Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
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Genetically engineered tomatoes decrease plaque build-up in mice

Genetically engineered tomatoes decrease plaque build-up in mice | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Researchers have genetically engineered tomato plants to produce a peptide that mimics the actions of good cholesterol when eaten.

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Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
A science editor's take on what's new and interesting in the plant kingdom.
Curated by Jennifer Mach
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plants & Evolution
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Gene fractionation and function in the ancient subgenomes of maize

The maize genome experienced an ancient whole genome duplication approximately 10 million years ago and the duplicate subgenomes have since experienced reciprocal gene loss (fractionation) such that many genes have returned to single-copy status. This process has not affected the subgenomes equally; reduced gene expression in one of the subgenomes mitigates the consequences of mutations and gene deletions and is thought to drive higher rates of fractionation. Here we take advantage of published genome-wide SNP and phenotype association data to show that, in accordance with predictions of this model, paralogs with greater expression contribute more to phenotypic variation compared to their lowly expressed counterparts. Furthermore, paralogous genes in the least-fractionated subgenome account for a greater degree of phenotypic diversity than those resident on the more-fractionated subgenome. Intriguingly, analysis of singleton genes reveals this difference persists even after fractionation is complete. Additionally, we show that the two subgenomes of maize may differ in their epigenetic profiles.

Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
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Transcriptional integration of paternal and maternal factors in the Arabidopsis zygote

Transcriptional integration of paternal and maternal factors in the Arabidopsis zygote | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

In many plants, the asymmetric division of the zygote sets up the apical–basal axis of the embryo. Unlike animals, plant zygotes are transcriptionally active, implying that plants have evolved specific mechanisms to control transcriptional activation of patterning genes in the zygote. In Arabidopsis, two pathways have been found to regulate zygote asymmetry: YODA (YDA) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which is potentiated by sperm-delivered mRNA of the SHORT SUSPENSOR (SSP) membrane protein, and up-regulation of the patterning gene WOX8 by the WRKY2 transcription factor. How SSP/YDA signaling is transduced into the nucleus and how these pathways are integrated have remained elusive. Here we show that paternal SSP/YDA signaling directly phosphorylates WRKY2, which in turn leads to the up-regulation of WOX8 transcription in the zygote. We further discovered the transcription factors HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11/12 (HDG11/12) as maternal regulators of zygote asymmetry that also directly regulate WOX8 transcription. Our results reveal a framework of how maternal and paternal factors are integrated in the zygote to regulate embryo patterning.

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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from The Plant Cell
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A Global Co-expression Network Approach for Connecting Genes to Specialized Metabolic Pathways in Plants

A Global Co-expression Network Approach for Connecting Genes to Specialized Metabolic Pathways in Plants | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

A Global Co-expression Network Approach for Connecting Genes to Specialized Metabolic Pathways in Plants

Jennifer H. Wisecaver, Alexander T. Borowsky, Vered Tzin, Georg Jander, Daniel J. Kliebenstein, and Antonis Rokas

Plant Cell 2017 tpc.17.00009; Advance Publication April 13, 2017; doi:10.1105/tpc.17.00009


Via Mary Williams
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Plant cysteine oxidases are dioxygenases that directly enable arginyl transferase-catalysed arginylation of N-end rule targets

Plant cysteine oxidases are dioxygenases that directly enable arginyl transferase-catalysed arginylation of N-end rule targets | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Crop yield loss due to flooding is a threat to food security. Submergence-induced hypoxia in plants results in stabilization of group VII ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERF-VIIs), which aid survival under these adverse conditions. ERF-VII stability is controlled by the N-end rule pathway, which proposes that ERF-VII N-terminal cysteine oxidation in normoxia enables arginylation followed by proteasomal degradation. The PLANT CYSTEINE OXIDASEs (PCOs) have been identified as catalysts of this oxidation. ERF-VII stabilization in hypoxia presumably arises from reduced PCO activity. We directly demonstrate that PCO dioxygenase activity produces Cys-sulfinic acid at the N terminus of an ERF-VII peptide, which then undergoes efficient arginylation by an arginyl transferase (ATE1). This provides molecular evidence of N-terminal Cys-sulfinic acid formation and arginylation by N-end rule pathway components, and a substrate of ATE1 in plants. The PCOs and ATE1 may be viable intervention targets to stabilize N-end rule substrates, including ERF-VIIs, to enhance submergence tolerance in agriculture.

