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Sign of empathy: Bonobos comfort friends in distress

Sign of empathy: Bonobos comfort friends in distress | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Bonobos display consolation behavior, a sign of sensitivity to the emotions of others and the ability to take the perspective of another.

 

Comforting a friend or relative in distress may be a more hard-wired behavior than previously thought, according to a new study of bonobos, which are great apes known for their empathy and close relation to humans and chimpanzees. This provides key evolutionary insight into how critical social skills may develop in humans. The results were published by the journal PLOS One.

 

Researchers from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, observed juvenile bonobos at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo engaging in consolation behavior more than their adult counterparts. Juvenile bonobos (3 to 7 years old) are equivalent in age to preschool or elementary school-aged children.

 

By Lisa Newbern

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Gail Rogers's curator insight, February 10, 2013 9:08 AM

Bonobos are not robotic - but then, they don´t use social media!

Giuliano Cipollari's curator insight, February 16, 2013 5:00 AM

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Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
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Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

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DNews Video: Animal Empathy: Gorilla Cries Over Robin Williams

DNews Video: Animal Empathy: Gorilla Cries Over Robin Williams | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Are animals empathetic? World famous Koko the Gorilla, said to have mourned the death of comedic legend Robin Williams, reignites the debate over just how much empathy animals can muster, even across species

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Bonobo Monkeys Feel Empathy Too

Bonobo Monkeys Feel Empathy Too | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Results of a new study indicate that bonobo monkeys have very similar empathetic capabilities to humans.


Though empathy is something generally shared among humans, it is still up for debate whether or not other animals share this trait, and to what extent. Results of a new study indicate that bonobo monkeys have very similar empathetic capabilities to humans.


Although, unlike bonobos, we have a higher level of empathy towards individuals with whom we are close, such as family and friends.


The findings were published in the journal PeerJ.




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Human and Ape Empathy One and the Same

Human and Ape Empathy One and the Same | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy is universal across different species, new research suggests. After comparing the "yawn contagion" effect between humans and bonobos, researchers found that having a relationship carries significantly greater weight in stirring empathy than belonging to the same species.


"Emotional contagion" is the most basic form
of empathy, the ability to experience feelings
of another individual.


"Emotional contagion" happens when feelings disclosed by facial expressions (for example sorrow, pain, happiness or tiredness) are passed from an "emitting face" to a "receiving face". Mirroring the sender's facial expression will trigger similar emotion in the recipient.


 The findings are published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ.

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Are Apes as Empathetic as Humans? | The Scientist Magazine®

Are Apes as Empathetic as Humans? | The Scientist Magazine® | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
In the absence of complex emotional bonds, humans and bonobos show similar empathy, according to a study.


Contagious yawning has long been linked to empathy: humans and apes yawn more in response to the yawns of their kin and friends.


Now, scientists studying yawn contagion have shown that humans may not always be the most empathetic species. Their results, published today (August 12) in PeerJ, show that humans yawn more than bonobos only when close family and friends trigger the yawns. In the presence of mere acquaintances, however, humans and bonobos showed similar yawn sensitivity.


“It seems that the basal level of empathetic capacity is the same in the two species,” 


By Shreya Dasgupta 

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Is empathy in humans and apes actually different? | (e) Science News

Is empathy in humans and apes actually different? | (e) Science News | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Whether or not humans are the only empathic beings is still under debate. In a new study, researchers directly compared the 'yawn contagion' effect between humans and bonobos (our closest evolutionary cousins).....



In conclusion, this study suggests that differences in levels of emotional contagion between humans and bonobos are attributable to the quality of relationships shared by individuals.


When the complexity of social bonds, typical of humans, is not in play, 


Homo sapiens climb down the tree of empathy to go back to the understory which we share with our ape cousins.

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PUBLIC RELEASE: Is empathy in humans and apes actually different?

PUBLIC RELEASE: Is empathy in humans and apes actually different? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Whether or not humans are the only empathic beings is still under debate. In a new study, researchers directly compared the 'yawn contagion' effect between humans and bonobos -- our closest evolutionary cousins.


