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The Difference Between Doing Projects Versus Learning Through Projects

The Difference Between Doing Projects Versus Learning Through Projects | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:46 PM

The graphic (above) provides a nice visual to help understand the difference between project based learning and traditional units with a final project. Where are the differences? Traditional units have lectures, activities, quizzes, a review, an exam the project. With project bases learning you begin with an event plus a rubric and then move through a series of activites that help students reach benchmarks. Project based learning is authentic learning.

More information on this can be found in the post.

Melissa Jenkins 's curator insight, November 16, 2013 9:03 AM

Good visual as to how we should be shifting learning. 

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Breaking Things as a Form of Education

Breaking Things as a Form of Education | emerging learning | Scoop.it
One of my learners' favorite things to do at my maker education summer camps is taking toys apart - breaking them and then putting back together in another form. This got me thinking that breaking things should be part of every teacher's and learner's education. These include: Breaking physical objects apart to see their components…
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I love Jackie and her learners first take on education. 
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Electronic devices that melt in your brain

Electronic devices that melt in your brain | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Two implantable devices developed by American and Chinese researchers are designed to dissolve in the brain over time and may eliminate several current problems with implants.

 

University of Pennsylvania researchers have developed an electrode and an electrode array, both made of layers of silicon and molybdenum that can measure physiological characteristics (like neuron signals) and dissolve at a known rate (determined by the material’s thickness). The team used the device in anesthetized rats to record brain waves (EEGs) and induced epileptic spikes in intact live tissue.

 

In another experiment, they showed the dissolvable electronics could be used in a complex, multiplexed ECoG (intracranial electroencephalography) array over a 30-day period.

 

As the researchers note online in Nature Materials, this new technology offers equal or greater resolution for measuring the brain’s electrical activity, compared to conventional electrodes, while eliminating “the risks, cost, and discomfort associated with surgery to extract current devices used for post-operative monitoring,” according to senior co-author Brian Litt, MD, a professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Bioengineering at the Perelman School of Medicine.

 

Other potential uses of the dissolvable electronics include:

Disorders such as epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, depression, chronic pain, and conditions of the peripheral nervous system. “These measurements are critically important for mapping and monitoring brain function during and in preparation for neurosurgery, for assisting in device placement, such as for Parkinson’s disease, and for guiding surgical procedures on complex, interconnected nerve structures,” Litt said.Post-operative monitoring and recording of physiological characteristic after minimally invasive placement of vascular, cardiac, orthopaedic, neural or other devices. At present, post-operative monitoring is based on clinical examination or interventional radiology, which is invasive, expensive, and impractical for continuous monitoring over days to months.Heart and brain surgery for applications such as aneurysm coiling, stent placement, embolization, and endoscopic operations. These new devices could also monitor structures that are exposed during surgery, but are too delicate to disturb later by removing devices.More complex devices that also include flow, pressure, and other measurement capabilities.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Just to repeat...MELT in your BRAIN
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The Future of Wi-Fi Is 10,000 Times More Energy Efficient

The Future of Wi-Fi Is 10,000 Times More Energy Efficient | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Engineering students have discovered a way to reflect Wi-Fi packets instead of broadcasting them. It’s a problem that’s rapidly getting worse as more and more devices require access to the cloud, not to mention the constant strain of searching for a good signal or boosting a weak one.

 

The student researchers invented a new type of hardware that uses 10,000 times less power than traditional Wi-Fi networking equipment. It’s called Passive Wi-Fi, (you canread their paper here) and it works just like a home router, just more efficiently. To give some perspective, the state of the art in low power Wi-Fi transmissions today consume 100s of milliwatts of power, whereas the technology the student researchers developed consume only 10-50 microwatts—10,000 times lower power. 

 

Wi-Fi typically requires two radios to communicate back and forth, and it takes a lot of energy to discern the signal from the noise because there may be several devices using the same frequency (2.4 GHz or 5 GHz). Each device has an RF transmitter that creates a radio wave and a baseband chip that encodes that radio wave with data. With Passive Wi-Fi, instead of each device using an analog radio frequency to receive and transmit a signal, just one produces a radio frequency. That frequency is relayed to your Wi-Fi-enabled device via separate, passive sensors that have only the baseband chip and an antenna and require almost no power. Those sensors pick up the signal and mirror it in a way that sends readable Wi-Fi to any device that has a Wi-Fi chipset in it. This may sound a lot like a mesh network, with the signal bouncing from antenna point to antenna point, but it’s not. A mesh network uses multiple routers, with full analog RF transmitters and digital baseband chips to receive and rebroadcast a signal.

 

“The low power passive device isn’t transmitting anything at all. It’s creating Wi-Fi packets just by reflection,” says Vamsi Talla, another student working on the project. “It’s a transmission technique that’s ultra low-powered, as opposed to a network device.” That “reflection” happens via a process called “backscatter,” and the students at UW have created Wi-Fi equipment that sends out a signal via backscatter instead of using a full radio signal.

