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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plants and Microbes
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J Biomol NMR: Solution structure of the Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence protein AvrPiz-t (2013)

J Biomol NMR: Solution structure of the Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence protein AvrPiz-t (2013) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

The AvrPiz-t gene encodes a small protein predicted to be secreted that shows no homology to known proteins and is 108 amino acids in length. AvrPiz-t can suppress programmed cell death (PCD) induced by BAX in tobacco, suggesting that it might contribute to the pathogenicity of M. oryzae. These data suggested that AvrPiz-t functions primarily as a virulence effector contributing to the pathogenicity of M. oryzae. To further understand the mechanism of the pathogenicity-associated function of AvrPiz-t, we determined its solution structure.


Via Elsa Ballini, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
A science editor's take on what's new and interesting in the plant kingdom.
Curated by Jennifer Mach
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A Microbial Avenue to Cell Cycle Control in the Plant Superkingdom

A Microbial Avenue to Cell Cycle Control in the Plant Superkingdom | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Research in yeast and animals has resulted in a well-supported consensus model for eukaryotic cell cycle control. The fit of this model to early diverging eukaryotes, such as the plant kingdom, remains unclear. Using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed an efficient pipeline, incorporating robotics, semiautomated image analysis, and deep sequencing, to molecularly identify >50 genes, mostly conserved in higher plants, specifically required for cell division but not cell growth. Mutated genes include the cyclin-dependent kinases CDKA (resembling yeast and animal Cdk1) and the plant-specific CDKB. The C. reinhardtii cell cycle consists of a long G1 during which cells can grow >10-fold, followed by multiple rapid cycles of DNA replication and segregation. CDKA and CDKB execute nonoverlapping functions: CDKA promotes transition between G1 and entry into the division cycle, while CDKB is essential specifically for spindle formation and nuclear division, but not for DNA replication, once CDKA-dependent initiation has occurred. The anaphase-promoting complex is required for similar steps in the C. reinhardtii cell cycle as in Opisthokonts; however, the spindle assembly checkpoint, which targets the APC in Opisthokonts, appears severely attenuated in C. reinhardtii, based on analysis of mutants affecting microtubule function. This approach allows unbiased integration of the consensus cell cycle control model with innovations specific to the plant lineage.

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The ARC1 E3 Ligase Promotes a Strong and Stable Self-Incompatibility Response in Arabidopsis Species: Response to the Nasrallah and Nasrallah Commentary

The ARC1 E3 Ligase Promotes a Strong and Stable Self-Incompatibility Response in Arabidopsis Species: Response to the Nasrallah and Nasrallah Commentary | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Following the identification of the male (S-locus Cysteine Rich/S-locus Protein 11) and female (S Receptor kinase [SRK]) factors controlling self-incompatibility in the Brassicaceae, research in this field has focused on understanding the nature of the cellular responses activated by these regulators. We previously identified the ARM Repeat Containing1 (ARC1) E3 ligase as a component of the SRK signaling pathway and demonstrated ARC1’s requirement in the stigma for self-incompatible pollen rejection in Brassica napus, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we discuss our findings on the role of ARC1 in reconstructing a strong and stable A. thaliana self-incompatibility phenotype, in the context of the putative issues outlined in a commentary by Nasrallah and Nasrallah. Additionally, with their proposed standardized strategy for studying self-incompatibility in A. thaliana, we offer our perspective on what constitutes a strong and stable self-incompatibility phenotype in A. thaliana and how this should be investigated and reported to the greater community.

