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Collaboration, Curation and Creation, a Way to ...

Collaboration, Curation and Creation, a Way to ... | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Digital Media Literacy - ThingLink... (Collaboration, Curation and Creation, a Way to Digital Media Literacy | @scoopit http://t.co/790DHUXRaS)

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Ra's curator insight, February 25, 2014 11:58 PM

For those in education designing Digital Citizenship programmes thinking through the sequence of skills and knowledge understanding can be a good way to break down the stages of your course.

Sri's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:12 PM

New skills required for the new age. Learn them!

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7 Social Media Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Learn Today and Teach Tomorrow - Brilliant or Insane

7 Social Media Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Learn Today and Teach Tomorrow - Brilliant or Insane | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Students are curating content and impacting the world. Help them make the right choices with these 7 social media strategies.
Ra's insight:

In light of current events in our local environment that have seen a teenager flame the school it becomes very important for schools to recognise that they can not control what students choose to voice. 

Giving students the tools to evaluate the impacts on their own future and the lasting impression they leave may make us all more reflective about how we choose to interact. 

Schools may need to look at their own online presence and contribution to guage what leadership they are showing in online spaces and debates.

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Chemists devise technology that could transform solar energy storage from microseconds to weeks

Chemists devise technology that could transform solar energy storage from microseconds to weeks | emerging learning | Scoop.it

A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks. 


The materials in most of today’s residential rooftop solar panels can store energy from the sun for only a few microseconds at a time. A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks — an advance that could change the way scientists think about designing solar cells.


The findings are published June 19 in the journal Science. The new design is inspired by the way that plants generate energy through photosynthesis.


“Biology does a very good job of creating energy from sunlight,” said Sarah Tolbert, a UCLA professor of chemistry and one of the senior authors of the research. “Plants do this through photosynthesis with extremely high efficiency.”


“In photosynthesis, plants that are exposed to sunlight use carefully organized nanoscale structures within their cells to rapidly separate charges — pulling electrons away from the positively charged molecule that is left behind, and keeping positive and negative charges separated,” Tolbert said. “That separation is the key to making the process so efficient.”


To capture energy from sunlight, conventional rooftop solar cells use silicon, a fairly expensive material.  There is currently a big push to make lower-cost solar cells using plastics, rather than silicon, but today’s plastic solar cells are relatively inefficient, in large part because the separated positive and negative electric charges often recombine before they can become electrical energy.


“Modern plastic solar cells don’t have well-defined structures like plants do because we never knew how to make them before,” Tolbert said. “But this new system pulls charges apart and keeps them separated for days, or even weeks. Once you make the right structure, you can vastly improve the retention of energy.”


The two components that make the UCLA-developed system work are a polymer donor and a nano-scale fullerene acceptor. The polymer donor absorbs sunlight and passes electrons to the fullerene acceptor; the process generates electrical energy.


The plastic materials, called organic photovoltaics, are typically organized like a plate of cooked pasta — a disorganized mass of long, skinny polymer “spaghetti” with random fullerene “meatballs.” But this arrangement makes it difficult to get current out of the cell because the electrons sometimes hop back to the polymer spaghetti and are lost.


The UCLA technology arranges the elements more neatly — like small bundles of uncooked spaghetti with precisely placed meatballs. Some fullerene meatballs are designed to sit inside the spaghetti bundles, but others are forced to stay on the outside.  The fullerenes inside the structure take electrons from the polymers and toss them to the outside fullerene, which can effectively keep the electrons away from the polymer for weeks.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ra's insight:

"A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks."

changes to solar panel construction that could do away with the need for bulky battery storage or any connection to the grid. Rural camp site looking brighter, although maybe somewhere in the future. 

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Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic | PBL | eSkills

Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic | PBL | eSkills | emerging learning | Scoop.it
The Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic presents how teachers can use google apps in project-based learning to streamline learning.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=PBL

 


Via Gust MEES
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Karen Dunlap's curator insight, June 21, 9:51 AM

Fantastic framework! 

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, June 23, 6:02 AM

Aplicaciones de Google en el aprendizaje basado en proyectos. Infografia útil y clarificadora!

Lee Hall's curator insight, June 23, 10:30 AM

More reasons to use Google apps for education with your students. 

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A Visual on Learning Progression

A Visual on Learning Progression | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Great learning progression visual.


Via Beth Dichter
Ra's insight:

Great graphic for teachers to identify the strength of their learning intentions and outcomes.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 10:23 PM

Take a look at this visual that describes the learning progression. It looks at three questions as the starting point:

* What's the learning outcome for the lesson?

