Empathy and Animals
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Are dogs empathetic? Iraq vet knows they are

Are dogs empathetic? Iraq vet knows they are | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Are dogs empathetic? By definition, empathy is defined as the ability to share in another’s emotions, thoughts, or feelings.To do this, dogs must have theory of mind — the ability to take into account that other beings have thoughts, intentions, and emotions. Some believe these behaviors are attributable to “emotional contagion,” described by Dr. Stanley Cohen in Psychology Today (06/07/12) as “responding to the emotions of another without really understanding what that individual is feeling.” To others, there must be a more simplistic, less anthropomorphic explanation.

 

by Bob McMillan

 

img http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog

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Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy and Animals Magazine

Empathy and Animals Magazine | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Sponsored by Edwin Rutsch: Empathy Guide Services
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These one-to-one empathy sessions support; well-being, healing, practicing to be a better listener and supporting you in creating empathic environments in your relationships, family, school, work, communities and beyond.


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Book Review: Entangled Empathy, An alternative ethic for our relationships with Animals, by Lori Gruen

Book Review: Entangled Empathy, An alternative ethic for our relationships with Animals, by Lori Gruen | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Essentially, Entangled Empathy is a rallying cry to abandon ridged ethical principles when dealing with animals and move to a more empathic model.

 

To do this we have to recognize that we already have complex relationships with animals and when it comes to their welfare a one size fits all solution can actually be harmful.

There is a lot of merit to what Gruen is talking about in Entangled Empathy; however, the execution leaves a little be desired. There are some rally quite interesting models used to prove ethical points (such as the man and the children on the subway); however these are not expanded upon with any great new insights. Rather they are broken down to component parts and never put back together again.

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Rats feel empathy for other rats, unless they're on antidepressants

Rats feel empathy for other rats, unless they're on antidepressants | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

A 2011 study found that when a free rat came in contact with a rat trapped in a container, the free rat was empathically motivated to release the distressed rat from its cell. But a new study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, noted that a rat put in a similar scenario but given an anti-anxiety medication, was less likely to free its trapped peer.

Both studies were led in part by Peggy Mason, professor of neurobiology from the University of Chicago. In the most recent study, Mason discovered that rats given the antidepressant midazolam were less likely to free a fellow rat from a locked compartment, but would, however, open the same restrainer device when it contained chocolate instead. The drug dampened a test rat's emotional connection with a distressed peer, but did not limit its physical ability to open the container if it so chose to.

 

Basically, the free rat acted like an self-centered, cocoa-fueled jerkwad. 

 

By Chris Plante

 

 

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Do Dogs Feel Empathy? 

Do Dogs Feel Empathy?  | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
When one person yawns, its not uncommon for someone else to follow suit. The same goes for laughing or smiling. This involuntary mimicry of another person is known as “emotional contagion,” and is thought to be evidence for a basic form of empathy, as one person is able to experience what another is feeling.

 

Now, it seems, dogsmay do this too as they have been found to involuntarily mimic other dogs while playing. The researchers claim that this gives further proof that dogs are very likely empathetic.

We know that dogs can and do mimic their owners, as shown when canines catch their human’s yawn. But the new research, published in Royal Society Open Science, has found that dogs do the same with other dogs in what the scientists think is an attempt at bonding. 

 

 

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Oakland TLC Program Teaches At-Risk Kids Empathy Toward Animals

Oakland TLC Program Teaches At-Risk Kids Empathy Toward Animals | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Selected students spend the first four weeks of the program in a school classroom for two hours a day after school. There, they engage in positive-reinforcement lessons and exercises that help teach them empathy and compassion for living creatures.

 

During the final four weeks of the program, students are divided into pairs and teamed with a shelter dog, who they actually get to train.

“Creating that student-dog bond is absolutely vital,” says Kurup. “Many of the dogs have backgrounds that are similar to those of the students — some have been abused, others neglected or abandoned.”

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Peta: Teaching empathy for animals not only helps animals but also lessens the likelihood that kids will be cruel to other kids.

Peta: Teaching empathy for animals not only helps animals but also lessens the likelihood that kids will be cruel to other kids. | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Human beings create arbitrary barriers to exclude beings who aren’t like them. Human beings have justified their wars, slavery, sexual violence, and military conquests with the mistaken belief that those who are “different” do not experience suffering and are not worthy of moral consideration.

