Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing
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How not to respond to reviewers: Eight simple tips

How not to respond to reviewers: Eight simple tips | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
My first attempt at publishing a paper was a breeze. A collaborator was asked to contribute to a special issue and offered me the opportunity to lead the paper. I was a PhD student at the time, and spent two months visiting her lab overseas and writing. By the end of my visit, I’d carved out a draft that I left behind for comments. After a bunch of emails and several rounds of revisions over the next month, we were ready to submit.


Via Jean-Michel Ané, Giannis Stringlis
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Keeping up with the literature: Your suggestions

Keeping up with the literature: Your suggestions | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it

Via Mary Williams
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Swinburne LAS Centre's curator insight, August 17, 9:58 PM
Great tips for alerts and consistent updates
ringacrux's comment, August 27, 1:01 AM

Its magnificent
doozyfunny's comment, September 1, 12:05 AM
Its superb
Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Digital Delights for Learners
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mysimpleshow - create your own explainer video in minutes

mysimpleshow - create your own explainer video in minutes | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
It has never been easier to create your own explainer video. mysimpleshow transforms any text into an animated video you will love.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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johanna krijnsen's curator insight, August 3, 5:57 AM
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Character Minutes's curator insight, August 3, 1:03 PM
Looks like a great way to encouraging students to be organized and think logically by building their own step-by-step instructions. 
Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Fungal Innate Immunity Induced by Bacterial Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs)

Fungal Innate Immunity Induced by Bacterial Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs) | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Plants and animals detect bacterial presence through Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs) which induce an innate immune response. The field of fungal–bacterial interaction at the molecular level is still in its infancy and little is known about MAMPs and their detection by fungi. Exposing Fusarium graminearum to bacterial MAMPs led to increased fungal membrane hyperpolarization, a putative defense response, and a range of transcriptional responses. The fungus reacted with a different transcript profile to each of the three tested MAMPs, although a core set of genes related to energy generation, transport, amino acid production, secondary metabolism, and especially iron uptake were detected for all three. Half of the genes related to iron uptake were predicted MirA type transporters that potentially take up bacterial siderophores. These quick responses can be viewed as a preparation for further interactions with beneficial or pathogenic bacteria, and constitute a fungal innate immune response with similarities to those of plants and animals.

Via Francis Martin, Christophe Jacquet
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Zhenchuan Ma's comment, June 2, 8:40 PM
Interesting work!
Jessie Uehling's curator insight, June 5, 8:12 PM
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Open-access journal eLife gets £25 million boost

Open-access journal eLife gets £25 million boost | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Biology's big funders announce investment will continue to 2022.
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No idea why Scoop.it chose an image of an ancient toilet to accompany this article, which is a fascinating look at the first years of eLife.
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Vermont v science

Vermont v science | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
The little state that could kneecap the biotech industry
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The Economist pulls no punches.
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Figshare launches 'academic Pinterest' - Research Information

Figshare launches 'academic Pinterest' - Research Information | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Writing workshop 2016

How to write scientific research articles- from structuring your paper to polishing it, ethical issues in writing and figure preparation, and peer review

Via Mary Williams
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I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

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Mary Williams's curator insight, March 10, 7:28 AM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

Guojian HU's curator insight, March 11, 2:45 AM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

Thirumurugan's curator insight, March 26, 5:05 AM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

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Paper that says human hand was 'designed by Creator' sparks concern

Paper that says human hand was 'designed by Creator' sparks concern | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Apparently creationist research prompts soul searching over process of editing and peer review.
Jennifer Mach's insight:
Another paper I wish had been well-edited: 
“Indeed, we are not native speakers of English, and entirely lost the connotations of some words such as ‘Creator’. I am so sorry for that.” 
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The manuscript-editing marketplace

The manuscript-editing marketplace | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
A peer-to-peer website aims to disrupt the author-services industry.
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Is scientific editing about to get Uber-ed? 
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Thirumurugan's curator insight, March 26, 5:21 AM
Is scientific editing about to get Uber-ed? 
Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Digital Delights for Learners
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Presentation Software - Zeetings