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Rice SPX1 and SPX2 inhibit phosphate starvation responses through interacting with PHR2 in a phosphate-dependent manner

Rice SPX1 and SPX2 inhibit phosphate starvation responses through interacting with PHR2 in a phosphate-dependent manner | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

In plants, sensing the levels of external and internal nutrients is essential for reprogramming the transcriptome and adapting to the fluctuating environment. Phosphate (Pi) is a key plant nutrient, and a large proportion of Pi starvation-responsive genes are under the control of PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PHR1) in Arabidopsis (AtPHR1) and its homologs, such as Oryza sativa (Os)PHR2 in rice. AtPHR1 andOsPHR2 expression is not very responsive to Pi starvation, raising the question as to how plants sense changes in cellular Pi levels to activate the central regulator. SPX [named after SYG1 (suppressor of yeast gpa1), Pho81 (CDK inhibitor in yeast PHO pathway), and XPR1 (xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor)] proteins that harbor only the SPX domain are reported to be involved in the negative regulation of Pi starvation responses. Here, we show that the nuclear localized SPX proteins SPX1 and SPX2 are Pi-dependent inhibitors of the activity of OsPHR2 in rice. Indeed, SPX1 and SPX2 proteins interact with PHR2 through their SPX domain, inhibiting its binding to P1BS (the PHR1-binding sequence: GNATATNC). In vivo data, as well as results from in vitro experiments using purified SPX1, SPX2, and OsPHR2 proteins, showed that SPX1 and SPX2 inhibition of OsPHR2 activity is Pi-dependent. These data provide evidence to support the involvement of SPX1 and SPX2 in the Pi-sensing mechanism in plants.

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Experimental approaches to study plant cell walls during plant-microbe interactions

Plant cell walls provide physical strength, regulate the passage of bio-molecules, and act as the first barrier of defense against biotic and abiotic stress. In addition to providing structural integrity, plant cell walls serve an important function in connecting cells to their extracellular environment by sensing and transducing signals to activate cellular responses, such as those that occur during pathogen infection. This mini review will summarize current experimental approaches used to study cell wall functions during plant-pathogen interactions. Focus will be paid to cell imaging, spectroscopic analyses, and metabolic profiling techniques.

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New insights into domestication of carrot from root transcriptome analyses

New insights into domestication of carrot from root transcriptome analyses | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Background

Understanding the molecular basis of domestication can provide insights into the processes of rapid evolution and crop improvement. Here we demonstrated the processes of carrot domestication and identified genes under selection based on transcriptome analyses.

Results

The root transcriptomes of widely differing cultivated and wild carrots were sequenced. A method accounting for sequencing errors was introduced to optimize SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovery. 11,369 SNPs were identified. Of these, 622 (out of 1000 tested SNPs) were validated and used to genotype a large set of cultivated carrot, wild carrot and other wild Daucus carota subspecies, primarily of European origin. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that eastern carrot may originate from Western Asia and western carrot may be selected from eastern carrot. Different wild D. carota subspecies may have contributed to the domestication of cultivated carrot. Genetic diversity was significantly reduced in western cultivars, probably through bottlenecks and selection. However, a high proportion of genetic diversity (more than 85% of the genetic diversity in wild populations) is currently retained in western cultivars. Model simulation indicated high and asymmetric gene flow from wild to cultivated carrots, spontaneously and/or by introgression breeding. Nevertheless, high genetic differentiation exists between cultivated and wild carrots (Fst =0.295) showing the strong effects of selection. Expression patterns differed radically for some genes between cultivated and wild carrot roots which may be related to changes in root traits. The up-regulation of water-channel-protein gene expression in cultivars might be involved in changing water content and transport in roots. The activated expression of carotenoid-binding-protein genes in cultivars could be related to the high carotenoid accumulation in roots. The silencing of allergen-protein-like genes in cultivated carrot roots suggested strong human selection to reduce allergy. These results suggest that regulatory changes of gene expressions may have played a predominant role in domestication.

Conclusions

Western carrots may originate from eastern carrots. The reduction in genetic diversity in western cultivars due to domestication bottleneck/selection may have been offset by introgression from wild carrot. Differential gene expression patterns between cultivated and wild carrot roots may be a signature of strong selection for favorable cultivation traits.

The complete article is available as a provisional P


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Intracellular catalytic domain of Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia

Intracellular catalytic domain of Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of Nod-factor signalling pathway is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonisation of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here we show that the intracellular kinase-domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd), but not its inactive or full length version, leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6 fold higher than rhizobia induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonisation of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in absence of rhizobia but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonisation.