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Developmental patterning of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer in Arabidopsis seeds

Developmental patterning of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer in Arabidopsis seeds | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Angiosperm seed development is a paradigm of tissue cross-talk. Proper seed formation requires spatial and temporal coordination of the fertilization products – embryo and endosperm – and the surrounding seed coat maternal tissue. In early Arabidopsis seed development, all seed integuments were thought to respond homogenously to endosperm growth. Here, we show that the sub-epidermal integument cell layer has a unique developmental program. We characterized the cell patterning of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer, which initiates a previously uncharacterized extra cell layer, and identified TRANSPARENT TESTA 16 and SEEDSTICK MADS box transcription factors as master regulators of its polar development and cell architecture. Our data indicate that the differentiation of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer is insensitive to endosperm growth alone and to the repressive mechanism established by FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM and MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 Polycomb group proteins. This work demonstrates the different responses of epidermal and sub-epidermal integument cell layers to fertilization.
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PIF4-controlled auxin pathway contributes to hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis thaliana

PIF4-controlled auxin pathway contributes to hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis thaliana | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

F1 hybrids in Arabidopsis and crop species are uniform and high yielding. The F2 generation loses much of the yield advantage and the plants have heterogeneous phenotypes. We generated pure breeding hybrid mimic lines by recurrent selection and also selected a pure breeding small phenotype line. The hybrid mimics are almost completely homozygous with chromosome segments from each parent. Four particular chromosomal segments from C24 and 8 from Ler were present in all of the hybrid mimic lines, whereas in the F6 small phenotype line, the 12 segments were each derived from the alternative parent. Loci critical for promoting hybrid vigor may be contained in each of these 12 conserved segments. We have identified genes with similar altered expression in hybrid mimics and F1 plants but not in the small phenotype line. These genes may be critical for the generation of hybrid vigor. Analysis of transcriptomes indicated that increased expression of the transcription factor PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF4) may contribute to hybrid vigor by targeting the auxin biosynthesis gene YUCCA8 and the auxin signaling gene IAA29. A number of auxin responsive genes promoting leaf growth were up-regulated in the F1 hybrids and hybrid mimics, suggesting that increased auxin biosynthesis and signaling contribute to the hybrid phenotype. The hybrid mimic seeds had earlier germination as did the seeds of the F1 hybrids, indicating cosegregation of the genes for rosette size and the germination trait. Early germination may be an indicator of vigorous hybrids.

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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant pathogenic fungi
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LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell

LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Pathogens secrete effector proteins and many operate inside plant cells to enable infection. Some effectors have been found to enter subcellular compartments by mimicking host targeting sequences. Although many computational methods exist to predict plant protein subcellular localization, they perform poorly for effectors. The authors have developed LOCALIZER for predicting plant and effector protein localization to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. LOCALIZER shows greater prediction accuracy for chloroplast and mitochondrial targeting compared to other methods for 652 plant proteins. For 107 eukaryotic effectors, LOCALIZER outperforms other methods and predicts a previously unrecognized chloroplast transit peptide for the ToxA effector, which the authors show translocates into tobacco chloroplasts. Secretome-wide predictions and confocal microscopy reveal that rust fungi might have evolved multiple effectors that target chloroplasts or nuclei. LOCALIZER is the first method for predicting effector localisation in plants and is a valuable tool for prioritizing effector candidates for functional investigations. LOCALIZER is available at http://localizer.csiro.au/.