Presentation Software - Zeetings | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Presentation software that supports Q&A sessions, polling, slide sharing to mobile devices, audience data collection.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Dell Technical Support Phone Number 1 (800) 204-4427's curator insight, February 25, 4:48 AM

How to Set-up Your New #Dell Laptop? Call us 1 (800) 749-0917

1. Physical Set-up
2. Microsoft Windows Set-up
3. Create your Windows restore media
4. Update Windows
5. Update Drivers

Ask to Expert 1-800-749-0917 http://goo.gl/yUI3tx Your #Dell_laptop backed with #Window operating system that is the most crucial base of all #computer_programs to run
or perform various task.

elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, February 26, 6:01 AM

Pour sortir des classiques

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Happy birthday to us

Happy birthday to us | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Nature Plants has now completed a full year of publication as a journal aimed at all the plant sciences.
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Nature Plants looks back on their first year. 

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‘Kudos’ promises to help scientists promote their papers to new audiences

‘Kudos’ promises to help scientists promote their papers to new audiences | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Increasingly popular social-media tool says it can maximize reach and impact of research.
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Statistical relevance—relevant statistics, part II: presenting experimental data

Statistical relevance—relevant statistics, part II: presenting experimental data | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
In the first part of this article series, I discussed general guidelines for analyzing the results of scientific experiments (Klaus, 2015). The next step is the graphical representation of the results. The importance of data presentation should not be underestimated as figures are a key component of both data analysis and publications. Graphics are an important analytical tool as they can help to reveal patterns and illustrate differences. The appropriate plotting of data can also strengthen or even replace more formal statistical procedures, such as hypothesis tests. In the context of scientific publications, figures should guide the reader through the article and provide a clear and precise representation of the experimental results.

In this article, I will focus primarily on key principles and good practices for presenting small‐to‐medium datasets with the aim of comparing results from different experimental groups. As a general rule, authors should show as much of the actual data as possible instead of summarizing datasets via means or variances. Even larger datasets can be displayed efficiently using an appropriate plot; bars and boxes to visualize summary statistics can serve as additional visual guides. To adapt the methods described in this article, readers can download a supplementary “notebook” (see Code EV1) with code to generate the plots in the R language (R Core Team, 2015). Additionally, this web tool (http://embojserver.embl.de) generates the bee swarm plots and dot plots discussed later in the article. Apart from the topics discussed in this article, there are many more aspects that require attention. The “Scientific Figure Design Course” material by the Bioinformatics unit of the Babraham Institute (Babraham Bioinformatics, 2015) and the book by Tufte (1983) are valuable references.

I start with a discussion of displaying small‐scale experimental datasets. Let us assume that we have a fluorescent marker for detecting a recombination event in …
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plants and Microbes
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The Pub Club Hub: Perspectives from Sharon Long – a pioneer in plant science (2016)

The Pub Club Hub: Perspectives from Sharon Long – a pioneer in plant science (2016) | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it

Fred Ausubel’s talk was by far my favorite at the 2014 IS-MPMI Congress.  Not because the other talks were boring or bad, but because he told the story of his science in the context of history and the various members who did the work over the years.  He also shared the perspective from which the science was done. 

 

Sharon Long’s talk at the 2016 IS-MPMI Congress followed a similar approach, and left a similar impression.  I can begin to appreciate, when hearing these great pioneers of plant biology share their stories, how they must feel about us young folks with our kit-based, impact-factor driven mentalities.  Of course, I fully appreciate the different selective pressures that have shaped the current science culture, but hearing Sharon talk I really began to wonder if we bear more responsibility for our current dilemma than we want to admit? 

 

Sure, most of science is not the big discoveries, it is the mundane, every day drudgery of “no effect,” but this was true for them as well. Do we, in our efforts to claim one of those big results as our own, cut too many corners and miss them in the process?  Sharon described the process of discovering the signals responsible for nodulation in the plant-rhizobium interaction and emphasized that they looked in EVERY fraction of plant exudate, not only the ones they thought might contain the compound of interest.  She also encouraged us to never underestimate the need to just LOOK!

