Empathy and Animals
Follow
Find
15.3K views | +10 today
 
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
onto Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Canine Empathy

Canine Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Sandy Robins discusses canine empathy, and what dogs really think when you are hurt or sad.

 

Picture this. You are taking your dog for a typical neighborhood walk. All of a sudden, you trip over some uneven concrete on the pavement and fall flat on your face, twisting your ankle and remain lying there.

 

Your dog instantly comes over to you and starts whimpering. In your pain, you glance up and he starts licking you. Could that possibly be a look of "canine concern" on his face? Further, he remains by your side until you are able to get up and get moving again.

more...
No comment yet.
Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Animal rights: Think outside the cage

Animal rights: Think outside the cage | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Experts are telling us what anyone with common sense already knew in their hearts: animals have empathy; they are social and loyal; they grieve and mourn their dead; and they feel pain and suffer.


Is it possible for Reno residents to look through the eyes of an animal, show empathy and compassion, and think out of the cage? If so, we can begin to address several animal rights issues here in our own backyard.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How your children can benefit from owning a pet

How your children can benefit from owning a pet | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
A dog, cat, guinea pig or iguana can be a child's best friend in ways you might not expect. Research shows how pets can benefit a child's physical and emotional well-being.


It's easy to see how pets can teach children responsibility. A child as young as 3 can be responsible for giving pets water, and older children can take on tasks like walking the dog.


"Accomplishing tasks appropriate to their age, when taking care of the pet with their parents, makes a child feel more competent," according to child development experts Nienke Endenburg and Ben Baarda.
In addition to increasing self-efficacy, having pets can develop a child's relationship skills, especially empathy, The Washington Post reported. "The reason is obvious: Caring for a pet draws a self-absorbed child away from himself or herself."


Marsha Maxwell, 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Everything you think you know about animals is wrong: How science is forcing us to reconsider the twin myths of human superiority and dumb creatures

Everything you think you know about animals is wrong: How science is forcing us to reconsider the twin myths of human superiority and dumb creatures | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Human beings are the most intelligent, and therefore important, of all the world´s species, right?


We deserve our superior status over other animals because of the following scientific truths: that only humans are self-aware and feel empathy, that we are unique in our abilities to use language and tools, that only we can recognize ourselves in a mirror and understand the passing of time.

But advances in cognitive ethology (the scientific study of animal intelligence, emotions, behaviors, and social life) have now disproved these ´truths´, showing that many other creatures also display a complex range of emotions, highly evolved communication skills, compassion for others, and even intelligence that rivals- or surpasses- our own. These ground-breaking studies force us to ask some uncomfortable questions about our place in the world, and have caused leading experts to call for a radical rethink of the way we treat other animals...


Some of the most heart-warming tales of expressive love and empathy come from the great apes, our closest relatives. Moral philosopher Mark Rowlands recounts the following:

By: Sophie McAdam,

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Therapists gather in Utah for training on equestrian techniques: Therapists said horses have a sense of empathy

Therapists gather in Utah for training on equestrian techniques: Therapists said horses have a sense of empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

 A unique form of therapy involving four-legged companions is growing in popularity, and recently therapists from around the nation gathered in Farmington to learn more about the benefits of using horses in therapy....


Thrap now helps veterans suffering from PTSD. Therapists said horses have a sense of empathy.


“They’re uniquely wired to be aware of their surroundings and to interact with their surroundings in a way that harnesses their intuition, and so they’re just very sensitive beings,” Kaschel said

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Why Do Dogs Yawn? The Neuroscience Of Empathy

Why Do Dogs Yawn? The Neuroscience Of Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

We certainly need to do more research into the MNS in dogs. We need to get Greg Burns to invite his FMRI trained dogs back into the lab and see how their Brodmann’s area responds to con-specific and hetero-specific contagious yawning and empathy type behaviour.


This MNS has motor respresentation which could explain certain imitation behaviours particularly those rooted in survival mechanisms. Perception of another animals emotional state and being able to mentalize other peoples behaviour is shown to activate BA9. This gives rise to motor empathy and then this develops into cognitive empathy as we grow and develop. Then, higher cognitive functions come into play (dogs do not develop much past a two years old- The Goldsmith Study on Emotional Contagion was originally designed for young children). So Contagious yawning is really just a functional substrate of empathy. Why is it, that animals yawn when there are no other beings around? Perhaps only its root lies in social signalling, I guess people talk to themselves when no-one is around!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Helping your child develop animal empathy

Helping your child develop animal empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Shane Jordan, an Education Environmental Practitioner and a qualified Early Years Practitioner, explains the importance of young children developing empathy towards animals and how to provide nurturing experiences for them to be able to do so: 

