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The 10 Types of Writers Block (and How to Overcome Them)

The 10 Types of Writers Block (and How to Overcome Them) | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Writer's Block. It sounds like a fearsome condition, a creative blockage. The end of invention. But what is it, really? Part of why Writer's Block sounds so dreadful and insurmountable is the fact that nobody ever takes it apart.

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9 Outstanding Apps to Teach Creative Writing

9 Outstanding Apps to Teach Creative Writing | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

"Creative writing is something students get to learn by the frequency of practice, the more they practice the better they become.Some students develop a negative attitude towards writing because they were never been shown the real joy they can get in engaging in such an act. The traditional way of teaching writing is no longer working. We can not provide a pen and blank paper and expect our students to produce solid pieces of writing. This is a process of commitment, students need to feel connected to the writing task they are immersed in, they need to love it and to love it they need to see why they need to write after all."


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Why writers and editors make simple, preventable mistakes | Articles

Why writers and editors make simple, preventable mistakes | Articles | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
The same internal wiring that makes us efficient also makes us error prone.

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What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning

What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

If you’re an educator, surely you know that technology has and will continue to have an incredible impact on learning.

The talks are in split into the following categories:

* General - learn about making technology work in education and more.

* Sharing education - exploring open, shared education.

* Creativity and innovation - new ways to foster innovition and the creative spirit.

* Internet and new media - how does the Internet and new media impact teaching and learning?

* Leadership -new leadership skills.

* Educational technology - explore technology made for education.

* Brain and Psychology - how does the brain work?

* Technology education - what is the state of technology education?

* Teaching methods - check out innovative teaching methods.

* Institution - how does technology impact institutions.


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Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 9:23 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. It looks like you have a great site here!
Ken Morrison's comment, October 2, 2012 8:39 PM
Thank you for the rescoop Charles
Ken Morrison's comment, October 2, 2012 8:39 PM
Thank you for the rescoop Charles
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How to Write Short Stories – 10 Tips for Creative Writing by Chief Editor : Your Story Club

How to Write Short Stories – 10 Tips for Creative Writing by Chief Editor : Your Story Club | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
First step to write short story is to understand five basic elements of it. Ten Tips, by our Chief Editor, for How to Write Short Stories are vivid explanation of these elements with easily understandable examples.

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The Best Way to Become a Better Writer

The Best Way to Become a Better Writer | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
The Best Way to Become a Better Writer by Joe Bunting (@joebunting) http://t.co/zMJ2Th9c #writing #homeschool...

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E.M. Forster: Why I Stopped Writing Novels (1958)

E.M. Forster: Why I Stopped Writing Novels (1958) | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
E.M. Forster's later years are something of a riddle. After publishing five novels, including the classics A Passage to India and Howards End, Forster stopped writing fiction at the age of 45.

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Bunch Translate: Thoughts on Editing

Bunch Translate: Thoughts on Editing | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

Thoughts on Editing
Editing is of course a big part of what we do as writers and translators. We all should edit our own work, including when we write e-mail (one reason I blog is to constantly work on my English and my own writing and editing skills).

Hemingway liked to refer to good writing as "architecture, not interior design". What he meant by that is that good writing tends to be more spare (plain) and simple, rather than ostentatious, cluttered and wordy. I like that metaphor and I agree with Hemingway on that (you should too, probably, unless you are Thomas Mann, or writing lyric poetry).

The whole point of your writing should be to get your point across minimalistically, or, with the least number of words and effort required on the part of your reader. Long sentences often can be confusing and misleading. Long words are generally not as good as short ones, in English.

Here are some tips I have found over the years as a writer, that I would like to pass along:

Let your writing sit for a while before you edit it. I am always amazed that when I read something I wrote after taking a jog or letting the text sit overnight, that I come to the text with fresh eyes. It is almost like I am editing something written by someone else.

If you are editing someone else's translated work, follow what Anthony Pym calls the notion of binary errors vs. non-binary errors. What does he mean ?
Binary errors are errors in which there are only two possible choices in translation, and the translator made the wrong choice (translating Löwe in German into anything other than lion in English [aka monosemic words]).
Non-binary errors are really not errors, because more than one choice was possible (aka polysemic words[). This is where style comes in. If you correct a non-binary error, you are imposing your own style on the translation, but it is not really an error.

Think structurally. What does that mean ?
Take longer sentences and break them up into shorter sentences.
Look to reduce (or add) any punctuation that should be changed (removing unnecessary commas will make your text flow a lot better, etc.).
Do the paragraphs follow the rule that one paragraph should equal one thought and also the details of that one thought ? If not, break the paragraphs up.
Make sure you use white space. I once took a technical writing class in San Francisco and the teacher taught us that "white space is good". Use a lot of it. Don't over-clutter your page. People like white space and they read text that has a lot of it (look at good advertising sometime). Notice the white space around my text in this blog post. Would my blog post be better if I took the white space out ? (no).