* How will I know if students have achieved it?

* How will I check if students have achieved it?

A variety of ideas are shared for each of these questions...short and sweet, and great for visual learners.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 16, 6:11 PM

Thx Beth Dichter

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The ABC's of BYOD for Principals

The ABC's of BYOD for Principals | emerging learning | Scoop.it
BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) can greatly enhance learning, but it also presents new challenges for those responsible for maintaining their school's duty of care towards students, teachers and parents.When planning a BYOD rollout there are a number of considerations to keep in mind to ensure your BYOD program is a success.Student safety comes firstBeing responsible for what children can access online is no easy task. Balancing access with safety for each student year is a decision that each schoo
Ra's insight:

No teacher left behind - love the phrasing. It does take a commitment to build the capacity of teaching staff. Also impacts on the support staff roles in the  school so wider implications are well worth considering. 

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Children’s Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World | UNICEF Publications | UNICEF

Children’s Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World | UNICEF Publications | UNICEF | emerging learning | Scoop.it

How do children see their rights affected by digital media and tools? In July and August 2014, 148 children in 16 countries took part in workshops to discuss the opportunities and risks associated with digital media; these discussions – and the voices of the child participants of the workshops – are reflected in this report


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 29, 4:27 AM

Well worth reading for an insight into the minds and opions of kids/ teens growing up in a digitally connected world.

Manuel Pinto's curator insight, May 30, 5:12 PM

The report here:

http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/Childrens_Rights_in_the_Digital_Age_A_Download_from_Children_Around_the_World_FINAL.pdf

 

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The 25 Most Useful Keyboard Shortcuts For Google Chrome

The 25 Most Useful Keyboard Shortcuts For Google Chrome | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Keyboard shortcuts for Gmail are plentiful, yet there are only a few that are actually useful. Here are the ones that matter most.
Ra's insight:

Pick and choose your own shortcuts. Shortcuts really do speed up working days. 

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Teachers Using Trello: How To Foster Genius In The Classroom

Teachers Using Trello: How To Foster Genius In The Classroom | emerging learning | Scoop.it
See how one 5th grade teacher is working on Genius Hour with his students, with a little help from Trello.
Ra's insight:

Trello is a very useful tool. I'm using it to track the learning interventions we carry out currently. This article is a clear outline of how to use it with a classroom of students for planning and tracking an inquiry project. 

 

Trello allows you to archive cards so if a student decided to reverse a decision and reinstate part of their project, the work would still be accessible. 

 

Links to documents can be imbedded in the cards allowing for quick reference access. 

 

I currently use only the free version of Trello and it has been great. They do offer a 'free month of premium" at some stage once you've been using it for a while. 

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The Bitcoin Blockchain Just Might Save The Music Industry...If Only We Could Understand It

The Bitcoin Blockchain Just Might Save The Music Industry...If Only We Could Understand It | emerging learning | Scoop.it
The Bitcoin Blockchain could save the music industry and help artists monetize and track their creations. However, failure to understand this technology means it may go the way of Creative Commons.
Ra's insight:

Totally out of my depth on this one but very interesting over view. Saddened by the references to CC

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The Global Search for Education: Digital Literacy Tips & Tricks

The Global Search for Education: Digital Literacy Tips & Tricks | emerging learning | Scoop.it

In C. M. Rubin's interview, Howard Rheingold states: "When I decided to write a book about the essential literacies necessary today—with the aim of using the book as a text for a Stanford course—I decided that the essential literacies are attention, crap detection, participation, collaboration, and network awareness."


Via Mary Reilley Clark
Ra's insight:

Great list of what schools do need to be educating students in. A more mindful and kinder approach to online living than constant selfies. 

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, May 18, 11:56 AM

This would be a great article for students to tackle, then choose topics to research. I think it's essential that my middle school students understand who is behind what they read online, and that most of the sites they use are there not to help them share selfies, but to make money.


I harp on the attention issue, because that's my internet Achille's heel. I read this article, got distracted by an email, clicked another link, looked for C.M. Rubin's Twitter name, which meant I stopped to read new tweets...I tell the students I live as an example of what not to do when trying to work online!

Leboldus Library's curator insight, May 20, 11:08 AM

Based on Rheingold's criteria for digital literacy, I would suggest that Canada is also on the "brink of disaster."  These are crucial skills that we ignore at our peril. #rcsdils #saskedchat

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Want to Code on an IPad? Here are 3 Great Apps

Want to Code on an IPad? Here are 3 Great Apps | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Coding has become the poster child for a tech-infused classroom. Over 15 million kids participated in Hour of Code this past December. So many teachers took students to Code.org's curriculum offeri...
Ra's insight:

A range of age appropriate ways to get kids into coding, and a income based argument for their parents!