To understand that nature exists in our own backyards and neighbourhoods can be a very fascinating experience for children. You can read to a child about nature and tell them to appreciate the animals and the trees in the natural world, but unless they physically interact with it themselves they will never truly learn. Environmental Education (EE) is such a necessary part of learning, especially in a child’s early learning years.
more...
Pedegru's curator insight, March 31, 9:35 AM

We all need to develop more empathy but this is an excellent article about how we can start with our children! http://www.pedegru.com/discussion-topic/pets-may-help-cut-heart-disease-risk-american-heart-association

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Three fun family activities to build empathy for animals - Calgary Humane Society

Three fun family activities to build empathy for animals - Calgary Humane Society | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Today on the blog, we wanted to celebrate the weekend by bringing you some fun family activities that you can use to help children build empathy and respect for animals!

Head out on an urban safari! With spring just around the corner many awesome animals are once again making an appearance in Calgary! This makes it the perfect time to head out into the great outdoors to learn more about the cool critters that share our world with an urban safari!


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The surprising psychology behind why some people become environmentalists:

The surprising psychology behind why some people become environmentalists: | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

It may not seem immediately apparent why empathy for other humans translates into concern for the environment, where issues (like air pollution) often affect humans but other times focus on animals, plants or nature itself. Empathy for a tree and empathy for a person do not initially seem as though they would be the same thing.

Nonetheless, the study found a small- to moderate-sized correlation between this measure of empathy and environmental values — as well as environmental activities.


For instance, reported the authors, “the stronger a participant’s dispositional compassion the higher the chance that they would donate to one or more nature or environmental organizations.”

The study didn’t stop there. It also tried to test the “causal relationship” between empathy and environmentalism.

By Chris Mooney

more...
Barbara Kerr's curator insight, March 24, 4:32 PM

Caring for the environment IS caring about people--of course!

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Three fun family activities to build empathy for animals - Calgary Humane Society

Three fun family activities to build empathy for animals - Calgary Humane Society | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Today on the blog, we wanted to celebrate the weekend by bringing you some fun family activities that you can use to help children build empathy and respect for animals!

Head out on an urban safari! With spring just around the corner many awesome animals are once again making an appearance in Calgary! This makes it the perfect time to head out into the great outdoors to learn more about the cool critters that share our world with an urban safari!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Jane Goodall explains empathy and why kids need pets

Jane Goodall explains empathy and why kids need pets | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
The primatologist sat down with MNN, sharing her thoughts on climate change, compassion and a dog named Rusty.


You've said your appreciation for animal sentience began with Rusty, a dog you befriended as a child in England. In what ways could you sense his sentience? Do you think growing up with pets is a good way for children to learn empathy for other animals?

I think it's desperately important for a child to grow up with a pet, providing there's somebody to make sure that they understand how the animal should be treated. And, you know, Rusty worked out problems. He worked out that if he was hot, he could trot down the road, down to the chine and have a little swim and come back. He even did pretend games. He was unlike any other dog I've ever had.



 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Compassion education class teaches middle schoolers empathy, good citizenship

Compassion education class teaches middle schoolers empathy, good citizenship | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

From left, Dominique Edwards and Emma Malzacher, both 12, pet Schatzi as he sits in on their compassion education class. School Resource Officer Rob Tallion of the Kearney Police Department brings animals into the classroom to help students learn empathy.


Dominique is the daughter of Abigail Edwards, and Emma is the daughter of Brian and Sara Malzacher.


By JOSH MOODY

more...
Susan Stillman's curator insight, March 1, 9:41 AM

I love the idea that not only are the students learning about empathy from Schatzi, but also learning about the terrible problem of people neglecting and abusing animals. They learn how they can help. They resilience in Schatzi and his ability, like theirs, to commit to helping others.

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Kids who grow up with dogs and cats are more emotionally intelligent and compassionate

Kids who grow up with dogs and cats are more emotionally intelligent and compassionate | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
1. Compassion: According to this overview of the scientific literature by Nienke Endenburg and Ben Baarda in The Waltham Book of Human-Animal Interaction, 


"If there are pets in the house, parents and children frequently share in taking care of the pet, which suggests that youngsters learn at an early age how to care for and nurture a dependent animal." Even very young children can contribute to the care and feeding of a pet — a 3-year-old can take a bowl of food and set it on the floor for a cat, and at the same age, a child can be taught to stroke an animal nicely, maybe using the back of the hand so they don't grab the animal. Supervising kids during the first few interactions is a teaching moment.


