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Scientists unlock animal intelligence - They show empathy.

Scientists unlock animal intelligence - They show empathy. | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The more we study animals, the less special we seem. Baboons can distinguish between written words and gibberish. Monkeys seem to be able to do multiplication. Apes can delay instant gratification longer than a human child can. They plan ahead. They make war and peace. They show empathy.

 

Empathy isn't just for humans
It was once thought the control of emotions and the ability to empathise and socialise separated us from our primate cousins. But chimps console, and fight, each other. They also try to soothe an upset companion, grooming and putting their arms around him.

"I see plenty of empathy in my chimpanzees," de Waal said.

 

http://j.mp/LvuwM5

 

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Empathy and Animals
International News and Information about Empathy and Compassion with, by and for Animals - for more see: CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

To Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

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Dogs feel empathy for humans, study suggests

Dogs feel empathy for humans, study suggests | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

A recent study by UK researchers from Goldsmiths College in London suggests that dogs may be capable of empathy.


They set out to collect 18 untrained pet dogs and place a stranger and the dogs owner in different places. The owner and stranger would alternately express themselves vocally in various ways. 15 of the 18 dogs sought out the person making distressed sounds, even if it was the stranger(Garrett).


=====================
this demonstrates that dogs are capable of exhibiting consolatory behavior, and thus, a degree of empathy in trying to comfort the sad person.
==============

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, July 8, 11:56 AM

Dog owners have known this for a long time, but scientists are more careful naming things. 

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A man of compassion: Interview with Professor Marc Bekoff

A man of compassion: Interview with Professor Marc Bekoff | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Expanding our compassion footprint to other animals as well as people is good for everyone, according to eminent ecologist and evolutionary biologist Professor Marc Bekoff.


The author of 25 books on animal behaviour and emotions spoke with Katrina Fox via Skype on the eve of his trip to Australia to speak on a panel organised by the University of Technology Sydney’s Centre for Compassionate Conservation.\


 Cull & Contain
or Compassion?
 


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Dogs in classroom helping students learn empathy

Dogs in classroom helping students learn empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

The concept is pretty simple: bring kind rescue dogs into classrooms to help kids learn empathy and pique their interest in difficult subject matter. But the effects are profound.


“Our 5th grade children, I would say their demeanor has changed as a direct result of the compassion they have learned to show to an animal they know was a rescue animal,” Royall Elementary School principal Julie Smith said.


“Even for my toughest kids, the most street savvy, it almost physically transforms them into a child with empathy. "

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DOLPHINS REACTING TO MIRROR UNDERWATER - self awareness - YouTube

Good report by cnn--the report couldnt be saved to favorites and would have aged off the system. Mutual of omahas Wild Kingdom started the change of animal a...
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Chimpanzees empathise with human strangers

Chimpanzees empathise with human strangers | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Whether animals have the ability to show empathy similar to humans has been the subject for debate for many years. Matthew Campbell and Frans de Waal, who work at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, set about to test this under controlled conditions.


Research undertaken by the two found that chimpanzees can empathise with humans, even if the human is unfamiliar to them. The team explain, “Chimpanzees showed that the ability to connect with unfamiliar individuals is not unique to humans.” However, the chimpanzees did not empathise with baboons, a species that was unknown to the chimps in the experiment.


===========================

Contagious yawning was key in the study,
as with this mimicked action the team were
able to measure how empathetic the
chimps were – the more yawns,
the greater the level of empathy.

============

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Chloe Cudaback's curator insight, April 10, 2:00 AM

This is incredible evidence of the undeniable biological bond that chimpanzees have to humans. I find that too often chimpanzees get grouped with monkeys and baboons, gorillas and other apes. But rarely, would a human truly group chimpanzees with humans. This is amazing research that shows chimpanzees sense more of an attachment with humans than with baboons. 

Yawning was a huge part of this experiment. When humans yawn because they see another human yawn, it is because they empathize with the other human's tiredness. If chimpanzees are mimicking the yawning as well, this could be evidence that a chimpanzee understands human actions and can draw from their own mind to act on these actions. 