By doing so they were able to directly compare the empathic abilities of ourselves with another species, and found that a close relationship between individuals is more important to their empathic response than the fact that individuals might be from the same species....


In conclusion, this study suggests that differences in levels of emotional contagion between humans and bonobos are attributable to the quality of relationships shared by individuals. When the complexity of social bonds, typical of humans, is not in play, Homo sapiens climb down the tree of empathy to go back to the understory which we share with our ape cousins.

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Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy

Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Watch the video Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy on Yahoo News .


Experiments are underway at Stanford University to determine if immersive technology can result in more empathy for the environment. As AP's Haven Daley explains, the research uses the latest in virtual reality equipment. (Aug. 14)

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The amazing emotional intelligence of our primate cousins

The amazing emotional intelligence of our primate cousins | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

by Danielle Radin

Gorillas cooperating to dismantle poachers's snares, altruistic, food sharing chimpanzees, grieving lemurs performing death rituals ... Danielle Radin finds an extraordinary emotional depth and capacity for empathy in our fellow primates.


These new findings suggest a level of empathy and social welfare amongst primates never before studied.

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Raven Empathy « Life « Science Today

Raven Empathy « Life  « Science Today | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
New research shows that ravens may feel empathy.


Empathy, like many other traits, was long thought to be a human-specific feature. But recent research has revealed that animals from chimpanzees to dogs to rats can feel empathy.


Frans de Waal, PhD, one of the leading researchers in animal behavior and the author ofThe Age of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society, has said, "The possibility that empathy resides in parts of the brain so ancient that we share them with rats should give pause to anyone comparing politicians with those poor, underestimated creatures."


Last week, two Austrian researchers found evidence of empathetic behavior in another creature, ravens.

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Through the Wormhole: Elephants in the Mirror: Theory of Mind: YouTube

ELEPHANTS POSSESS A THEORY OF MIND

Dolphins, too:


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You need 12 hugs every day (creates empathy and understanding)

You need 12 hugs every day (creates empathy and understanding) | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

"The skin is the largest sensory organ in the body.  Physical touch, in particular hugs, are extremely beneficial physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually for both parties involved.


 Hugging builds trust and secures a sense of safety.  It builds self-esteem, relaxes muscles and releases tension.  It boosts oxytocin and serotonin levels.  It strengthens the immune system and balances the nervous system.  


Energetically it teaches us to give and receive, showing us how love flows both ways, and the synergistic flow of energy back and forth between two people creates empathy and understanding."


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the synergistic flow of energy back and

 forth between two people creates

empathy and understanding."

===========

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Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy

Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Watch the video Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy on Yahoo News . Experiments are underway at Stanford University to determine if immersive technology can result in more empathy for the environment. As AP's Haven Daley explains, the research uses the latest in virtual reality equipment. (Aug. 14)
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Do all animals have empathy? | Discover Wildlife

Do all animals have empathy? | Discover Wildlife | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

But animals that are not so conspicuously brainy, from chickens to ants, show distinct physiological responses when members of their own species are in distress.


This might be hard to ascribe to anything other than hard-wired, instinctive behaviour. If that is indeed the case, then it could be that what we describe as empathy, even in humans, is simply the kind of behaviour that one expects natural selection to favour in social animals.

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Psychologist: Animal abusers often lack empathy

Psychologist: Animal abusers often lack empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Clinical Psychologist and Mercer University Professor, Miranda Pratt , who has pets of her own, said animal abusers could be abused themselves or lack empathy.



Towards the other. And in some cases it's an active sadism of getting pleasure from inflicting pain," said Pratt.


She said it's important to teach empathy
at a young age.


If a child killed or tortured an animal, whether it's a frog or dog, Pratt said help teach them it's wrong. One way could be exposing them to nature and showing them the value of life
 

Elise Brown,
 

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The Kindness Of Strangers: Bonobos Are Just As Capable Of Empathy As We Are

The Kindness Of Strangers: Bonobos Are Just As Capable Of Empathy As We Are | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy, according to Merriam-Webster, is "the feeling that you understand and share another person's experiences and emotions."