Later, once they have learned the ropes, their memory and understanding of a life outside themselves will be stimulated each time they interact with the animals. Older kids can be responsible for walking a dog or playing with it in the yard, cleaning out a cat's litter box, or taking veggie scraps from dinner to a rabbit or hamster.


A study of 3- to 6-year-olds found that kids with pets had more empathy towards other animals and human beings, while another study found that even just having an animal in a classroom made fourth-graders more compassionate. 

more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 29, 11:50 PM

I have heard the claim, especially by equine therapists, that "the horse is the therapist."  I think that applies to virtually all dependent creatures that children (and adults) interact with..  I heard a cute story that dogs were sent to earth to deliver the message of peace.  The dogs ate the message, but are still trying to deliver it. :) -Lon 

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How your children can benefit from owning a pet

How your children can benefit from owning a pet | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
A dog, cat, guinea pig or iguana can be a child's best friend in ways you might not expect. Research shows how pets can benefit a child's physical and emotional well-being.


It's easy to see how pets can teach children responsibility. A child as young as 3 can be responsible for giving pets water, and older children can take on tasks like walking the dog.


"Accomplishing tasks appropriate to their age, when taking care of the pet with their parents, makes a child feel more competent," according to child development experts Nienke Endenburg and Ben Baarda.
In addition to increasing self-efficacy, having pets can develop a child's relationship skills, especially empathy, The Washington Post reported. "The reason is obvious: Caring for a pet draws a self-absorbed child away from himself or herself."


Marsha Maxwell, 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED

Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
The subjects in the experiment did not know the articles were bogus. Nor did they know that there were actually four slightly different versions of the newspaper articles, each portraying a different victim: a puppy, an adult dog, a human infant, or a human adult. After they read one of the four news stories, each subject completed a scale which measured how much empathy and emotional distress they felt for the victim of the beating.

Arluke and Levin reported the results of their study at the 2013 meeting of the American Sociological Association. As you might guess, the story in which the victim was a human adult elicited, by far, the lowest levels of emotional distress in the readers.


The “winner” when it came to evoking empathy was not the puppy but the human infant. The puppy, however, came in a close second with the adult dog not far behind.


Arluke and Levin concluded that species is important when it comes to generating sympathy with the downtrodden. But they argued that the critical difference in responses to the stories was based on our special concern for creatures that are innocent and defenseless.


by HAL HERZOG

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Pets Help Teach Kids Empathy

Pets Help Teach Kids Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

One of the cornerstones of EQ is empathy, which should be taught and modeled starting in early childhood. A variety of research in the U.S. and Britain, including by the late psychologist Robert Poresky of Kansas State University, has shown a correlation between attachment to a pet and higher empathy scores.


The reason is obvious: Caring for a pet draws a self-absorbed child away from himself or herself.


Empathy also involves the ability to read nonverbal cues — facial expressions, body language, gestures — and pets offer nothing but nonverbal cues. Hearing a kitten yowl when it wants to eat or seeing a dog run to the door when it wants to go outside get kids to think, “What are their needs, and what can I do to help?”


By Denise Daniels

image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Want to raise empathetic kids? Get them a dog.

Want to raise empathetic kids? Get them a dog. | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

By Denise Daniels 


....pets can be invaluable at teaching families, especially children, “emotional intelligence,” or EQ—a measure of empathy and the ability to understand and connect with others.


More than intelligence, EQ is the best indicator of a child’s likely success in school. In fact, kindergarten teachers have reported that EQ is more important than the ability to read or hold a pencil. And unlike IQ, which is fixed at birth, EQ can grow and be nurtured, and what better way than with a loving pet who is a gift to the whole family?


Here are five ways in which pets can help children develop their EQ.

  • By developing empathy...
  • By teaching responsibility and boosting self-esteem...
  • By reducing stress...
  • By helping a child learn to read...
  • By helping children express their emotions....
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Helping your child develop animal empathy

Helping your child develop animal empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Shane Jordan, an Education Environmental Practitioner and a qualified Early Years Practitioner, explains the importance of young children developing empathy towards animals and how to provide nurturing experiences for them to be able to do so: 

To understand that nature exists in our own backyards and neighbourhoods can be a very fascinating experience for children. You can read to a child about nature and tell them to appreciate the animals and the trees in the natural world, but unless they physically interact with it themselves they will never truly learn. Environmental Education (EE) is such a necessary part of learning, especially in a child’s early learning years.
more...
Pedegru's curator insight, March 31, 9:35 AM

We all need to develop more empathy but this is an excellent article about how we can start with our children! http://www.pedegru.com/discussion-topic/pets-may-help-cut-heart-disease-risk-american-heart-association

Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

"The Age of Empathy" excerpt 6 (on reciprocity and resource sharing) - YouTube

The Age of Empathy" excerpt 6 (on reciprocity and resource sharing)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

3 Awesome Farm Sanctuary Programs That Teach Kids Compassion for All Animals

3 Awesome Farm Sanctuary Programs That Teach Kids Compassion for All Animals | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

These awesome programs will definitely make you wish you were a kid again so you could go to camp!