Sharon’s talk contained many other gems of wisdom for both new students and more seasoned scientists.  I have outlined a few main points below.  Also check out the Tweets on Storify, which captured the highlights more comprehensively than I could do alone!  As you read through, I encourage you to challenge yourself with her advice.  Do not just read it, think, “Wow, that sounds great!” and then stash it away.  Think about what she said, test the ideas to decide if they are sound, and then apply the ones you believe to be true.  You know, approach it like a scientist! 

 

Themes:

Use genetics for discovery as well as for analysisUse bacterial genetics as a probe of plant developmentPlants & microbes have been studying each other longer and so know each other better than we know themDraw from other systemsmany discoveries only happen with combined efforts of multiple labs working with different systems/approachesYou may study plant-microbe interactions, but developmental biology may inform your work – think outside the box

Sharon Long’s tips for conducting rigorous science:

Never underestimate the need to just Look!Your control is the most important part of your experiment – design it first.Don’t narrow down your options prematurely. Broaden your mind.Do blind experiments whenever possible to prevent bias from affecting your results.Use your Community Of Minds! (Sharon borrowed equipment from a neighboring lab to do electrophysiology of root hairs.)

To get out of the box:

Consider your unique background, your personal set of experiences and skills. What you have to offer is unique because of this.As professors, TEACH! You will gain unique insights.  Students always ask unexpected questions.

How to pick important experiments:

Can you turn it into a Yes/No question? Doing this gives you a testable hypothesisIf you knew the answer to the question, would it change what you did next? If not, maybe it isn’t the right question to be asking.Will knowing the answer change the way you and others think about the thing you are studying?

 


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from The science toolbox
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Scientists’ Reputations Are Based on Getting It Right, Not Being Right

Scientists’ Reputations Are Based on Getting It Right, Not Being Right | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
How are scientists evaluated? Members of the general public, undergraduate students, and active researchers all agree that the research process, not the results, determines a scientist’s reputation.

Via Niklaus Grunwald
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
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Using Twitter in science: advice for graduate students

Using Twitter in science: advice for graduate students | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
I recently gave a hands-on workshop to graduate students in our department about using Twitter in science. As part of that workshop, I provided some bullet points about this social media tool, and I thought it might be useful to share these perspectives more broadly!

Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Eight things I learnt from #tardigate

Eight things I learnt from #tardigate | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Tardigrades, endearing eight legged minibeasts related to insects and spiders and also known as water bears or moss piglets, are among my favourite animals. In late November 2015, a colleague, Bob …
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You could always email him. (Making suggestions sound nicer)

You could always email him. (Making suggestions sound nicer) | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
by Kate Woodford​ These two speakers are giving the same piece of advice to a friend. Compare the words that they use to make the suggestion: Speaker A: You should go to a different hairdresser. Speaker B: Have you thought of going to a different hairdresser? How does speaker A sound to you? Direct? Bossy? Perhaps…
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How to (seriously) read a scientific paper

How to (seriously) read a scientific paper | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
Reading becomes easier with experience, but it is up to each scientist to identify the techniques that work best for them.
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How to write titles that tempt

How to write titles that tempt | Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing | Scoop.it
a blog from the Genetics Society of America
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Great tips from Mark Johnston, the Editor in Chief of Genetics, on how to write titles that make the reader want more!
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Thirumurugan's curator insight, March 26, 5:21 AM
Great tips from Mark Johnston, the Editor in Chief of Genetics, on how to write titles that make the reader want more!
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When Is Science ‘Ultimately Unreliable’?

© 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved. When Is Science ‘Ultimately Unreliable’? This past October, I published an editorial (Blatt, 2015) appraising the social media phenomenon of PubPeer.
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The continuing debate on PubPeer.
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