Via Christophe Jacquet, Mary Williams
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Plant Nutrition: Root Transporters on the Move

Plant Nutrition: Root Transporters on the Move | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Nutrient and water uptake from the soil is essential for plant growth and development. In the root, absorption and radial transport of nutrients and water toward the vascular tissues is achieved by a battery of specialized transporters and channels. Modulating the amount and the localization of these membrane transport proteins appears as a way to drive their activity and is essential to maintain nutrient homeostasis in plants. This control first involves the delivery of newly synthesized proteins to the plasma membrane by establishing check points along the secretory pathway, especially during the export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Plasma membrane-localized transport proteins are internalized through endocytosis followed by recycling to the cell surface or targeting to the vacuole for degradation, hence constituting another layer of control. These intricate mechanisms are often regulated by nutrient availability, stresses, and endogenous cues, allowing plants to rapidly adjust to their environment and adapt their development.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Nature Communications: Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection (2014)

Nature Communications: Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection (2014) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

To cause plant disease, pathogenic fungi can secrete effector proteins into plant cells to suppress plant immunity and facilitate fungal infection. Most fungal pathogens infect plants using very long strand-like cells, called hyphae, that secrete effectors from their tips into host tissue. How fungi undergo long-distance cell signalling to regulate effector production during infection is not known. Here we show that long-distance retrograde motility of early endosomes (EEs) is necessary to trigger transcription of effector-encoding genes during plant infection by the pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. We demonstrate that motor-dependent retrograde EE motility is necessary for regulation of effector production and secretion during host cell invasion. We further show that retrograde signalling involves the mitogen-activated kinase Crk1 that travels on EEs and participates in control of effector production. Fungal pathogens therefore undergo long-range signalling to orchestrate host invasion.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Origin and Development of the Root Cap in Rice

Origin and Development of the Root Cap in Rice | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

The tip of the root is covered by a thimble-shaped root cap that is the site of perception and transduction for many environmental stimuli. Until now, little was known about how the root cap of rice (Oryza sativa) develops and functions to regulate the adaptive behavior of the root. To address this, we examined the formation of the rice root cap during embryogenesis and characterized the anatomy and structure of the rice radicle root cap. We further investigated the role of the quiescent center in the de novo origin of the root cap. At the molecular level, we found that shoot-derived auxin was absolutely needed to trigger root cap regeneration when the quiescent center was removed. Our time-course analysis of transcriptomic dynamics during the early phases of root cap regeneration indicated that changes in auxin signaling and appropriate levels of cytokinin are critical for root cap regeneration after the removal of the root cap. Moreover, we identified 152 genes that produce root cap-specific transcripts in the rice root tip. These findings together offer, to our knowledge, new mechanistic insights into the cellular and molecular events inherent in the formation and development of the root cap in rice and provide a basis for future research on the developmental and physiological function of the root cap of monocot crops.

 

 


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Plant Journal: Probing formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells using a pathogen effector (2014)

Plant Journal: Probing formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells using a pathogen effector (2014) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Importin-αs are essential adapter proteins that recruit cytoplasmic proteins destined for active nuclear import to the nuclear transport machinery. Cargo proteins interact with the importin-α armadillo repeat domain via nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), short amino acids motifs enriched in Lys and Arg residues. Plant genomes typically encode several importin-α paralogs that can have both specific and partially redundant functions. Although some cargos are preferentially imported by a distinct importin-α, it remains unknown how this specificity is generated and to what extent cargos compete for binding to nuclear transport receptors. Here we report that the effector protein HaRxL106 from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis co-opts the host cell's nuclear import machinery. We use HaRxL106 as a probe to determine redundant and specific functions of importin-α paralogs from Arabidopsis thaliana. A crystal structure of the importin-α3/MOS6 armadillo repeat domain suggests that five of the six Arabidopsis importin-αs expressed in rosette leaves have an almost identical NLS binding site. Comparison of the importin-α binding affinities of HaRxL106 and other cargos in vitro and in plant cells suggests that relatively small affinity differences in vitro affect the rate of transport complex formation in vivo. Our results suggest that cargo affinity for importin-α, sequence variation at the importin-α NLS binding sites and tissue-specific expression levels of importin-αs determine formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells.