 

As an educator, you have a chance to teach your students that all animals—whether a rat, a pig, a dog, or a child—feel pain, happiness, and fear and want to live.

 

Teaching empathy and compassion for animals not only helps animals but also lessens the likelihood that kids will grow up to be cruel to other kids.

 

We know, for example, that many violent offenders, including many serial killers, started out harming animals before moving on to humans.

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ScienceTake Elephant Empathy Video NYTimes com

ScienceTake Elephant Empathy Video NYTimes com
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Pets help Mossy Creek students practice empathy

The school’s Student Protection Committee, comprised of faculty members, students and parents, wanted students to practice empathy by performing acts of kindness toward animals, according to a news release from the school district.

 

The school partnered with the Aiken SPCA-Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare to promote kindness to animals through spreading awareness about adoption, the importance of spaying and neutering pets and encouraging others to volunteer in places like animal shelters.

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Empathy is More Common in Animals Than Originally Thought

Empathy is More Common in Animals Than Originally Thought | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Researchers have been working on a brand new study based on prairie voles actually consoling their loved one who are feeling stressed, and based on the results of this study, it appears that the infamous “love hormone,” called oxytocin, is the underlying mechanism.

 

Up until now, we have only been able to document the consolation behavior in a few non-human species that typically have higher levels of cognition and sociality, such as dogs, dolphins, and elephants.

For this particular study, the prairie vole were used and were able to show researchers that they are particularly social rodents, which causes them to be the focus of multiple studies in this field.

 

This data led James Burkett, along with his colleagues, to vastly explore their potential for empathy-motivated behaviors

 

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Empathy is More Common in Animals Than Originally Thought

Empathy is More Common in Animals Than Originally Thought | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Researchers have been working on a brand new study based on prairie voles actually consoling their loved one who are feeling stressed, and based on the results of this study, it appears that the infamous “love hormone,” called oxytocin, is the underlying mechanism.

 

Up until now, we have only been able to document the consolation behavior in a few non-human species that typically have higher levels of cognition and sociality, such as dogs, dolphins, and elephants.

For this particular study, the prairie vole were used and were able to show researchers that they are particularly social rodents, which causes them to be the focus of multiple studies in this field.

 

This data led James Burkett, along with his colleagues, to vastly explore their potential for empathy-motivated behaviors

 

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US children are reading to shelter dogs: It's encouraging children to develop empathy with animals

US children are reading to shelter dogs: It's encouraging children to develop empathy with animals | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Ms Klepacki said the program has helped the children as much as the dogs.

“It's encouraging children to develop empathy with animals. It's a peaceful, quiet exercise. They're seeing fearfulness in these animals, and seeing the positive affect they can have,” she said.

“It encourages them to look at things from an animal’s perspective. That helps them better connect with animals and people in their lives.”

Ms Klepacki said the program has so far been very successful in helping to find forever homes for a large number of dogs.

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Do animals feel empathy? Inside the decades-long quest for an answer

Do animals feel empathy? Inside the decades-long quest for an answer | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Yes, even rats have feelings. Here’s how we know.


Throughout her career as a neurobiologist, Peggy Mason has been told over and over that the rats she experiments on are not capable of empathy. Only humans and other primates can understand the emotions of another. Most other animals can't. And certainly not beady-eyed rats....


The study, published in Science in 2011, was a breakthrough. If rats were capable of basic forms of empathy, then perhaps empathy was common — or even universal — among mammals. Studying animal empathy could give us insight into how human empathy evolved. ("I consider myself just a fancy rat," Mason told me.)


by Brian Resnick

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Susan Stillman's curator insight, February 9, 9:48 AM
Such an important topic, especially when we think of the lack of empathy that many humans have for animals.
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When hurt, rodents may console each other: neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses

When hurt, rodents may console each other:  neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Young said his research points to a potential role for oxytocin in the treatment of autism spectrum disorder, though more work is needed. “

We now have the opportunity to explore in detail the neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses in a laboratory rodent with clear implications for humans.”

According to study co-author Frans de Waal, who first discovered animal consolation behavior in chimpanzees in 1979, the findings also shed new light on the range of animals that feel empathy, and how empathy is separate from complex cognition.


Scientists have been reluctant to attribute empathy to animals, often assuming selfish motives,” he said.