Though empathy is something which is (generally) shared among humans, there has been some contention over whether or not other animals share this trait, and to what extent.  


Recently, a study published in PeerJ explored
the empathy similarities between humans
and Bonobo monkeys.


Since cognitive empathy is far from quantitative, the researchers studied the most simplistic form of an emotional contagion: the yawn. 


By Lindsey Robertson


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Apes and Humans Share Same Empathy, Yawn Study Suggests

Apes and Humans Share Same Empathy, Yawn Study Suggests | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy is universal across different species, new research suggests. After comparing the "yawn contagion" effect between humans and bonobos, researchers found that having a relationship carries significantly greater weight in stirring empathy than belonging to the same species...


"Emotional contagion" is the most basic form of empathy, the ability to experience feelings of another individual.


"Emotional contagion" happens when feelings disclosed by facial expressions (for example sorrow, pain, happiness or tiredness) are passed from an "emitting face" to a "receiving face". Mirroring the sender's facial expression will trigger similar emotion in the recipient.


CHRISTINE HSUCHRISTINE HSU

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Study finds empathy depends on relationships not species

Study finds empathy depends on relationships not species | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

New research indicates that humans may not be the only species that expresses empathy.


Elisabetta Palagi with the Natural History Museum at the University of Pisa in Italy and colleagues are the first to demonstrate both differences and similarities in a common empathetic response in both humans and bonobos.


The research was presented in the Aug. 12, 2014, edition of the journal PeerJ.


Paul Hamaker


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Contagious yawns are a sign of empathy

Contagious yawns are a sign of empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Scientists from universities in Pisa, Parma and Rome found that the 'catching yawn' is caused by a need to share and understand the emotions and feelings of others.


  • Scientists from universities in Pisa, Parma and Rome found that the 'catching yawn' is caused by a need to understand the feelings of others
  • The 'emotional bridge’ created by yawning enhances social bonding
  • Study found a yawn is far more likely to spread among groups of friends
  • Human ability to feel empathy is far stronger between friends and relatives 
  • Yawns are also contagious in groups of apes, but don't signify friendship


By BEN SPENCER

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SPCA teaches animal empathy at summer camp in Victoria

SPCA teaches animal empathy at summer camp in Victoria | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

While the BCSPCA is well known for teaching animal care and safety at its youth camps, it’s hoping children will walk away with another important skill this summer — empathy.


The group’s Among Animals summer camp program, created last year, runs for a week and is open to ages six and seven.


“That’s the age when we really have to start teaching them about empathy,”


said Breeanna McDonald, camp co-ordinator. “They’re interested in animals, a lot of them have pets at home, but they haven’t started thinking about the animals’ point of view.”


by  Drew McLachlan -

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Susan Stillman's curator insight, August 10, 5:40 AM

It's a great idea that I hope is repeated everywhere!  Kindness to animals, and teaching kids to not abuse them is beyond critical. Animal abuse is heartbreaking. Teaching kids empathy saves lives. And,  as this story implies, it not only about empathy to animals but about learning to practice empathy in many different contexts.

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Dogs feel empathy for humans, study suggests

Dogs feel empathy for humans, study suggests | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

A recent study by UK researchers from Goldsmiths College in London suggests that dogs may be capable of empathy.


They set out to collect 18 untrained pet dogs and place a stranger and the dogs owner in different places. The owner and stranger would alternately express themselves vocally in various ways. 15 of the 18 dogs sought out the person making distressed sounds, even if it was the stranger(Garrett).


=====================
this demonstrates that dogs are capable of exhibiting consolatory behavior, and thus, a degree of empathy in trying to comfort the sad person.
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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, July 8, 8:56 AM

Dog owners have known this for a long time, but scientists are more careful naming things. 