Via The Sainsbury Lab, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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The Sainsbury Lab's curator insight, October 7, 4:34 AM

Importin-αs are essential adapter proteins that recruit cytoplasmic proteins destined for active nuclear import to the nuclear transport machinery. Cargo proteins interact with the importin-α armadillo repeat domain via nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), short amino acids motifs enriched in Lys and Arg residues. Plant genomes typically encode several importin-α paralogs that can have both specific and partially redundant functions. Although some cargos are preferentially imported by a distinct importin-α, it remains unknown how this specificity is generated and to what extent cargos compete for binding to nuclear transport receptors. Here we report that the effector protein HaRxL106 from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis co-opts the host cell's nuclear import machinery. We use HaRxL106 as a probe to determine redundant and specific functions of importin-α paralogs from Arabidopsis thaliana. A crystal structure of the importin-α3/MOS6 armadillo repeat domain suggests that five of the six Arabidopsis importin-αs expressed in rosette leaves have an almost identical NLS binding site. Comparison of the importin-α binding affinities of HaRxL106 and other cargos in vitro and in plant cells suggests that relatively small affinity differences in vitro affect the rate of transport complex formation in vivo. Our results suggest that cargo affinity for importin-α, sequence variation at the importin-α NLS binding sites and tissue-specific expression levels of importin-αs determine formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells.

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PLOS Pathogens: Adaptive Prediction As a Strategy in Microbial Infections (2014)

PLOS Pathogens: Adaptive Prediction As a Strategy in Microbial Infections (2014) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Microorganisms need to sense and respond to constantly changing microenvironments, and adapt their transcriptome, proteome, and metabolism accordingly to survive [1]. However, microbes sometimes react in a way which does not make immediate biological sense in light of the current environment—for example, by up-regulating an iron acquisition system in times of metal abundance. The reason for this seemingly nonsensical behavior can lie in the microbe's ability to predict a coming change in conditions by cues from the current environment. If the microbe (pre-)adapts accordingly, it will increase its fitness and chances of survival under subsequent selection pressures—a concept known as adaptive prediction.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Arabidopsis DE-ETIOLATED1 Represses Photomorphogenesis by Positively Regulating Phytochrome-Interacting Factors in the Dark

Arabidopsis DE-ETIOLATED1 Represses Photomorphogenesis by Positively Regulating Phytochrome-Interacting Factors in the Dark | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings undergo photomorphogenic development even in darkness when the function of DE-ETIOLATED1 (DET1), a repressor of photomorphogenesis, is disrupted. However, the mechanism by which DET1 represses photomorphogenesis remains unclear. Our results indicate that DET1 directly interacts with a group of transcription factors known as the phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs). Furthermore, our results suggest that DET1 positively regulates PIF protein levels primarily by stabilizing PIF proteins in the dark. Genetic analysis showed that each pif single mutant could enhance the det1-1 phenotype, and ectopic expression of each PIF in det1-1 partially suppressed the det1-1phenotype, based on hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon opening angles observed in darkness. Genomic analysis also revealed that DET1 may modulate the expression of light-regulated genes to mediate photomorphogenesis partially through PIFs. The observed interaction and regulation between DET1 and PIFs not only reveal how DET1 represses photomorphogenesis, but also suggest a possible mechanism by which two groups of photomorphogenic repressors, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS/DET/FUSCA and PIFs, work in concert to repress photomorphogenesis in darkness.

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Silencing the mob: disrupting quorum sensing as a means to fight plant disease

Silencing the mob: disrupting quorum sensing as a means to fight plant disease | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Bacteria are able to sense their population's density through a cell–cell communication system, termed ‘quorum sensing’ (QS). This system regulates gene expression in response to cell density through the constant production and detection of signalling molecules. These molecules commonly act as auto-inducers through the up-regulation of their own synthesis. Many pathogenic bacteria, including those of plants, rely on this communication system for infection of their hosts. The finding that the countering of QS-disrupting mechanisms exists in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms offers a promising novel method to fight disease. During the last decade, several approaches have been proposed to disrupt QS pathways of phytopathogens, and hence to reduce their virulence. Such studies have had varied success in vivo, but most lend promising support to the idea that QS manipulation could be a potentially effective method to reduce bacterial-mediated plant disease. This review discusses the various QS-disrupting mechanisms found in both bacteria and plants, as well as the different approaches applied artificially to interfere with QS pathways and thus protect plant health.

