Empathy and Animals
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Rat and ant rescues 'don't show empathy'

Rat and ant rescues 'don't show empathy' | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

(Phys.org) -- Studies of how rats and ants rescue other members of their species do not prove that animals other than humans have empathy, according to a team led by Oxford University scientists.

 

'Empathy has been proposed as the motivation behind the sort of ‘pro-social' rescue behaviour in which one individual tries to free another,' said Professor Alex Kacelnik of Oxford University's Department of Zoology, lead author of the article, 'however, the reproductive benefits of this kind of behaviour are relatively well understood as, in nature, they are helping individuals to which they are likely to be genetically related or whose survival is otherwise beneficial to the actor. 'To prove empathy any experiment must show an individual understands another's feelings and is driven by the psychological goal of improving another's wellbeing. Our view is that, so far, there is no proof of this outside of humans.'

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Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
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Empathy and Animals Magazine

Empathy and Animals Magazine | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

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grouchcustom's comment, April 4, 3:13 AM
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(Empathy and Animals) Want to raise empathetic kids? Get them a dog.

(Empathy and Animals) Want to raise empathetic kids? Get them a dog. | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Here are five ways in which pets can help children develop their EQ. 

 

  1. By developing empathy
  2. By teaching responsibility and boosting self-esteem
  3. By reducing stress
  4. By helping a child learn to read
  5. By helping children express their emotions

 

 

Overview

Summary:   benefits of having a pet,

Definition:
Benefits

  • develop awareness of animals feelings - needs
  • learn to read non verbal feelings 

Training:

Just owning a pet teaches empathy.
Author: 

Denise Daniels is a child development and parenting expert specializing in the social and emotional development of children.

References: 

  • Robert Poresky of Kansas State University, has shown a correlation between attachment to a pet and higher empathy scores.

 

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Chimps & Humans Console Victims in Surprisingly Similar Ways

Chimps & Humans Console Victims in Surprisingly Similar Ways | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Yesterday there was a horrific car accident just steps from my home. Upon hearing the sound of the crash, several neighbours ran to the street to make sure everyone was okay. As several ambulance arrived, and we caught a glimpse of the situation, many of us began to gasp. Looking over at my friend, I saw she was crying.

 

Though my friend did not know the victims, she was clearly affected. My reaction was to hug her, and keep hugging her as we both felt this innate worry and sadness for the victims of the crash.

 

This instance — of consoling, and of empathy — would later remind me of a recent study Marie Lindegaard, a scientist at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement, led.

 

 

 ALEXA ERICKSON

JUNE 14, 2017

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Study finds people console victims of violence the same way as chimps

Study finds people console victims of violence the same way as chimps | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
  • Researchers looked at surveillance footage of 22 commercial robberies 
  • They examined what factors affected whether people offered support to victims
  • Social closeness was found to be more important than physical proximity 
  • And the behaviour demonstrated was found to be similar to that of chimps

 

Offering hugs and friendly touches to soothe victims of violence seems to be a primal instinct inherited from our primate ancestors.

That's the finding of a new study that has documented this behaviour scientifically in human adults for the first time.

The research has found that chimps and humans console victims of violence in remarkably similar ways. And the cause in both cases is a sense of empathy that is shared by people and great apes, according to the researchers.

 

By TIM COLLINS FOR MAILONLINE

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Study: Consolation in the aftermath of robberies resembles post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees

Study: Consolation in the aftermath of robberies resembles post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Post-aggression consolation is assumed to occur in humans as well as in chimpanzees. While consolation following peer aggression has been observed in children, systematic evidence of consolation in human adults is rare. We used surveillance camera footage of the immediate aftermath of nonfatal robberies to observe the behaviors and characteristics of victims and bystanders.

 

Consistent with empathy explanations, we found that consolation was linked to social closeness rather than physical closeness. While females were more likely to console than males, males and females were equally likely to be consoled.

 

Furthermore, we show that high levels of threat during the robbery increased the likelihood of receiving consolation afterwards. These patterns resemble post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees and suggest that emotions of empathic concern are involved in consolation across humans and chimpanzees.

 

 Marie Rosenkrantz Lindegaard, Lasse Suonperä Liebst, Wim Bernasco, Marie Bruvik Heinskou, Richard Philpot, Mark Levine, Peter Verbeek.

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The Leakey Foundation: Episode 18: Empathy

Empathy has long been considered a uniquely human trait, but it's an ability that has also been observed in apes and other animals. Primatologist Frans de Waal says that examples of empathy in non-human primates and other mammals suggest that empathy has a long evolutionary history in humans.