 

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Study: Chimpanzees empathize with group mates and humans, but not with baboons or unfamiliar chimpanzees

Study: Chimpanzees empathize with group mates and humans, but not with baboons or unfamiliar chimpanzees | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Abstract: Human empathy can extend to strangers and even other species, but it is unknown whether non-humans are similarly broad in their empathic responses.


===================

We explored the breadth and

flexibility of empathy in chimpanzees,

a close relative of humans.

==========


We used contagious yawning to measure involuntary empathy and showed chimpanzees videos of familiar humans, unfamiliar humans and gelada baboons (an unfamiliar species). We tested whether each class of stimuli elicited contagion by comparing the effect of yawn and control videos. After including previous data on the response to ingroup and outgroup chimpanzees, we found that familiar and unfamiliar humans elicited contagion equal to that of ingroup chimpanzees.


Gelada baboons did not elicit contagion, and the response to them was equal to that of outgroup chimpanzees. However, the chimpanzees watched the outgroup chimpanzee videos more than any other. The combination of high interest and low contagion may stem from hostility towards unfamiliar chimpanzees, which may interfere with an empathic response.


Overall, chimpanzees showed flexibility in that they formed an empathic connection with a different species, including unknown members of that species. These results imply that human empathic flexibility is shared with related species.


by

Matthew W. Campbell
Frans B. M. de Waal


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Audio: Jill Pruetz on Empathy Among Primates

Audio: Jill Pruetz on Empathy Among Primates | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Host Charity Nebbe talked with Pruetz to find out more about the way these primates develop and use tools, and how their cultures form.


She learns about a time when the chimpanzees helped Pruetz navigate a raging wildfire. Pruetz also shares a story about the rescue of a baby chimpanzee, and the remarkable empathy she says was shown to the baby and mother by a young chimpanzee named Mike.


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the remarkable empathy she says was

shown to the baby and mother by

a young chimpanzee named Mike.

=============

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What Bonobos Can Tell Us About Our Parents

What Bonobos Can Tell Us About Our Parents | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
A recent study reveals unexpected similarities between the emotional lives of human and ape kids—bound together by the quality of parenting.


Their results, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal strong similarities between the emotional development of bonobos and that of human children—especially about the relationship between mothering, emotional regulation, and empathy for others.


================

...study confirmed that emotion regulation
is an essential part of empathy,
in two primates who share 99 percent
of the same DNA:
bonobos and humans.
========= 


By William Pettus

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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 7, 12:16 PM

Very interesting.

 

I wonder if the same holds true for chimps.

 

What does this say about the ways we ought to raise our kids, in order to produce the best possible human beings from what can be given as parents?


Think about it.

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How Dogs Read Our Moods: Emotion Detector Found In Fido's Brain

How Dogs Read Our Moods: Emotion Detector Found In Fido's Brain | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Anyone who's had MRI knows how hard it is to lie motionless. But the dogs that participated in this brain-scanning experiment aced the test. Maybe the treats did it.


"When you looked at how dogs respond to emotional cues in sounds, it's very similar to how humans respond," Andics says. "It's in the same brain region ... and is stronger with positive vocalizations than negative ones."

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Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding?

Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Is the mirror system key to how social understanding is created in the brain?


Researchers from Denmark released a new study on Feb. 24 showing that specific brain cells called “mirror neurons” may help people interpret the actions they see other people perform.


========================

Mirror neurons are thought to be

specialized brain cells that allow

you to learn and empathize by

observing the actions

of another person.

========


The new study from Aarhus University and the University of Copenhagen will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. The research was led by postdoctoral research fellow John Michael.

by Christopher Bergland

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 25, 9:45 AM

It would make intuitive sense.  If you cannot somehow connect to the other, how can you have a relationship, let alone, a positive one where there is understanding?

 

Could be an interesting technique to boost empathy and relate to people from other cultures and backgrounds.  If these neurons can be built up or analyzed in real time, it might be a valuable tool for briding gaps between people from different cultural backgrounds (or, at least, weeding out those who really shouldn't be interacting with people from different backgrounds in the first place).

 

I wonder if rats and other non-primate social animals have these mirror neurons as well.