Don't let your ego get involved !
If you are editing: don't just edit to show how good you are, or (even worse) to make the writer look bad ("malicious editing").
If you are being edited: think of the editor as your ally, not your rival.


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Common Sense Journalism: How to explain editing?

We've just come through an "interesting" (if you use the Chinese saying's ambiguous connotation of the term) couple of years here in the basement of the Coliseum as we try to refashion a journalism and mass communications curriculum that is at the same time forward-looking and flexible, yet retains the foundation of good journalism.

During the course of this, we had a family spat about editing's place. To help get the changes through -- because I thought it more important to seriously loosen our current lockstep curriculum so students have more flexibility -- I did not push to have our current required copy-editing course kept as required.

Some faculty were concerned by that, a bit of jostling ensued, and we voted over broadcast faculty objections to make editing required again for all journalism students. More jostling, another vote, and we compromised: the full editing course will be a directed elective, but an editing module will be put into our first reporting/writing course (the one after the general mass media writing).

It's an agreement I can live with, though it means I have to fashion yet another syllabus, this time for the module. (I am convinced the road to perdition is paved with curriculum-change syllabuses.) One of the broadcast arguments was, essentially, "We already teach editing as part of writing."

But it set me to thinking about how to explain editing and why it is different from writing, especially in its teaching, and why it can't really be effectively taught as part of writing (though certainly some self-editing has to be taught as part of that).

Editing is about approaching a story, in whatever medium, in a different way, with a different mindset.


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Two Disturbing Short Stories for Halloween

Two Disturbing Short Stories for Halloween | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Together, these stories are less than three pages long.  Both of these short stories have been published together on more than one occasion.  I wrote these early on and they are related.  They are ...

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Botany Sci Fi? Short stories as tools for teaching

Botany Sci Fi? Short stories as tools for teaching | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

I particuarly enjoyed the short story at the end of this week's Nature,  called "Without", by Fran Wilde  (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7416/full/489466a.html). I found another story she'd written, "Everybody loves a hero" (http://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/superhero/fran-wilde/everyone-loves-a-hero), and also discovered the site "Daily Science Fiction".

 

With just a little exploring, I found two stories that could be effective ways to start discussions in a biology course.

 

"A concert of flowers"  features a 'doctor of alien botany', and addresses questions of conservation and the value of species (http://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/biotech/kate-o-connor/a-concert-of-flowers).

 

"Sweet as peaches" looks at a world that struggles to sustain the human population, so children grow up never knowing peaches (http://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/biotech/shane-d-rhinewald/sweet-as-peaches).

 

The story in Nature, Without, is also in the 'collapsed ecosystem' genre, which I find particularly effective as teaching tools. Yes, it's sci fi, but how sure are we that it isn't where we're headed?

 

I should also share a link (but not necessarily an endorsement) to "Silent Running", the 1972 film set "in a future where all flora is extinct on Earth. An astronaut is given orders to destroy the last of Earth's plant life being kept in a greenhouse on board a spacecraft" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067756/).


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Online Books, Poems, Short Stories - Read Print Library

Online Books, Poems, Short Stories - Read Print Library | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

A free online library, Read Print puts thousands of online books at your fingertips.


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Strange and Weird But Not True Short Stories

Strange and Weird But Not True Short Stories | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Five Strange and Weird But not True Short Stories. Great for reading when you are sittingon coffeebreak, at lunch, or in a doctor’s office waiting and waiting. Great for shortreading one at a time or all together.

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Creative Writing: Topics, Tips & Guidelines

Creative Writing: Topics, Tips & Guidelines | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

Finding and choosing the right creative writing topics is often the most challenging.Before we can write we need to have something to write about. John Dewey stated it perfectly when he said there is a big difference between “having to say something and having something to say.” So how do we go about finding the right topics?


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Advice for copy editors: This means you | Bleacher Report – The Blog

Advice for copy editors: This means you | Bleacher Report – The Blog | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

Today’s post collects some great advice for copy editors. Come back here, writers! You’re copy editors too.

The first and often the best copy editor a story is going to get is the writer. Who’s better able to check the facts and make sure the names are spelled correctly than the person with enough knowledge about the subject to write the story in the first place?

The 21st century publishing model has not been kind to copy editors. Copy desks have shrunk or been eliminated and those that remain must operate at warp speed. Bleacher Report has a small army of copy editors, but they’re looking at more than 800 stories a day.

If you’re a writer and you’re counting on the copy editors to catch your mistakes, you’re probably going to be disappointed.


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Proofreaders, editors and other dilemmas

Proofreaders, editors and other dilemmas | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
So, here's the thing! I just had a 2* review stating that one of my books contained 'poor grammar and sloppy editing'! I mean, who says things like that to an author with an ego as thin as tissue...

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How to write backward (advice from Edgar Allen Poe)

How to write backward (advice from Edgar Allen Poe) | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

This is an excerpt of Edgar Allen Poe's "On the Philosophy of Composition": "CHARLES DICKENS, in a note now lying before me, ...