 TODD AHERN / EMORY UNIVERSITY

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10 Amazing Displays Of Animal Empathy

10 Amazing Displays Of Animal Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Do animals have emotions? This is a bigger question than it might appear to be. When an animal feels and cares for someone beyond itself, it’s more than just a cute story to post on Facebook. It’s an insight into the nature of what they really are.

 

Beyond even that, it might just be a glimpse into a redeeming part of our animal side that shows a basic decency that is built into the biology of life.

 

There are proven records of animals showing empathy. Several, in fact. Sometimes, animals take care of each other. Sometimes, they show outpourings of grief, and sometimes, they even take care of us. However they show it, though, there are several times when animals have shown empathy—and some of them are in ways that are so much like humans that they will shock you.

 

Mark Oliver

 

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Anti-anxiety medication limits empathetic behavior in rats - The University of Chicago Medicine

Anti-anxiety medication limits empathetic behavior in rats - The University of Chicago Medicine | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Rats given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free trapped companions because the drug lessened their empathy, according to a new study by University of Chicago neuroscientists.

The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, validates studies that show rats are emotionally motivated to help other rats in distress. In the latest study, rats treated with midazolam did not open the door to a restrainer device containing a trapped rat, although control rats routinely freed their trapped companions. Midazolam did not interfere with the rats' physical ability to open the restrainer door, however. In fact, when the restrainer device contained chocolate instead of a trapped rat, the test rats routinely opened the door. The findings show that the act of helping others depends on emotional reactions, which are dampened by the anti-anxiety medication.
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Animal Heroes 2 | Animal Helps dan Saves Others Animal | Try To Watch This Without Crying

Very Emotional, The animal heroes. Animal helps and saves other animals. helps and saves each others, Try to watch this without crying. A Restoring faith i
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Ft. McMurray’s animals and the evolution of human empathy

Ft. McMurray’s animals and the evolution of human empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

 

The growing attachment to household animals may be selective in some cases – doggy birthday parties don’t advance the cause of animal rights appreciably – but anyone who develops a deep relationship with a pet is well-placed to extend that empathy to other creatures, including other humans.

 

 

It’s no coincidence that the animal-rights movement that has campaigned for better conditions in factory farms, slaughterhouses, zoos and marine parks has made breakthroughs at the same time the attachment to household animals has strengthened. We abhor the confinement of elephants, or the tedium suffered by a performing orca or the casual cruelties of a mismanaged abattoir, because we have figured out, unlike most of our distant ancestors, that these creatures are indeed suffering, that their suffering is real, and that we have the responsibility to stop it.

 

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Join the Empathy Trainers Association - Now Forming

Join the Empathy Trainers Association - Now Forming | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The Association For

  1. Empathy Trainers who have similar and common interests, activities and concerns about teaching empathy.
  2. Mutual promotion of the welfare of all it’s members.
  3. Protect and advance mutual interests.
  4. Set and maintain standards.
  5. Promote social, advertising and political action to get communities, organizations, businesses and government to support empathy training programs.
  6. etc


Benefits for Members

  • Access to training curriculum from other members.
  • Share training materials and resources.
  • A directory of empathy trainers that prospective clients can access. For Clients - If you're looking for a trainer you have a place to go 
  • Offer business support and leads to members. 
  • Discussion forums listservs.
  • etc

 

 
JOIN THESE DISCUSSION GROUPS
=================================
To get the discussion going sign up at

(  ) First Step, Join the
Google Group Email Discussions List
http://j.mp/1OeoT1O

(  ) Facebook Group
http://facebook.com/groups/1538564663111673/

(  ) Empathy Trainers Association Website
http://j.mp/1TmOzL8

(  ) Facebook Event
http://j.mp/1WJ7chE

 

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Animal smarts: A Q&A with primatologist Frans de Waal

Animal smarts: A Q&A with primatologist Frans de Waal | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
We do a lot of studies on empathy in animals, and we found that they are affected by the mood states and emotions of others. This is getting close to human morality, the basis of which is that we empathize and care about others.

 

Chimps are not into reasoning or justification like we are, but they have the core –what the philosopher David Hume called the moral sentiments. There’s an enormous amount of psychological continuity between humans and our close animal relatives: compassion, empathy, sympathy, reciprocity, cooperation, a sense of fairness and justice.

