans to see if dogs truly have empathy

 

Dr Jonica Newby
What we're talking about here is empathy. Now, there are a lot of definitions of empathy, but I'm gonna throw you a technical one. So empathy is the naturally occurring subjective experience of similarity between the feelings expressed by self and others without losing sight of whose feelings belong to who. Translated, what that means is to have true empathy, you have to not only feel someone's pain, you have to know that the emotion belongs to them and not to yourself.

more...
Ellen Diane's comment, June 11, 2013 7:50 AM
of course