Frans de Waal is the C.H. Candler Professor of Psychology at Emory University where he directs the Living Links Center for the Advanced Study of Ape and Human Evolution. He’s the author of several books including The Age of Empathy, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

 

 

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livetdimwitted's comment, May 6, 1:01 AM
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ScienceTake | Elephant Empathy

ScienceTake | Elephant Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
See how monkeys teach manners, elephants show empathy and ants imitate water in ScienceTake, combining cutting-edge research from the world of science with stunning footage of the natural world in action.
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grouchcustom's comment, April 4, 3:12 AM
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Study: The human empathy connection to dogs and their facial expressions  

Study: The human empathy connection to dogs and their facial expressions   | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Highly empathetic people experience the facial expression of dogs more intensely than their less empathetic peers. Researchers with the University of Helsinki and Aalto University found human empathy isn't limited to the human species. The ability to share and understand another's feelings is an expansive trait.

"Empathy affected assessments of dogs' facial expressions even more than previous experience of dogs, probably because the face is a biologically important stimulus for humans," Miiamaaria Kujala, a postdoctoral researcher at Helsinki, said in a news release. "Our earlier studies have showed, however, that when considering the entire body language of dogs, previous experience of dogs increases in importance."''Brooks Hays

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Cute
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Empathetic people experience dogs’ expressions more strongly | University of Helsinki

Empathetic people experience dogs’ expressions more strongly | University of Helsinki | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
A study by the University of Helsinki and Aalto University explored how empathy and other psychological factors affect people’s assessments of the facial images of dogs and humans.

The results show for the first time that human empathy, or the ability to share someone else’s feelings or experiences, also affects perceptions of the facial expressions of pet dogs.

“Empathy affected assessments of dogs’ facial expressions even more than previous experience of dogs, probably because the face is a biologically important stimulus for humans. Our earlier studies have showed, however, that when considering the entire body language of dogs, previous experience of dogs increases in importance,” explains postdoctoral researcher Miiamaaria Kujala.
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Study: Human empathy extends to dogs and their facial expressions

Study: Human empathy extends to dogs and their facial expressions | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Highly empathetic people experience the facial expression of dogs more intensely than their less empathetic peers.

Researchers with the University of Helsinki and Aalto University found human empathy isn't limited to the human species. The ability to share and understand another's feelings is an expansive trait.

"Empathy affected assessments of dogs' facial expressions even more than previous experience of dogs, probably because the face is a biologically important stimulus for humans," Miiamaaria Kujala, a postdoctoral researcher at Helsinki, said in a news release. "Our earlier studies have showed, however, that when considering the entire body language of dogs, previous experience of dogs increases in importance."

 

By Brooks Hays  

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Study: Do Ravens Show Consolation? Responses to Distressed Others

Study: Do Ravens Show Consolation? Responses to Distressed Others | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Background
Bystander affiliation (post-conflict affiliation from an uninvolved bystander to the conflict victim) may represent an expression of empathy in which the bystander consoles the victim to alleviate the victim's distress (“consolation”).

 

However, alternative hypotheses for the function of bystander affiliation also exist. Determining whether ravens spontaneously offer consolation to distressed partners may not only help us to understand how animals deal with the costs of aggressive conflict, but may also play an important role in the empathy debate.

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Study Examines Empathy in the Veterinary Profession

Study Examines Empathy in the Veterinary Profession | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Is your vet empathetic toward your horse? Is she empathetic toward you? Empathy is the ability to share someone else’s feelings or understand what they’re going through from their perspective.

 

It can be a helpful trait for doctors so that they see their patients as fellow humans with complex emotional lives rather than just a list of conditions and symptoms to be treated.

Although their patients aren’t human, veterinarians can have empathy for the animals they treat, too. But a veterinary practice is about more than just treating animals; the owners of the animals being treated are part of the equation, and their concerns and perspective must be considered, too.

 

Leslie Potter 

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Do Horses Feel Empathy?

Do Horses Feel Empathy? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Like primates, horses share many of the social and ethological characteristics believed to favor an ability to experience empathy.

 

Have you ever seen a horse quietly follow a calm buddy into the trailer but then become anxious when loaded alone? Or maybe you’ve been on a trail ride when one horse suddenly startles and spins, causing the others to startle as well.

 

These are examples of social buffering and emotional contagion—when one individual is affected by or shares the emotions of another—and provide evidence that horses possess the capacity for empathy.