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Game of Fear: The Story Behind GamerGate

Game of Fear: The Story Behind GamerGate | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Zoe Quinn’s ex-boyfriend was obsessed with destroying her reputation—and thousands of online strangers were eager to help. Read the story behind GamerGate.
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Why online teaching liberates ESL teachers

Why online teaching liberates ESL teachers | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Inspired by her talk at Innovate ELT, guest blogger Jaime Miller of English Success Academy looks at the reasons and pluses for getting into teaching online.


During one of the mini-plenaries at Innovate ELT 2015, in Barcelona, Spain, Duncan Foord referenced a fear in the industry: that EdTech will render teachers obsolete.


Nothing could be further from the truth, and I say that with five years of experience teaching ESL online, and three years of sourcing 100% of my income from private Skype exams lessons for TOEFL iBT (without touching services like iTalki, WizIQ, or CourseEra). As our industry moves forward, teaching will inevitably change – but teachers will remain as essential as they always have been.


At Innovate ELT, I opened a discussion of the future of teaching ESL online with an observation about many English teachers and expats around the world:


Via Dennis T OConnor
Ra's insight:

Perspective of teaching online in english language learning. Implications for learning in all areas. 

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 20, 3:14 PM

This speaks to all who teach online (or want to). The specific audience for Jaime Miller's work are all who teach language.  She's got insights about how to take your practice online. 


Good information here.

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With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species

With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Four leading botanical gardens from around the world want to make it easier for researchers to identify plants in the field.

 

When plant biologists and field researchers come across a species they’ve never seen before, they turn to thick encyclopedia-like volumes called monographs with titles such as Flora Braseliensis that characterize each species in a region in great detail. But not every species has been well-described in this literature. Thomas estimates that only 10 percent of species in the American tropics have been properly characterized. And the reference materials that do exist sometimes don’t match, or are inaccessible to anyone who doesn’t have access through a university.


Four of the world’s leading botanical gardens would like to change that. Since 2012, they have been working toward building a free online database called World Flora Online of the world’s plant species – all 350,000 of them – so that scientists can more easily identify plants and share information about them. Thomas calls it “the WebMD” for plant biology. With a fresh new round of funding this spring including a $1.2 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and a $600,000 commitment from Google accompanied by a pledge to provide cloud storage for the project, the consortium has expanded to include 35 affiliates from around the world.


“Plants are hugely, hugely important for us,” says Doron Weber, vice president at the Sloan Foundation. “Plant research is very promising -- it's necessary for food, for medicines, for various materials. It's also the basis of healthy ecosystems and habitats. You can be completely bottom line about this.”


Via Meristemi, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ra's insight:

This is amazing. A huge project with implications for a range of industry. Not wikipedia but wouldn't you like to be part of it!

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Free Technology for Teachers: Athenir - A Search Engine With Visualizations of Related Terms

Free Technology for Teachers: Athenir - A Search Engine With Visualizations of Related Terms | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Ra's insight:

Visual search engine- useful for students needing assistance with search term generation/connection. 

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Passionate Creativity for Innovation

Passionate Creativity for Innovation | emerging learning | Scoop.it
"You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have." Maya Angelou Do you look or do you see? Is there beauty between the twigs, leaves and drops of dew? Or a smell of dreams still to...
Ra's insight:

In praise of risk takers...

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The Media's Gender Problem Still Looks Awful

The Media's Gender Problem Still Looks Awful | emerging learning | Scoop.it
It's 2015, and media is still a man's world.

According to an annual report by Women's Media Center analyzing 27,758 pieces of content, 62.1 percent of news in 2014 was produced by a man.

The re
Ra's insight:

Shaping the political news landscape - whose views do we see and hear?

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Top 10 Best Free Math Resources on the Web | Edudemic

Top 10 Best Free Math Resources on the Web | Edudemic | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Math is often thought of as a dry subject, but math lovers have been working to show the more interesting side of math to students in many formats.
Ra's insight:

As we launch into ALiM and focus on accelerating learning in maths engaging students is top of our list. 