Via Norwich Rust Group, Steve Marek
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from The Plant Cell
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IN BRIEF: Chasing Scattered Genes: Identifying Specialized Metabolite Pathway Genes through Global Co-expression Analysis

IN BRIEF: Chasing Scattered Genes: Identifying Specialized Metabolite Pathway Genes through Global Co-expression Analysis | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Chasing Scattered Genes: Identifying Specialized Metabolite Pathway Genes through Global Co-expression Analysis

Jennifer A Lockhart

Plant Cell 2017 tpc.17.00303; Advance Publication April 13, 2017; doi:10.1105/tpc.17.00303 OPEN


Via Mary Williams
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Frontiers | Arsenic Transport in Rice and Biological Solutions to Reduce Arsenic Risk from Rice | Plant Traffic and Transport

Frontiers | Arsenic Transport in Rice and Biological Solutions to Reduce Arsenic Risk from Rice | Plant Traffic and Transport | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Rice (Oryza sativa L.) feeds ~3 billion people. Due to the wide occurrence of arsenic (As) pollution in paddy soils and its efficient plant uptake, As in rice grains presents health risks. Genetic manipulation may offer an effective approach to reduce As accumulation in rice grains. The genetics of As uptake and metabolism have been elucidated and target genes have been identified for genetic engineering to reduce As accumulation in grains. Key processes controlling As in grains include As uptake, arsenite (AsIII) efflux, arsenate (AsV) reduction and AsIII sequestration, and As methylation and volatilization. Recent advances, including characterization of AsV uptake transporter OsPT8, AsV reductase OsHAC1;1 and OsHAC1;2, rice glutaredoxins, and rice ABC transporter OsABCC1, make many possibilities to develop low-arsenic rice.
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Live Confocal Imaging of Developing Arabidopsis Flowers | Protocol

Live Confocal Imaging of Developing Arabidopsis Flowers | Protocol | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Live confocal imaging provides biologists with a powerful tool to study development. Here, we present a detailed protocol for th
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plants and Microbes
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PNAS: Live imaging of root–bacteria interactions in a microfluidics setup (2017)

PNAS: Live imaging of root–bacteria interactions in a microfluidics setup (2017) | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Plant roots play a dominant role in shaping the rhizosphere, the environment in which interaction with diverse microorganisms occurs. Tracking the dynamics of root–microbe interactions at high spatial resolution is currently limited because of methodological intricacy. Here, we describe a microfluidics-based approach enabling direct imaging of root–bacteria interactions in real time. The microfluidic device, which we termed tracking root interactions system (TRIS), consists of nine independent chambers that can be monitored in parallel. The principal assay reported here monitors behavior of fluorescently labeled Bacillus subtilis as it colonizes the root of Arabidopsis thaliana within the TRIS device. Our results show a distinct chemotactic behavior of B. subtilis toward a particular root segment, which we identify as the root elongation zone, followed by rapid colonization of that same segment over the first 6 h of root–bacteria interaction. Using dual inoculation experiments, we further show active exclusion of Escherichia coli cells from the root surface after B. subtilis colonization, suggesting a possible protection mechanism against root pathogens. Furthermore, we assembled a double-channel TRIS device that allows simultaneous tracking of two root systems in one chamber and performed real-time monitoring of bacterial preference between WT and mutant root genotypes. Thus, the TRIS microfluidics device provides unique insights into the microscale microbial ecology of the complex root microenvironment and is, therefore, likely to enhance the current rate of discoveries in this momentous field of research.


Via Christophe Jacquet, IPM Lab, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Frontiers | Reconsideration of Plant Morphological Traits: From a Structure-Based Perspective to a Function-Based Evolutionary Perspective | Plant Evolution and Development