 

 

By Robin Foster,

 

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(Empathy and Animals) Why Having A Pet Teaches Your Child Empathy

(Empathy and Animals) Why Having A Pet Teaches Your Child Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Here are three ways that pets help with emotional development in children:

  1. Teaches responsibility...
  2.  Helps cultivate empathy.
    Kids are inherently focused on their own needs, so having to take to care for a pet will teach them to focus on the needs of others...
  1. Develops compassion...
  2. + Increases emotional intelligence 
  3. + Think of others instead of just self.


Overview


Summary:  Some of the benefits of children having pets.

Benefits:

  * focus on the feelings of others...

  * Learn to read no verbal feelings


Training:
* Just having a pet trains kids in empathy skills


Author: Waldo 

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University of Parma: rats too are capable of empathy

University of Parma: rats too are capable of empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Cohabitation between a male rat and a familiar rat of the same age submitted to social stress activates a behaviour similar to empathy.

This is the result of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Parma, published in the prestigious international journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.

 

The study showed that an animal experiencing acute stress after having been defeated by an aggressive rat, induces a high degree of emotional contagion in its cagemate that exhibits a higher heart rate, high levels of circulating corticosterone and social anxiety. 

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Study finds people console victims of violence the same way as chimps:  cause in both cases is a sense of empathy .

Study finds people console victims of violence the same way as chimps:  cause in both cases is a sense of empathy . | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
  • Researchers looked at surveillance footage of 22 commercial robberies 
  • They examined what factors affected whether people offered support to victims
  • Social closeness was found to be more important than physical proximity 
  • And the behaviour demonstrated was found to be similar to that of chimps

 

Offering hugs and friendly touches to soothe victims of violence seems to be a primal instinct inherited from our primate ancestors.

That's the finding of a new study that has documented this behaviour scientifically in human adults for the first time.

The research has found that chimps and humans console victims of violence in remarkably similar ways. And the cause in both cases is a sense of empathy that is shared by people and great apes, according to the researchers.

 

By TIM COLLINS FOR MAILONLINE

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Like chimpanzees, humans may console victims of aggression out of empathy: 

Like chimpanzees, humans may console victims of aggression out of empathy:  | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Like chimpanzees, humans may console their threatened peers out of empathy, according to a study published May 31, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marie Rosenkrantz Lindegaard from the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR), The Netherlands, and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

Consolation is generally defined as an uninvolved bystander initiating friendly contact with a victim of aggression. Previous research has suggested that children and chimpanzees console their peers, but there is little research on consolation in human adults.
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Dogs Understand Fairness, Empathy, and Inequality

Dogs Understand Fairness, Empathy, and Inequality | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
His findings support research that shows that dogs understand concepts of empathy and inequality. As dog guardians can attest, dogs will lick or nuzzle humans or other animals who are crying or hurting, demonstrating an ability to read and understand emotions, even in different species, to empathize, and to try to help.

Show dogs that you, too, understand fairness, inequality, and empathy. Give them plenty of playtime, exercise, socialization, and affection, and adopt—don’t shop.
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shira's curator insight, April 30, 8:12 AM
כלבי מבינים רגשות ובעזרת תנועות הגוף שלהם הם מפגינים רגשות גם כן הם יכולים להיות תוקפנים כצריך וההם יכולים להיות מלאי חמלה ורגישות כלפי הסביבה שלהם. 
孫鈺婷's curator insight, May 3, 4:13 AM
喜歡主題的文章:寵物
livetdimwitted's comment, May 6, 1:01 AM
Cute
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Study Finds Dogs Can Actually Read Human Emotions & Show Empathy

Study Finds Dogs Can Actually Read Human Emotions & Show Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

We’ve all heard it before: Dogs are man’s best friend. They are extremely loyal, loving, and sensitive, always seeming to know when you need some cheering up. Well, a new study shows that they do in fact know when you are feeling down, or happy, or any other emotion, because they have the ability to read human emotion. They do this through interpreting various stimuli, such as visual and auditory cues, and they are the only creatures aside from humans that have been shown to have this ability...

 

It was found that dogs are also able to imitate each other’s expressions, which shows that they have the capacity for empathy as well

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shira's curator insight, April 8, 7:02 AM
מאמר על מחקר שנעשה באוניברסיטאות על הרגשות אמפטיה וההזדהות שכלבים חווים בני אדם וכיצד זה יתכן ?! 
vasteynort's comment, May 19, 12:34 AM
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What You Can Do to Prevent Compassion Fatigue

What You Can Do to Prevent Compassion Fatigue | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

If you have a pet you need to know this. Veterinary professionals are feeling the heat – and paying a price. Forever veterinarians have had empathy for your pets, for wildlife, zoo and farm animals. Maybe now it’s time for you to understand the flip side.