What’s a good example of moral behavior in animals?

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Therapy dogs help Nacogdoches ISD students learn lessons about empathy

Therapy dogs help Nacogdoches ISD students learn lessons about empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
"A lot of times people when they are reluctant to open up with another person, they'll open up when an animal is there,” Taravella said. “It makes them feel more relaxed, more calm and just more willing to share."

It happened today with special need students. K.J., like Hope, has a hearing challenge, but articulates well how animals can teach empathy to humans.

"They won't judge them. They won't lie to them,” said K.J. Huey, an 8th grader. “No matter what trauma they've been through, they'll eventually come around."

Morgan Faulkner, student-"If you give them the love they need, they will give you the love you want."

 

By Donna McCollum

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The Power of Animals to Teach Children Empathy

How a child interacts with the world is learned early on in their development, so how can we teach children to approach those around them from a standpoint of empathy instead of fear or hate?

Introducing the first digital interactive e-book app from the RedRover Readers program: Children will learn important life skills while being immersed in a wonderful story of courage, compassion and empathy. SIGN UP HERE to get the e-book app: http://redrover.org/e-book

 

 

Teaching empathy for amimals

  • Role playing - play being the animal
  • using dogs as service dogs to foster connection and warmth, via raising oxytocyn,

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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4 barriers to empathy in customer service

4 barriers to empathy in customer service | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
In the article “Not feeling it? Learn how to navigate the roadblocks to empathy” on our Relate site, we learn that there’s a lot that can disrupt our brain’s ability to empathize. But it’s also true that as long as we believe we can be more empathic, we can be. Studies show that our capacity for empathy is not fixed.

Here are a few things that make empathy in customer service difficult, but that agents can learn to watch—and correct—for.

 

1. Feeling the pressure..

2. Making snap decisions..

3. “Stranger danger”...

4. Distractions in the workplace..

 

Following that, here are a few creative ways to help strengthen that empathy muscle.

  • Enroll in a formal empathy training, like those offered by Seek Company
  • Get involved with your local community and promote a culture of volunteerism in the workplace
  • Attempt a challenging physical activity (Tough Mudder, anyone?)
  • Make time for meditation. Who knows, you might even set up a weekly hour for quiet meditation over the lunch hour.
  • Try reading fiction for pleasure—book a room, invite friends, but adhere to a strict no-talking policy

 

BY SUZANNE BARNECUT

 

 

 

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The Power of Animals to Teach Children Empathy

How a child interacts with the world is learned early on in their development, so how can we teach children to approach those around them from a standpoint of empathy instead of fear or hate?

Introducing the first digital interactive e-book app from the RedRover Readers program: Children will learn important life skills while being immersed in a wonderful story of courage, compassion and empathy. SIGN UP HERE to get the e-book app: http://redrover.org/e-book

 

 

Teaching empathy for amimals

  • Role playing - play being the animal
  • using dogs as service dogs to foster connection and warmth, via raising oxytocyn,

 

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Do animals feel empathy? Inside the decades-long quest for an answer

Do animals feel empathy? Inside the decades-long quest for an answer | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Yes, even rats have feelings. Here’s how we know.


Throughout her career as a neurobiologist, Peggy Mason has been told over and over that the rats she experiments on are not capable of empathy. Only humans and other primates can understand the emotions of another. Most other animals can't. And certainly not beady-eyed rats....


The study, published in Science in 2011, was a breakthrough. If rats were capable of basic forms of empathy, then perhaps empathy was common — or even universal — among mammals. Studying animal empathy could give us insight into how human empathy evolved. ("I consider myself just a fancy rat," Mason told me.)


by Brian Resnick

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Susan Stillman's curator insight, February 9, 9:48 AM
Such an important topic, especially when we think of the lack of empathy that many humans have for animals.
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PETA Hopes to Turn 'Silence of the Lambs' House into 'Empathy Museum' - Breitbart

PETA Hopes to Turn 'Silence of the Lambs' House into 'Empathy Museum' - Breitbart | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is hoping to turn the infamous torture house used by Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs into an “empathy museum” where visitors can wear the skins of dead and abused animals.
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Do animals have empathy?

Empathy is the ability to understand and share feelings. Only a handful of species have this trait, including humans. A recent scientific study might have uncovered evidence that tells us why we feel this emotion — and it’s all thanks to a rodent.
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