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Robust Self-Incompatibility in the Absence of a Functional ARC1 Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Commentary by J. and M. Nasrallah)

Robust Self-Incompatibility in the Absence of a Functional ARC1 Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Commentary by J. and M. Nasrallah) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Self-incompatibility (SI) is the primary determinant of the outbreeding mode of sexual reproduction in the Brassicaceae. All Arabidopsis thaliana accessions analyzed to date carry mutations that disrupt SI functions by inactivating the SI specificity-determining S locus or SI modifier loci. S-locus genes isolated from self-incompatible close relatives of A. thaliana restore robust SI in several accessions that harbor only S-locus mutations and confer transient SI in accessions that additionally harbor mutations at modifier loci. Self-incompatible transgenic A. thaliana plants have proved to be valuable for analysis of the recognition and signaling events that underlie SI in the Brassicaceae. Here, we review results demonstrating that S-locus genes are necessary and sufficient for SI signaling and for restoration of a strong and developmentally stable SI phenotype in several accessions of A. thaliana. The data indicate that introduction of a functional E3 ligase-encoding ARC1 gene, which is deleted in all accessions that have been analyzed to date, is not required for SI signaling leading to inhibition of self pollen or for reversion of A. thaliana to its fully self-incompatible ancestral state.

Jennifer Mach's insight:

See also response to commentary, http://sco.lt/7ulY8n

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OSCA1 mediates osmotic-stress-evoked Ca2+ increases vital for osmosensing in Arabidopsis

OSCA1 mediates osmotic-stress-evoked Ca2+ increases vital for osmosensing in Arabidopsis | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Water is crucial to plant growth and development. Environmental water deficiency triggers an osmotic stress signalling cascade, which induces short-term cellular responses to reduce water loss and long-term responses to remodel the transcriptional network and physiological and developmental processes1, 2, 3, 4. Several signalling components that have been identified by extensive genetic screens for altered sensitivities to osmotic stress seem to function downstream of the perception of osmotic stress. It is known that hyperosmolality and various other stimuli trigger increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i)5, 6. Considering that in bacteria and animals osmosensing Ca2+channels serve as osmosensors7, 8, hyperosmolality-induced [Ca2+]i increases have been widely speculated to be involved in osmosensing in plants1, 9. However, the molecular nature of corresponding Ca2+ channels remain unclear6, 10, 11. Here we describe a hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channel and its function in osmosensing in plants. Using calcium-imaging-based unbiased forward genetic screens we isolatedArabidopsis mutants that exhibit low hyperosmolality-induced [Ca2+]i increases. These mutants were rescreened for their cellular, physiological and developmental responses to osmotic stress, and those with clear combined phenotypes were selected for further physical mapping. One of the mutants, reduced hyperosmolality-induced [Ca2+]i increase 1(osca1), displays impaired osmotic Ca2+ signalling in guard cells and root cells, and attenuated water transpiration regulation and root growth in response to osmotic stress. OSCA1 is identified as a previously unknown plasma membrane protein and forms hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channels, revealing that OSCA1 may be an osmosensor. OSCA1 represents a channel responsible for [Ca2+]i increases induced by a stimulus in plants, opening up new avenues for studying Ca2+ machineries for other stimuli and providing potential molecular genetic targets for engineering drought-resistant crops.

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Andres Zurita's curator insight, October 16, 5:16 PM

The osmosensing mechanism in plants finally found?