I don’t pretend to be an expert on depression and suicide, but, as for veterinarians, it stands to reason that the enormous debt load of students coming out of school (and I mean monumental) may play a role, and it’s a good guess that the personality type of the average veterinary professional may be also a factor.

“As a profession, we are passionate; we are selfless; we try really hard and don’t accept defeat easily,” says Chicago veterinarian Dr. Natalie Marks. “We don’t leave the job at the office, it comes home with us. We take what we do to heart. Those are really excellent qualities. But that also leaves us emotionally vulnerable.”

 

 By: Steve Dale

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Empathetic People Make the Best Dog Whisperers

Empathetic People Make the Best Dog Whisperers | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
The more empathy you have, the better you may be at decoding dogs’ facial expressions.

 

The most reliable indicator of how well you can understand your dog is just practice, plain and simple: People who have owned dogs, or spent time around dogs, are generally more adept at decoding canine cues than those who shy away from anything furry and slobbery. But according to a study in the journal PLOS ONE, experience alone does not a dog whisperer make: Your personality — and, specifically, how empathetic you are — plays a role, too.'

 

By Cari Romm

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Empathetic People Make the Best Dog Whisperers

Empathetic People Make the Best Dog Whisperers | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
The more empathy you have, the better you may be at decoding dogs’ facial expressions.

 

The most reliable indicator of how well you can understand your dog is just practice, plain and simple: People who have owned dogs, or spent time around dogs, are generally more adept at decoding canine cues than those who shy away from anything furry and slobbery. But according to a study in the journal PLOS ONE, experience alone does not a dog whisperer make: Your personality — and, specifically, how empathetic you are — plays a role, too.'

 

By Cari Romm

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How Animal Rescuers Are Burning Out Their Empathy 

How Animal Rescuers Are Burning Out Their Empathy  | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
People don’t always recognize compassion fatigue, says Jeff Boehm, executive director of the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California, the largest marine mammal rehabilitation center in the world. Sometimes referred to as empathy burnout or secondary trauma, the stress of the fatigue can manifest in depression or addiction.

 

Patricia Smith, founder of the Compassion Fatigue Awareness Project, says most people don’t appreciate the strain this work causes. “Not only do [animal welfare workers] suffer daily in the work they do, they also often deal with the public’s total disregard and criticism of their work.

 

Shelter work was one of the most distressing and sorrow-filled work I’ve ever done.” One of Boehm’s biggest concerns is that if people don’t accept compassion fatigue as a very real issue, it—and its downstream psychic consequences—can’t be adequately treated.

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Study: Empathy towards animals and people: the role of gender and length of service in a sample of Italian vets

Study: Empathy towards animals and people: the role of gender and length of service in a sample of Italian vets | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Empathy plays an important role in interpersonal relationships and it also shapes the relationship between human and non-human species, affecting the way animals are treated and cared for.

Veterinarians play a key role in regard to animal welfare and, especially in companion animal practice, they have to care for "non-human patients" as well as for "human clients", showing sensitivity and empathy towards both. However, empathy in veterinary professionals has received very little attention so far.

This study investigated empathy towards animals and people in veterinarians, assessing whether and to what extent they are influenced by variables such as gender and length of service. In fact, these variables have been reported to affect empathy in a variety of caring professions.
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Study: Empathy with Animals and with Humans: Are They Linked?

Study: Empathy with Animals and with Humans: Are They Linked? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
sample of 514 adults completed a postal questionnaire measuring both their empathy with humans (using the Mehrabian and Epstein (1972) Questionnaire for the Measurement of Emotional Empathy) and their empathy with non-human animals (using the Animal Empathy Scale, developed for this study).

 

There was a significant, but modest correlation between the two scales (Kendall's tau=0.26, p<0.001), indicating that although the two types of empathy measure are in some way linked, they are unlikely to tap a single, unitary construct. 

 

Paul, Elizabeth
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Do Dogs Have Empathy for Other Dogs in Distress?

Do Dogs Have Empathy for Other Dogs in Distress? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
We already have lots of data which shows that dogs read the emotions of familiar humans and show empathy and soothing behavior to people when they can (click here or here for more about that). Although we do know that dogs can form true friendships with other dogs (click here to read about that) it is strange to find that there has been little research on whether dogs actually show empathy for other dogs.

 

However some recent research from a team of investigators headed by Mylene Quervel-Chaumette from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Vienna has now provided data showing that dogs do interpret and respond to signs of stress in other dogs, particularly those dogs that they are most familiar with. This research was published in the journal PLoS One.

 

Stanley Coren

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