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Writing & Poetry Contests: poetry, prose, non-fiction, novels, short stories, flash fiction, screenplays

Writing & Poetry Contests and Competitions: poetry, non-fiction, novels, short story, flash fiction, plays, screenplays.


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The Lost Art of Letter Writing, Rediscovered in Two Distinct Novels

The Lost Art of Letter Writing, Rediscovered in Two Distinct Novels | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society are two great novels with letter writing at their heart. (I've read both these novels, they're great!

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Proofreading and Editing - Practice Makes Perfect

Proofreading and Editing - Practice Makes Perfect | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

Proofreading and editing are crucial components of any writer's work. Many writers submit their work to professional proofreaders and editors. This may simply be because they are too busy or it may be because they don't have the necessary skills to proofread their own work to the standard required.

Even if you never become someone who can proofread or edit professionally, the skills involved are well worth learning, especially if you are a writer that often has to submit work to somebody else. You may only want to submit articles to a directory to help promote your online business but proofreading and editing your work can save both time and money during the submission process.

If your work is riddled with errors, from spelling mistakes and grammatical errors to more specific things that might vary from publication to publication, the chances are that your submission will not be accepted before you correct them all. This can take up valuable time as you first address the problems and then re-submit and wait for the review process to go through its motions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7192470


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online manuscript editing's comment, July 26, 2012 8:19 AM
We do Proofreading and editing to eradicate grammatical errors and spelling mistakes, so it is not a difficult task but requires time and strong knowledge of english grammer so that sentence are making sense.

<a href="http://www.manuscriptedit.com/">writing</a>;
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Publishing your own book; writing, editing & proofreading tips

Publishing your own book; writing, editing & proofreading tips | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Publishing your own book; writing, editing & proofreading tips
Updated: Monday, 03 Sep 2012, 3:48 PM EDT
Published : Monday, 03 Sep 2012, 3:44 PM EDT

Seth Stutman
AMHERST, Mass. (Mass Appeal) - If you've always wanted to publish your own book, but weren't sure where to start, Kitty Axelson-Berry from Modern Memoirs publishing gave some tips about writing.

Writing, editing & proofreading tips:

Editing is the process of reading and changing words or images so that they serve your purpose. Your stories should be accurate, understandable, and easy to read.

Edit first for repetition, inconsistency, contradictions, logic, and tone -- too much bitterness, irony? not enough heroics for your taste?

Edit next for paragraph and chapter breaks. Re-think chapter titles and subtitles, book title and subtitle.

Edit next for accuracy (fact-checking). Did you type 9/12 instead of 9/11? Is president Lyndon Johnson's name spelled correctly?

Create a styleguide so that you are consistent. E.g. Oxford comma, numbers (money, streets, time), abbreviations, asides (italics? parentheses?) Idiosyncratic grammar or vocabulary?

Edit for styles you have decided on.

Read text out loud to others. Reading your manuscript in the presence of others makes you aware of the affect of your writing on people and its implications. Do they understand what you are saying? Do they feel what you wanted them to feel?

Edit for extra spaces, tabs, spelling, grammar, curly quotes, other technicalities.

If you hire a professional, think of four levels of copy editing and proofreading:


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Caren Cantrell's curator insight, July 29, 2013 11:49 AM

Just some basic tips to keep in mind when doing your own first line editing.

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The craft of copy editing a dying art | Opinion | Macon.com

The craft of copy editing a dying art | Opinion | Macon.com | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

I find it odd to experience my obsolescence as it unfolds rather than after the fact.


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Very Cool: “Single Sentence Animations” Visualize the Short Stories of Contemporary Writers

Very Cool: “Single Sentence Animations” Visualize the Short Stories of Contemporary Writers | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Kindle, and ePub.  One clever way they promote short fiction is with a free, weekly single-story feature called “Recommended Reading.' And with the help of an animator and a musician, Electric Journal produces what it calls a “Single Sentence...

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O. Henry on the Secrets of Writing Short Stories: Rare Audio Recording

O. Henry on the Secrets of Writing Short Stories: Rare Audio Recording | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it
Today is the 150th anniversary of the birth of the short story writer O. Henry. He was born William Sydney Porter in Greensboro North Carolina on September 11, 1862, and his life was not easy. He chose the pen name 'O.

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cafonso's comment, September 15, 2012 11:14 AM
This is in the wrong been. It should be in The World of Open
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Why Stories Stick When Facts Fall Short

Why Stories Stick When Facts Fall Short | Emily's Senior Project | Scoop.it

How many of you can tell me what percentage of female high school students get pregnant each year? My guess is that most people don’t have that statistic readily available off the top of their head. But how many of you can tell me the story of a teen mom? Whether it’s the circumstances around her pregnancy, her name, where she’s from, or what happened to the child—the individual stories around an issue are often hard to forget.

 

That is the power of narrative. It can draw us in, prompt us to action, change our mindset and entertain us all at the same time. To harness the power of storytelling you need to find unique moments that can move your audience, combine them with the tools that can truly bring your message to life and you will ultimately generate action.


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