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SPX1 is a phosphate-dependent inhibitor of PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE 1 in Arabidopsis

SPX1 is a phosphate-dependent inhibitor of PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE 1 in Arabidopsis | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

To cope with growth in low-phosphate (Pi) soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses that involve both developmental and metabolic changes. PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE 1 (PHR1) and related transcription factors play a central role in the control of Pi starvation responses (PSRs). How Pi levels control PHR1 activity, and thus PSRs, remains to be elucidated. Here, we identify a direct Pi-dependent inhibitor of PHR1 in Arabidopsis, SPX1, a nuclear protein that shares the SPX domain with yeast Pi sensors and with several Pi starvation signaling proteins from plants. Double mutation of SPX1 and of a related gene, SPX2,resulted in molecular and physiological changes indicative of increased PHR1 activity in plants grown in Pi-sufficient conditions or after Pi refeeding of Pi-starved plants but had only a limited effect on PHR1 activity in Pi-starved plants. These data indicate that SPX1 and SPX2 have a cellular Pi-dependent inhibitory effect on PHR1. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the SPX1/PHR1 interaction in planta is highly Pi-dependent. DNA-binding and pull-down assays with bacterially expressed, affinity-purified tagged SPX1 and ΔPHR1 proteins showed that SPX1 is a competitive inhibitor of PHR1 binding to its recognition sequence, and that its efficiency is highly dependent on the presence of Pi or phosphite, a nonmetabolizable Pi analog that can repress PSRs. The relative strength of the SPX1/PHR1 interaction is thus directly influenced by Pi, providing a link between Pi perception and signaling.

Jennifer Mach's insight:

One of a pair of PNAS phosphate papers.

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De novo assembly of soybean wild relatives for pan-genome analysis of diversity and agronomic traits

De novo assembly of soybean wild relatives for pan-genome analysis of diversity and agronomic traits | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Wild relatives of crops are an important source of genetic diversity for agriculture, but their gene repertoire remains largely unexplored. We report the establishment and analysis of a pan-genome of Glycine soja, the wild relative of cultivated soybean Glycine max, by sequencing and de novoassembly of seven phylogenetically and geographically representative accessions. Intergenomic comparisons identified lineage-specific genes and genes with copy number variation or large-effect mutations, some of which show evidence of positive selection and may contribute to variation of agronomic traits such as biotic resistance, seed composition, flowering and maturity time, organ size and final biomass. Approximately 80% of the pan-genome was present in all seven accessions (core), whereas the rest was dispensable and exhibited greater variation than the core genome, perhaps reflecting a role in adaptation to diverse environments. This work will facilitate the harnessing of untapped genetic diversity from wild soybean for enhancement of elite cultivars.


Via Andres Zurita
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Andres Zurita's curator insight, October 13, 4:29 PM

Wild relatives of crops are an important source of genetic diversity for agriculture, but their gene repertoire remains largely unexplored. We report the establishment and analysis of a pan-genome of Glycine soja, the wild relative of cultivated soybean Glycine max, by sequencing and de novoassembly of seven phylogenetically and geographically representative accessions. Intergenomic comparisons identified lineage-specific genes and genes with copy number variation or large-effect mutations, some of which show evidence of positive selection and may contribute to variation of agronomic traits such as biotic resistance, seed composition, flowering and maturity time, organ size and final biomass. Approximately 80% of the pan-genome was present in all seven accessions (core), whereas the rest was dispensable and exhibited greater variation than the core genome, perhaps reflecting a role in adaptation to diverse environments. This work will facilitate the harnessing of untapped genetic diversity from wild soybean for enhancement of elite cultivars.

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OsAUX1 controls lateral root initiation in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

OsAUX1 controls lateral root initiation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Polar auxin transport, mediated by influx and efflux transporters, controls many aspects of plant growth and development. The auxin influx carriers in Arabidopsis have been shown to control lateral root development and gravitropism, but little is known about these proteins in rice. This paper reports on the functional characterization of OsAUX1. Three OsAUX1 T-DNA insertion mutants and RNAi knockdown transgenic plants reduced lateral root initiation compared to WT plants. OsAUX1 overexpression plants exhibited increased lateral root initiation and OsAUX1 was highly expressed in lateral roots and lateral root primordia. Similarly, the auxin reporter, DR5-GUS, was expressed at lower levels in osaux1 than in the WT plants, which indicated that the auxin levels in the mutant roots had decreased. Exogenous NAA treatment rescued the defective phenotype in osaux1-1 plants, whereas IAA and 2,4-D could not, which suggested that OsAUX1 was a putative auxin influx carrier. The transcript levels of several auxin-signaling genes and cell cycle genes significantly declined in osaux1, hinting that the regulatory role of OsAUX1 may be mediated by auxin-signaling and cell cycle genes. Overall, our results indicated that OsAUX1 was involved in polar auxin transport and functioned to control auxin-mediated lateral root initiation in rice.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Nutrient transfer in plant–fungal symbioses