Frontiers | Reconsideration of Plant Morphological Traits: From a Structure-Based Perspective to a Function-Based Evolutionary Perspective | Plant Evolution and Development | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
This opinion article proposes a novel alignment of traits in plant morphogenesis from a function-based evolutionary perspective. As a member species of the ecosystem on Earth, we human beings view our neighbor organisms from our own sensing system. We tend to distinguish forms and structures (i.e., “morphological traits”) mainly through vision. Traditionally, a plant was considered to be consisted of three parts, i.e. the shoot, the leaves and the root. Based on such a “structure-based perspective”, evolutionary analyses or comparisons across species were made on particular parts or their derived structures. So far no conceptual framework has been established to incorporate the morphological traits of all three land plant phyta, i.e. bryophyta, pteridophyta and spermatophyta, for evolutionary developmental analysis. Using the tenets of the recently proposed concept of sexual reproduction cycle (SRC), the major morphological traits of land plants can be aligned into five categories from a function-based evolutionary perspective. From this perspective, and the resulting alignment, a new conceptual framework emerges, called “plant morphogenesis 123”. This framework views a plant as a colony of integrated plant developmental units (PDUs) that are each produced via one life cycle. This view provided an alternative perspective for evolutionary developmental investigation in plants.
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant Stress
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The plant perceptron connects environment to development

The plant perceptron connects environment to development | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Plants cope with the environment in a variety of ways, and ecological analyses attempt to capture this through life-history strategies or trait-based categorization. These approaches are limited because they treat the trade-off mechanisms that underlie plant responses as a black box. Approaches that involve the molecular or physiological analysis of plant responses to the environment have elucidated intricate connections between developmental and environmental signals, but in only a few well-studied model species. By considering diversity in the plant response to the environment as the adaptation of an information-processing network, new directions can be found for the study of life-history strategies, trade-offs and evolution in plants.

Via Jonathan Plett, R K Upadhyay
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Nitrogen use efficiency in crops: lessons from Arabidopsis and rice | Journal of Experimental Botany | Oxford Academic

Nitrogen use efficiency in crops: lessons from Arabidopsis and rice | Journal of Experimental Botany | Oxford Academic | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Application of chemical fertilizers, especially nitrogen (N), to crops has increased dramatically in the last half century and therefore developing crop varieties with improved N use efficiency (NUE) is urgent for sustainable agriculture. N utilization procedures generally can be divided into uptake, transport, and assimilation. Transporters for nitrate or ammonium acquisition and enzymes for assimilation are among the essential components determining NUE, and many transcription factors also play a pivotal role in regulating N use-associated genes, thereby contributing to NUE. Although some efforts in improving NUE have been made in various plants, the regulatory mechanisms underlying NUE are still elusive, and NUE improvement in crop breeding is very limited. In this review, the crucial components involved in N utilization and the candidates with the potential for NUE improvement in dicot Arabidopsis and monocot rice are summarized. In addition, strategies based on new techniques which can be used for dissecting regulatory mechanisms of NUE and also the possible ways in which NUE can be improved in crops are discussed.
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from The Plant Cell
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Multiomics of tomato glandular trichomes reveals distinct features of central carbon metabolism supporting high productivity of specialized metabolites

Multiomics of tomato glandular trichomes reveals distinct features of central carbon metabolism supporting high productivity of specialized metabolites | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Multiomics of tomato glandular trichomes reveals distinct features of central carbon metabolism supporting high productivity of specialized metabolites

Gerd Balcke, Stefan Bennewitz, Nick Bergau, Benedikt Athmer, Anja Henning, Petra Majovsky, José M. Jiménez-Gómez, Wolfgang Hoehenwarter, and Alain F Tissier

Plant Cell 2017 tpc.17.00060; Advance Publication April 13, 2017; doi:10.1105/tpc.17.00060 OPEN


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plants & Evolution
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Asian wild rice is a hybrid swarm with extensive gene flow and feralization from domesticated rice

The domestication history of rice remains controversial, with multiple studies reaching different conclusions regarding its origin(s). These studies have generally assumed that populations of living wild rice, O. rufipogon, are descendants of the ancestral population that gave rise to domesticated rice, but relatively little attention has been paid to the origins and history of wild rice itself. Here, we investigate the genetic ancestry of wild rice by analyzing a diverse panel of rice genomes consisting of 203 domesticated and 435 wild rice accessions. We show that most modern wild rice is heavily admixed with domesticated rice through both pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow. In fact, much presumed wild rice may simply represent different stages of feralized domesticated rice. In line with this hypothesis, many presumed wild rice varieties show remnants of the effects of selective sweeps in previously identified domestication genes, as well as evidence of recent selection in flowering genes possibly associated with the feralization process. Furthermore, there is a distinct geographical pattern of gene flow from aus, indica, and japonica varieties into colocated wild rice. We also show that admixture from aus and indica is more recent than gene flow from japonica, possibly consistent with an earlier spread of japonica varieties. We argue that wild rice populations should be considered a hybrid swarm, connected to domesticated rice by continuous and extensive gene flow.


Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Host-Microbe Interactions. Plant Biology.
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The Magnaporthe oryzae nitrooxidative stress response suppresses rice innate immunity during blast disease

The Magnaporthe oryzae nitrooxidative stress response suppresses rice innate immunity during blast disease | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Magnaporthe oryzae nitronate monooxygenase NMO2 is shown to be required for prevention of damaging lipid nitration and host ROS-mediated innate immune responses in rice plants, enabling biotrophic growth of the rice blast fungus.

Via Tatsuya Nobori
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Microbiome and plant immunity
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The rice LysM receptor-like kinase OsCERK1 is required for the perception of short-chain chitin oligomers in arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling

The rice lysin-motif (LysM) receptor-like kinase OsCERK1 is now known to have a dual role in both pathogenic and symbiotic interactions. Following the recent discovery that the Oscerk1 mutant is unable to host arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we have examined whether OsCERK1 is directly involved in the perception of the short-chain chitin oligomers (Myc-COs) identified in AM fungal exudates and shown to activate nuclear calcium (Ca2+) spiking in the rice root epidermis. An Oscerk1 knockout mutant expressing the cameleon NLS-YC2.60 was used to monitor nuclear Ca2+ signaling following root treatment with either crude fungal exudates or purified Myc-COs. Compared with wild-type rice, Ca2+ spiking responses to AM fungal elicitation were absent in root atrichoblasts of the Oscerk1 mutant. By contrast, rice lines mutated in OsCEBiP, encoding the LysM receptor-like protein which associates with OsCERK1 to perceive chitin elicitors of the host immune defense pathway, responded positively to Myc-COs. These findings provide direct evidence that the bi-functional OsCERK1 plays a central role in perceiving short-chain Myc-CO signals and activating the downstream conserved symbiotic signal transduction pathway.

Via Francis Martin, Giannis Stringlis
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Long-term trends in the intensity and relative toxicity of herbicide use

Long-term trends in the intensity and relative toxicity of herbicide use | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Quantifying the toxicity of herbicides applied in the field is difficult. Here, the author applies a quotient to evaluate changes in relative toxicity over the past 25 years and finds that increased herbicide use does not necessarily constitute increased toxicity.
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Plant and Seed Biology
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The preprophase band of microtubules controls the robustness of division orientation in plants

The preprophase band of microtubules controls the robustness of division orientation in plants | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Controlling cell division plane orientation is essential for morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. In plant cells, the future cortical division plane is marked before mitotic entry by the preprophase band (PPB). Here, we characterized an Arabidopsis trm (TON1 Recruiting Motif) mutant that impairs PPB formation but does not affect interphase microtubules. Unexpectedly, PPB disruption neither abolished the capacity of root cells to define a cortical division zone nor induced aberrant cell division patterns but rather caused a loss of precision in cell division orientation. Our results advocate for a reassessment of PPB function and division plane determination in plants and show that a main output of this microtubule array is to limit spindle rotations in order to increase the robustness of cell division.

Via Loïc Lepiniec
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from The Plant Cell
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IN BRIEF: Meristem Doming and the Transition to Reproductive Development in Tomato

IN BRIEF: Meristem Doming and the Transition to Reproductive Development in Tomato | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it

Meristem Doming and the Transition to Reproductive Development in Tomato

Jennifer Mach

Plant Cell 2017 tpc.17.00302; Advance Publication April 13, 2017; doi:10.1105/tpc.17.00302 OPEN


Via Mary Williams
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Are Circular RNAs New Kids on the Block?