 

I think it's good to focus on confirming these results and to determine whether mirror neurons are distinctly a neuron class onto their own or are simply neurons that fulfil multiple roles.  This last question, especially, would answer a lot of questions about how the brain works in one fell swoop, showing whether or not there are specific types of neurons in the brain, or whether each neuron can fulfil multiple roles, even in this highly specialized form.

 

 

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It's Time to Accept That Elephants, Like Us, Are Empathetic Beings

It's Time to Accept That Elephants, Like Us, Are Empathetic Beings | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
The evidence for empathy in elephants seems overwhelming, so can we now draw on our own empathetic nature to end their slaughter?


Elephants, we all know, are in peril. We humans are waging what amounts to a war against them because they have something we want and cannot make on our own: ivory.


Earlier this month, we learned that the West African country of Gabon has lost more than half its elephants—11,000—in the last ten years alone.


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Elephant Empathy:

One Example After Another

===========


But why did it take an experiment? Research on elephants is full of examples of the animals apparently behaving empathetically—recognizing and responding to another elephant's pain or problem. Often, they even make heroic efforts to assist one another.


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Elephants Feel Empathy, Console One Another

Elephants Feel Empathy, Console One Another | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
According to a new study, elephants can feel empathy and even comfort one another in times of stress.
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Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy

Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Watch the video Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy on Yahoo News .


Experiments are underway at Stanford University to determine if immersive technology can result in more empathy for the environment. As AP's Haven Daley explains, the research uses the latest in virtual reality equipment. (Aug. 14)

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The amazing emotional intelligence of our primate cousins

The amazing emotional intelligence of our primate cousins | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

by Danielle Radin

Gorillas cooperating to dismantle poachers's snares, altruistic, food sharing chimpanzees, grieving lemurs performing death rituals ... Danielle Radin finds an extraordinary emotional depth and capacity for empathy in our fellow primates.


These new findings suggest a level of empathy and social welfare amongst primates never before studied.

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Raven Empathy « Life « Science Today

Raven Empathy « Life  « Science Today | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
New research shows that ravens may feel empathy.


Empathy, like many other traits, was long thought to be a human-specific feature. But recent research has revealed that animals from chimpanzees to dogs to rats can feel empathy.


Frans de Waal, PhD, one of the leading researchers in animal behavior and the author ofThe Age of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society, has said, "The possibility that empathy resides in parts of the brain so ancient that we share them with rats should give pause to anyone comparing politicians with those poor, underestimated creatures."


Last week, two Austrian researchers found evidence of empathetic behavior in another creature, ravens.

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Through the Wormhole: Elephants in the Mirror: Theory of Mind: YouTube

ELEPHANTS POSSESS A THEORY OF MIND

Dolphins, too:


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You need 12 hugs every day (creates empathy and understanding)

You need 12 hugs every day (creates empathy and understanding) | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

"The skin is the largest sensory organ in the body.  Physical touch, in particular hugs, are extremely beneficial physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually for both parties involved.


 Hugging builds trust and secures a sense of safety.  It builds self-esteem, relaxes muscles and releases tension.  It boosts oxytocin and serotonin levels.  It strengthens the immune system and balances the nervous system.  


Energetically it teaches us to give and receive, showing us how love flows both ways, and the synergistic flow of energy back and forth between two people creates empathy and understanding."


 ========================

the synergistic flow of energy back and

 forth between two people creates

empathy and understanding."

===========

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Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy

Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Watch the video Virtual Cow Experiment Aims to Teach Empathy on Yahoo News . Experiments are underway at Stanford University to determine if immersive technology can result in more empathy for the environment. As AP's Haven Daley explains, the research uses the latest in virtual reality equipment. (Aug. 14)
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Chimps catch people’s yawns in sign of flexible empathy | Science News

Chimps catch people’s yawns in sign of flexible empathy | Science News | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees may show humanlike empathy, as evidenced by their contagious yawning.


Chimpanzees possess a flexible, humanlike sensitivity to the mental states of others, even strangers from another species, researchers suggest March 11 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Empathy’s roots go back at least to the common ancestor of humans and chimps, they say.


========================

Having socially connected with

facility workers, chimps reacted empathically

to human strangers who yawned,

the researchers propose.