Nutrient transfer in plant–fungal symbioses | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Almost all plant species form symbioses with soil fungi, and nutrient transfer to plants is largely mediated through this partnership. Studies of fungal nutrient transfer to plants have largely focused on the transfer of limiting soil nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous, by mycorrhizal fungi. However, certain fungal endophytes, such as Metarhizium and Beauveria, are also able to transfer nitrogen to their plant hosts. Here, we review recent studies that have identified genes and their encoded transporters involved in the movement of nitrogen, phosphorous, and nonlimiting soil nutrients between symbionts. These recent advances in our understanding could lead to applications in agricultural and horticultural settings, and to the development of model fungal systems that could further elucidate the role of fungi in these symbioses.

  


Via Francis Martin, Jean-Michel Ané
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Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found inMicromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. Expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant roots and rhizosphere
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Focus on Roots

Focus on Roots | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

It is common for plant biologists to point out the importance of the neglected, hidden segment of plants that are their roots. It is striking to contemplate how much a better understanding of roots could contribute to the challenges facing agriculture today, namely a better use of fertilizer and water, as well as sustained productivity under various abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Yet, going through the pages of this Focus Issue dedicated entirely to roots, one becomes acutely aware of the formidable challenges that researchers are facing when tackling this plant organ, and one is reminded of all the good reasons not to work on this part of the plant. The nature of roots is to bury themselves into the soil and to enter into most intimate contact with their substrate, such that it is very hard to observe their growth and development, much less to extract them from the soil intact. Moreover, the soil is a substrate of mind-boggling heterogeneity and complexity, its complicated chemical and physical structure being potentiated by the biological diversity in the form of microbial communities. Luckily, an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying root growth and development can be obtained in the beautifully simple, controlled, and protected system of agar-grown, young Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Although highly artificial, this system has proven extremely amenable to analysis, and the Arabidopsis root meristem is arguably better studied and understood than most aerial plant organs, providing an invaluable basis for colleagues taking up the challenge of working on root systems of crop plants under more natural conditions. The Roots Focus Issue is a great illustration of this creative arc in current root research, spanning from work on model experimental systems such as Arabidopsis, to crops, and even to trees....


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant roots and rhizosphere
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The Optimal Lateral Root Branching Density for Maize Depends on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availability

The Optimal Lateral Root Branching Density for Maize Depends on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availability | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Observed phenotypic variation in the lateral root branching density (LRBD) in maize (Zea mays) is large (1–41 cm−1 major axis [i.e. brace, crown, seminal, and primary roots]), suggesting that LRBD has varying utility and tradeoffs in specific environments. Using the functional-structural plant model SimRoot, we simulated the three-dimensional development of maize root architectures with varying LRBD and quantified nitrate and phosphorus uptake, root competition, and whole-plant carbon balances in soils varying in the availability of these nutrients. Sparsely spaced (less than 7 branches cm−1), long laterals were optimal for nitrate acquisition, while densely spaced (more than 9 branches cm−1), short laterals were optimal for phosphorus acquisition. The nitrate results are mostly explained by the strong competition between lateral roots for nitrate, which causes increasing LRBD to decrease the uptake per unit root length, while the carbon budgets of the plant do not permit greater total root length (i.e. individual roots in the high-LRBD plants stay shorter). Competition and carbon limitations for growth play less of a role for phosphorus uptake, and consequently increasing LRBD results in greater root length and uptake. We conclude that the optimal LRBD depends on the relative availability of nitrate (a mobile soil resource) and phosphorus (an immobile soil resource) and is greater in environments with greater carbon fixation. The median LRBD reported in several field screens was 6 branches cm−1, suggesting that most genotypes have an LRBD that balances the acquisition of both nutrients. LRBD merits additional investigation as a potential breeding target for greater nutrient acquisition.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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A Proteomic Strategy for Global Analysis of Plant Protein Complexes