Are Circular RNAs New Kids on the Block? | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Circular RNAs (circ-RNAs), a novel class of noncoding RNAs, are a popular topic in
animal research because they have potential as post-transcriptional regulators and
diagnostic markers. Research in plants is only now emerging, but indicates that circ-RNAs
could also be a crucial class of noncoding regulators.
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PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATORs stabilize CONSTANS protein to promote flowering in response to day length

PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATORs stabilize CONSTANS protein to promote flowering in response to day length | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Seasonal reproduction in many organisms requires detection of day length. This is achieved by integrating information on the light environment with an internal photoperiodic time‐keeping mechanism. Arabidopsis thaliana promotes flowering in response to long days (LDs), and CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor represents a photoperiodic timer whose stability is higher when plants are exposed to light under LDs. Here, we show that PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) proteins directly mediate this stabilization. PRRs interact with and stabilize CO at specific times during the day, thereby mediating its accumulation under LDs. PRR‐mediated stabilization increases binding of CO to the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS T ( FT ), leading to enhanced FT transcription and early flowering under these conditions. PRRs were previously reported to contribute to timekeeping by regulating CO transcription through their roles in the circadian clock. We propose an additional role for PRRs in which they act upon CO protein to promote flowering, directly coupling information on light exposure to the timekeeper and allowing recognition of LDs.

![][1]

To promote flowering of Arabidopsis in response to day length, PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR proteins interact with and stabilize the CONSTANS transcription factor at specific times of day.

[1]: /embed/graphic-1.gif
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from microbial pathogenesis and plant immunity
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Bodyguards: Pathogen-Derived Decoys That Protect Virulence Factors

Bodyguards: Pathogen-Derived Decoys That Protect Virulence Factors | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Recent studies on plant-pathogen interactions have exposed a new strategy used by plant pathogens: decoy effectors that protect virulence factors. Examples of these “bodyguards” include the recently discovered PsXLP1 from Phytophthora sojae and truncated TALEs from Xanthomonas oryzae. These examples suggest important roles for seemingly non-functional effector proteins in distracting the host.

Via Suayib Üstün, Jim Alfano
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Rescooped by Jennifer Mach from Host:microbe Interactions
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Effect of exogenous methyl jasmonate on airborne benzene removal by Zamioculcas zamiifolia: The role of cytochrome P450 expression, salicylic acid, IAA, ROS and antioxidant activity

Effect of exogenous methyl jasmonate on airborne benzene removal by Zamioculcas zamiifolia: The role of cytochrome P450 expression, salicylic acid, IAA, ROS and antioxidant activity | Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology | Scoop.it
Exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has emerged as a promising approach for enhancing plant stress resistance. However, little is known about the effect of exogenous MeJA on promoting airborne benzene removal by plants. Here, we elucidated the effect of various MeJA concentrations on Zamioculcas zamiifolia stress response in relation to antioxidant enzyme activity, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) contents, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and expression levels of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene responsible for benzene hydroxylation. Exogenous MeJA at low physiological levels (10, 30 and 50 μM) enhanced plant resistance to benzene stress through triggering the activities of antioxidant enzymes, enhancing IAA levels and lowering ROS accumulation. Moreover, MeJA at 10, 30 and 50 μM induced the expression levels of P450. Higher expression levels of P450 could indirectly enhance benzene removal ability of the plants. Interestingly, the upregulated P450 trends was consistent with the increasing IAA contents and MeJA concentrations. However, MeJA at high concentrations (100 μM) declined gaseous benzene removal due to limited antioxidant activity, low IAA contents and high ROS accumulation as well as closed stomata. Moreover, under 100 μM MeJA treatment, high levels of ROS and salicylic acid downregulated the expression levels of P450. Our results provide comprehensive evidence with regards to the exogenous application of MeJA for promoting plant stress resistance and enhancing airborne benzene phytoremediation.

Via Jonathan Plett
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