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Multitenancy with Totara and Moodle - e-Learning Feeds

Multitenancy with Totara and Moodle - e-Learning Feeds | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Multitenancy is a topic that is popping up in discussions around learning management systems. Many people are unsure of whether or not they need it, and so
Ra's insight:

Seems like a pretty straight forward idea. My experience as an online post grad student indicates that multitenancy is how higher ed work their systems. 

 

Looking for a solution to getting LMS to share data across different organisations and different systems. Open source criteria for schools to share data on individuals - be able to import and export data between LMS. 

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The dark past and hopeful future of Canada's indigenous populations

The dark past and hopeful future of Canada's indigenous populations | emerging learning | Scoop.it
The terrible, lasting impact of the Indian Residential School system on Canada's indigenous peoples is immeasurable, even during the healing process.
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Chinese Search Company Baidu Built a Giant Artificial-Intelligence Supercomputer

Chinese Search Company Baidu Built a Giant Artificial-Intelligence Supercomputer | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Chinese search giant Baidu says it has invented a powerful supercomputer that brings new muscle to an artificial-intelligence technique giving software more power to understand speech, images, and written language.

The new computer, called Minwa and located in Beijing, has 72 powerful processors and 144 graphics processors, known as GPUs. Late Monday, Baidu released a paper claiming that the computer had been used to train machine-learning software that set a new record for recognizing images, beating a previous mark set by Google.


“Our company is now leading the race in computer intelligence,” said Ren Wu, a Baidu scientist working on the project, speaking at the Embedded Vision Summit on Tuesday. Minwa’s computational power would probably put it among the 300 most powerful computers in the world if it weren’t specialized for deep learning, said Wu. “I think this is the fastest supercomputer dedicated to deep learning,” he said. “We have great power in our hands—much greater than our competitors.”


Computing power matters in the world of deep learning, which has produced breakthroughs in speech, image, and face recognition and improved the image-search and speech-recognition services offered by Google and Baidu.


The technique is a souped-up version of an approach first established decades ago, in which data is processed by a network of artificial neurons that manage information in ways loosely inspired by biological brains. Deep learning involves using larger neural networks than before, arranged in hierarchical layers, and training them with significantly larger collections of data, such as photos, text documents, or recorded speech.


So far, bigger data sets and networks appear to always be better for this technology, said Wu. That’s one way it differs from previous machine-learning techniques, which had begun to produce diminishing returns with larger data sets. “Once you scaled your data beyond a certain point, you couldn’t see any improvement,” said Wu. “With deep learning, it just keeps going up.” Baidu says that Minwa makes it practical to create an artificial neural network with hundreds of billions of connections—hundreds of times more than any network built before.

 

A paper released Monday is intended to provide a taste of what Minwa’s extra oomph can do. It describes how the supercomputer was used to train a neural network that set a new record on a standard benchmark for image-recognition software. The ImageNet Classification Challenge, as it is called, involves training software on a collection of 1.5 million labeled images in 1,000 different categories, and then asking that software to use what it learned to label 100,000 images it has not seen before.


Software is compared on the basis of how often its top five guesses for a given image miss the correct answer. The system trained on Baidu’s new computer was wrong only 4.58 percent of the time. The previous best was 4.82 percent,reported by Google in March. One month before that, Microsoft had reportedachieving 4.94 percent, becoming the first to better average human performance of 5.1 percent.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 15, 11:57 AM

Question: What IS intelligence?

I guess we're still mistaken about this elusive term so many use on a daily basis—either to degrade or upgrade your status as a human being–without really knowing what it is. Now we're going to have "stupid" 'puters vs. "intelligent" ones. Ah, yet the question remains: Psychopaths, those "snakes in suits" in high places, they are intelligent, aren't they? Yes, of course! Otherwise they wouldn't have been able to get where they are (high places). Empathy is clearly not part of the equation.

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What do students think?

What do students think? | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Two years ago Carmel College made the decision to implement BYOD. Teacher Felicity Timings was asked to evaluate the impact of the programme among 540 Year 7 to 10 students. Here’s a summary of her...
Ra's insight:

A very interesting article to consider. My questions are around the kinds of teaching and learning programmes and opportunities that make up this school's curriculum. 

Research being the key use of devices and students feeling isolated while classes are using devices may be an indication that the collaborative potential is an area that could be developed. 

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Tom Murray

Tom Murray | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Ra's insight:

Clear and concise outline of the requirements for personalised professional development.

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Creating with Technology

Creating with Technology | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Five ways to make your classroom more creative with technology. GUEST COLUMN | by Jessica Sanders  Creativity is no longer relegated to the art room, nor should it be. A 2010 study of 1,500 CEOs, i...
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