A Proteomic Strategy for Global Analysis of Plant Protein Complexes | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Global analyses of protein complex assembly, composition, and location are needed to fully understand how cells coordinate diverse metabolic, mechanical, and developmental activities. The most common methods for proteome-wide analysis of protein complexes rely on affinity purification-mass spectrometry or yeast two-hybrid approaches. These methods are time consuming and are not suitable for many plant species that are refractory to transformation or genome-wide cloning of open reading frames. Here, we describe the proof of concept for a method allowing simultaneous global analysis of endogenous protein complexes that begins with intact leaves and combines chromatographic separation of extracts from subcellular fractions with quantitative label-free protein abundance profiling by liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to the crude cytosolic fraction of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using size exclusion chromatography, we identified hundreds of cytosolic proteins that appeared to exist as components of stable protein complexes. The reliability of the method was validated by protein immunoblot analysis and comparisons with published size exclusion chromatography data and the masses of known complexes. The method can be implemented with appropriate instrumentation, is applicable to any biological system, and has the potential to be further developed to characterize the composition of protein complexes and measure the dynamics of protein complex localization and assembly under different conditions.

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Two Arabidopsis proteins synthesize acetylated xylan in vitro

Two Arabidopsis proteins synthesize acetylated xylan in vitro | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Xylan is the third most abundant glycopolymer on earth after cellulose and chitin. As a major component of wood, grain and forage, this natural biopolymer has far-reaching impacts on human life. This highly acetylated cell wall polysaccharide is a vital component of the plant cell wall, which functions as a molecular scaffold, providing plants with mechanical strength and flexibility. Mutations that impair synthesis of the xylan backbone give rise to plants that fail to grow normally because of collapsed xylem cells in the vascular system. Phenotypic analysis of these mutants has implicated many proteins in xylan biosynthesis; however, the enzymes directly responsible for elongation and acetylation of the xylan backbone have not been unambiguously identified. Here we provide direct biochemical evidence that two Arabidopsis thaliana proteins, IRREGULAR XYLEM 10–L (IRX10-L) and ESKIMO1/TRICOME BIREFRINGENCE 29 (ESK1/TBL29), catalyze these respective processes in vitro. By identifying the elusive xylan synthase and establishing ESK1/TBL29 as the archetypal plant polysaccharide O-acetyltransferase, we have resolved two long-standing questions in plant cell wall biochemistry. These findings shed light on integral steps in the molecular pathways used by plants to synthesize a major component of the world's biomass and expand our toolkit for producing glycopolymers with valuable properties.

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Resolving Distinct Genetic Regulators of Tomato Leaf Shape within a Heteroblastic and Ontogenetic Context

Resolving Distinct Genetic Regulators of Tomato Leaf Shape within a Heteroblastic and Ontogenetic Context | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Leaf shape is mutable, changing in ways modulated by both development and environment within genotypes. A complete model of leaf phenotype would incorporate the changes in leaf shape during juvenile-to-adult phase transitions and the ontogeny of each leaf. Here, we provide a morphometric description of >33,000 leaflets from a set of tomato (Solanum spp) introgression lines grown under controlled environment conditions. We first compare the shape of these leaves, arising during vegetative development, with >11,000 previously published leaflets from a field setting and >11,000 leaflets from wild tomato relatives. We then quantify the changes in shape, across ontogeny, for successive leaves in the heteroblastic series. Using principal component analysis, we then separate genetic effects modulating (1) the overall shape of all leaves versus (2) the shape of specific leaves in the series, finding the former more heritable than the latter and comparing quantitative trait loci regulating each. Our results demonstrate that phenotype is highly contextual and that unbiased assessments of phenotype, for quantitative genetic or other purposes, would ideally sample the many developmental and environmental factors that modulate it.

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