==============


BY BRUCE BOWER 

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Empathy chimpanzees offer is key to understanding human engagement

Empathy chimpanzees offer is key to understanding human engagement | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
New findings show that chimpanzees exhibit flexibility in their empathy, just as humans do. This may help explain the evolution of how and when humans engage with others and choose to offer flexibility, and how we can do so more.


While it's been long known that human empathy can extend to family, friends, strangers and even other species, it has been unknown until now whether nonhumans are similarly broad in their empathic responses.


======================

it has been unknown until now whether

nonhumans are similarly broad

in their empathic responses.

==========


To answer this question, Campbell and de Waal used contagious yawning as a measure of involuntary empathy. According to Campbell, "Copying the facial expressions of others helps us to adopt and understand their current state."


Emory Health Sciences

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Elephant Empathy | ScienceTake | The New York Times - YouTube

Elephant Empathy | ScienceTake | The New York Times - YouTube | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

Elephant Empathy | ScienceTake | The New York Times

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NY Times Video: Elephants Give a Helping Trunk: Evidence of Empathy

NY Times Video: Elephants Give a Helping Trunk: Evidence of Empathy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it
When an elephant is in distress, scientists have found, nearby elephants offer it a reassuring touch to make it feel better.


Elephants are known to be highly social and intelligent. Now there is evidence that they engage in something that looks very much like a group hug when a fellow elephant is in distress.


=====================

looks very much like a group hug

when a fellow elephant is

in distress.

=========


Joshua Plotnick, who leads a conservation and education group called Think Elephants, and teaches conservation at Mahidol University in Thailand, studied elephants at a park in Chiang Rai Province in Thailand, to look for consolation behavior.



Via Edwin Rutsch
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Susan Sharma's curator insight, February 28, 1:57 AM

Look for photographs of elephants at http://wildscapes.net for more empathy pics of elephants in Corbett National Park..

Betty Skeet's curator insight, February 28, 3:50 AM

There is so muchwecanlearn from other fellow inhabitants of this planet.

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Interview With an Author - Joshua Plotnik - Elephant Emapthy

Interview With an Author - Joshua Plotnik - Elephant Emapthy | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

“Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) reassure others in distress”, Research paper author Dr. Joshua Plotnik.

J: Can you tell us a bit about the research you publish today?


JP: How animals resolve conflicts is an exciting area of research, and has been expanding ever since the first studies on it in chimpanzees by Frans de Waal and colleagues in the late 1970s. Usually, scientists study two forms of conflict resolution: reconciliation (which looks at how aggressors and victims “make up” after fights) and consolation (which looks at how uninvolved bystanders reassure the victims). Interestingly, reconciliation is relatively common in the animal kingdom, while consolation is relatively rare.


=====================

One hypothesis suggests the reason

for this is that consolation has

empathic underpinnings unique

to only a few species

in the animal kingdom. 

=========


One hypothesis suggests the reason for this is that consolation has empathic underpinnings unique to only a few species in the animal kingdom. To date, only the great apes, canines and corvids have shown consolation. Elephants make an interesting and unique test subject because they are well-known for their intelligence and social complexity (as well as acts of helping behavior and empathy), but much of the evidence for these capacities is anecdotal.


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How Elephants Show Empathy - YouTube

Researchers working in Thailand recently asserted that elephants are capable of empathy and published a paper outlining how it is that they do so.

The 26 elephants involved in the study live in captivity and were observed for between 30 and 180 minutes a day for about a year. 

In that time, it was documented how elephants responded to both stressful situations they experienced themselves and those encountered by others in their group.


===========================
Following the frightening incidents,

the pachyderms would comfort

one another by gathering closer

and making physical contact. 

================

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Can Elephants Show, Feel Empathy?

Can Elephants Show, Feel Empathy? | Empathy and Animals | Scoop.it

A new study examines how Asian elephants console one another in times of stress.


========================

Elephants are capable of empathy,

a new study suggests.

=========


The findings, published in the journal PeerJ, describe how the animals reassure one another by touching and talking to each other when in distress. The study involved studying the behavior of 26 captive elephants in Thailand over a period of one year. Since periods of distress can't be planned, researchers spent 30 to 180 minutes each day watching and recording the elephants’ behavior.

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