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A man of compassion: Interview with Professor Marc Bekoff

A man of compassion: Interview with Professor Marc Bekoff | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Expanding our compassion footprint to other animals as well as people is good for everyone, according to eminent ecologist and evolutionary biologist Professor Marc Bekoff.


The author of 25 books on animal behaviour and emotions spoke with Katrina Fox via Skype on the eve of his trip to Australia to speak on a panel organised by the University of Technology Sydney’s Centre for Compassionate Conservation.\


 Cull & Contain
or Compassion?
 


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Dogs in classroom helping students learn empathy

Dogs in classroom helping students learn empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The concept is pretty simple: bring kind rescue dogs into classrooms to help kids learn empathy and pique their interest in difficult subject matter. But the effects are profound.


“Our 5th grade children, I would say their demeanor has changed as a direct result of the compassion they have learned to show to an animal they know was a rescue animal,” Royall Elementary School principal Julie Smith said.


“Even for my toughest kids, the most street savvy, it almost physically transforms them into a child with empathy. "

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DOLPHINS REACTING TO MIRROR UNDERWATER - self awareness - YouTube

Good report by cnn--the report couldnt be saved to favorites and would have aged off the system. Mutual of omahas Wild Kingdom started the change of animal a...
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Chimpanzees empathise with human strangers

Chimpanzees empathise with human strangers | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Whether animals have the ability to show empathy similar to humans has been the subject for debate for many years. Matthew Campbell and Frans de Waal, who work at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, set about to test this under controlled conditions.


Research undertaken by the two found that chimpanzees can empathise with humans, even if the human is unfamiliar to them. The team explain, “Chimpanzees showed that the ability to connect with unfamiliar individuals is not unique to humans.” However, the chimpanzees did not empathise with baboons, a species that was unknown to the chimps in the experiment.


===========================

Contagious yawning was key in the study,
as with this mimicked action the team were
able to measure how empathetic the
chimps were – the more yawns,
the greater the level of empathy.

============

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Chloe Cudaback's curator insight, April 9, 11:00 PM

This is incredible evidence of the undeniable biological bond that chimpanzees have to humans. I find that too often chimpanzees get grouped with monkeys and baboons, gorillas and other apes. But rarely, would a human truly group chimpanzees with humans. This is amazing research that shows chimpanzees sense more of an attachment with humans than with baboons. 

Yawning was a huge part of this experiment. When humans yawn because they see another human yawn, it is because they empathize with the other human's tiredness. If chimpanzees are mimicking the yawning as well, this could be evidence that a chimpanzee understands human actions and can draw from their own mind to act on these actions. 

 

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Study: Chimpanzees empathize with group mates and humans, but not with baboons or unfamiliar chimpanzees

Study: Chimpanzees empathize with group mates and humans, but not with baboons or unfamiliar chimpanzees | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Abstract: Human empathy can extend to strangers and even other species, but it is unknown whether non-humans are similarly broad in their empathic responses.


===================

We explored the breadth and

flexibility of empathy in chimpanzees,

a close relative of humans.

==========


We used contagious yawning to measure involuntary empathy and showed chimpanzees videos of familiar humans, unfamiliar humans and gelada baboons (an unfamiliar species). We tested whether each class of stimuli elicited contagion by comparing the effect of yawn and control videos. After including previous data on the response to ingroup and outgroup chimpanzees, we found that familiar and unfamiliar humans elicited contagion equal to that of ingroup chimpanzees.


Gelada baboons did not elicit contagion, and the response to them was equal to that of outgroup chimpanzees. However, the chimpanzees watched the outgroup chimpanzee videos more than any other. The combination of high interest and low contagion may stem from hostility towards unfamiliar chimpanzees, which may interfere with an empathic response.


Overall, chimpanzees showed flexibility in that they formed an empathic connection with a different species, including unknown members of that species. These results imply that human empathic flexibility is shared with related species.


by

Matthew W. Campbell
Frans B. M. de Waal


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