There is nothing like seeing a child play with an animal. Not only are these interactions, well, adorable, but they also set the foundation for that child’s future relationship with animals.


Studies have shown that children who grow up with pets are more empathetic and have lower levels of anxiety.  While these studies focus on cats and dogs, many people see the same benefits from interactions with all types of animals, including farm animals.


Because really, who wouldn’t feel more relaxed after hugging a cow or playing with a chicken?

more...
Crystal Bellert's curator insight, March 27, 1:58 AM

The article describes three farm sanctuaries in America that allow children to interact with and care for farm animals.  Through their interactions with the animals, children can learn to care for another living creature, and that animals are not just a commodity.  In the future, I would love to own a block of land offering similar experiences.  As animals are very unpredictable and harbour many diseases, occupational health and safety will definitely be high on my agenda.

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Entangled Empathy: From an Ethics of Justice to an Ethics of Empathy: Lori Gruen & Edwin Rutsch

Entangled Empathy: From an Ethics of Justice to an Ethics of Empathy:  Lori Gruen & Edwin Rutsch | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Lori Gruen is Professor of Philosophy, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University where she also coordinates Wesleyan Animal Studies.


Her work lies at the intersection of ethical theory and practice, with a particular focus on issues that impact those often overlooked in traditional ethical investigations, e.g. women, people of color, non-human animals. She has published extensively on topics in animal ethics, ecofeminism, and practical ethics more broadly


 Lori is author of, 
Entangled Empathy, An Alternative Ethic for Our Relationships with Animals.

"Empathy is also something we are taught to "get over" or grow out of.  We learn to quash our caring reactions for others, and our busy lives and immediate preoccupations provide  excuses for not developing empathy."



From the book description, "In Entangled Empathy, scholar and activist Lori Gruen argues that rather than focusing on animal "rights," we ought to work to make our relationships with animals right by empathetically responding to their needs, interests, desires, vulnerabilities, hopes, and unique perspectives. Pointing out that we are already entangled in complex and life-altering relationships with other animals, Gruen guides readers through a new way of thinking about - and practicing - animal ethics."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

What Can Bonobos Tell Us about Ourselves?

What Can Bonobos Tell Us about Ourselves? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Famed primatologist Frans de Waal takes on the unproven assumption that apes and humans are natural-born killers.


But what if we descend not from a blustering chimp-like ancestor but from an empathic bonobo-like ape?


The bonobo’s body proportions—its long legs and narrow shoulders, even its grasping feet—seem to perfectly fit the descriptions of Ardi, as do its relatively small canines.


Why was the bonobo overlooked? What if the chimpanzee, instead of being an ancestral prototype, is in fact a violent outlier in an otherwise relatively peaceful lineage? Ardi is telling us something, and there may exist little agreement about what she is saying, but why do I always hear the drums of war while listening to evolutionary scenarios. This has been going on unabated since Konrad Lorenz and Robert Ardrey.


By Frans de Waal 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

(video) Puppy training offers troubled teens empathy, compassion

(video) Puppy training offers troubled teens empathy, compassion | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Video: http://www.myfoxphilly.com/clip/11181428/teen-boys-train-puppies-to-gain-empathy 

More than 10 years ago, Home for Life Animal Sanctuary teamed up with St. Paul schools for a once a week program paired up with adult dogs. They jumped at the chance for the boys to learn to patiently train puppies.

Within just five weeks no one can ignore the difference. The boys were showing empathy and compassion translating to better results in their 6 hours of daily class time. Love and gentle nature are often not encouraged or even safe on the streets.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Fish Empathy Quilt

Fish Empathy Quilt | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
OK, I had to admit that I had my doubts when I heard the first rumblings about a giant “fish quilt” we were making to raise awareness about the fact that fish are intelligent, intriguing animals who feel pain just as all other animals do and that they don’t deserve to be violently killed for food, painfully hooked for “sport,” or cruelly confined in aquariums. But now that I see the finished product, I have to admit that it’s pretty cool.
more...
No comment yet.