 

Right now most devices do not have the backscatter hardware inside of them to send Wi-Fi packets back to the Internet-connected router. But if this technology takes off, it could increase the amount of devices that are connected to the Internet because it nearly nullifies previous energy constraints of making a device Wi-Fi compatible.

 

To be clear, Passive Wi-Fi still requires running one Wi-Fi router, and Wi-Fi routers aren’t super energy efficient. The Environmental Projection Agency even created an Energy Star certification for home networking devices in 2013 to try to encourage the manufacture of less energy intensive devices. According to the EPA’s website, “If all small network equipment sold in the United States were ENERGY STAR certified, the energy cost savings would grow to more than $590 million each year and more than 7 billion pounds of annual greenhouse gas emissions would be prevented.”  The energy savings with Passive Wi-Fi come from the Wi-Fi transmission chipset in devices that communicate via wireless Internet, not the router connected to the initial uplink.

 

It’s hard to say what this will do for your battery life, because there are so many components in a device that impact that—like the screen, for example. “But using Passive Wi-Fi would improve battery life by about as much as turning your Wi-Fi off would,” said Bryce Kellogg, an electrical engineering graduate student at UW who co-developed Passive Wi-Fi.

 

In the future, these passive sensors may even end up in our devices themselves, reflecting packets to send back to the router instead of broadcasting new transmitter waves. For now, using the hardware can reduce the energy used to spread Wi-Fi to devices.

 

“Our passive Wi-Fi devices now talk up to 11 megabits per second,” said Kellogg. For comparison’s sake, that’s 11 times faster than Bluetooth. One of the main selling points of devices communicating via Bluetooth rather than Wi-Fi has been Bluetooth’s comparatively low energy consumption. But Passive Wi-Fi is 1,000 times more energy efficient than Bluetooth, and the network can be secured like any Wi-Fi signal can, unlike Bluetooth.

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Design Thinking, Deconstructed

Design Thinking, Deconstructed | emerging learning | Scoop.it
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn

 

 


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Arnie Rotenberg's curator insight, March 2, 1:25 PM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



יפה בן-דרור's curator insight, March 2, 4:10 PM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



Melanie COVINHES's curator insight, March 8, 4:29 AM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy | emerging learning | Scoop.it
When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

We will discuss the video.

We will discuss the story.

We will discuss our results.

Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

Via John Evans
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Resource for teachers looking to open up their class discussion strategies. 

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 22, 12:57 PM

Discussion is required for learning in every level of classrooms. This article offers both  high level planning and low level planning. Well worth the time to read this.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 12:20 PM
Genuine class discussions -- singing my song!
Ainsley Ballinger's curator insight, May 2, 12:02 AM

Great ideas to promote in-class discussion. Will be referring to when creating lesson plans for my placement. 

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Autism: See the Potential

This video is designed to assist customer service representatives, and other service professionals when they provide services or support to people with autism spectrum…

Via Bookmarking Librarian
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Great for teachers as an introduction to thinking about UDL and the needs of individual learners. 

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The YouTube Guide to Self-Directed Learning — Emerging Education Technologies

The YouTube Guide to Self-Directed Learning — Emerging Education Technologies | emerging learning | Scoop.it
These Videos Explore Ideas and Techniques and Offer Real World Examples That can Help Inspire a Self-Directed Learning Mindset in Your Students Just about anyone working in education sees Self-Directed Learning as a hugely desirable outcome. Like ‘Holy Grail’ desirable.
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The links between mould, cold and children’s learning • Child Poverty Action Group

The links between mould, cold and children’s learning • Child Poverty Action Group | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Child Poverty Action Group, New Zealand
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John O'Neill on the state of NZ housing for those in low socio economic conditions. 

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Learning in the digital age - theory and practice

Learning technology is just about everywhere in education. Universities are replete with lecture capture tools, interactive media, web based content and person…
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Mr Wheeler strikes again. Education with a sense of humour. It's current, it's captivating. Wishing for the audio. 

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Meet The Revolutionary Wireless Technology That Is 100 Times Faster Than Wi-Fi

Meet The Revolutionary Wireless Technology That Is 100 Times Faster Than Wi-Fi | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Imagine a world where every one of the billions of lightbulbs in use today is a wireless hotspot delivering connectivity at speeds that can only be dreamed of with Wi-Fi. That's the goal of the man who invented such a technology, and this week Li-Fi took a step out of the domain of science fiction and into the realm of the real when it was shown to deliver speeds 100 times faster than current Wi-Fi technology in actual tests.


An Estonian startup called Velmenni used a Li-Fi-enabled lightbulb to transmit data at speeds as fast as 1 gigabit per second (Gbps), which is about 100 times faster than current Wi-Fi technology, meaning a high-definition film could be downloaded within seconds. The real-world test is the first to be carried out, but laboratory tests have shown theoretical speeds of 224 Gbps.


So, just what is Li-Fi, how does it work, and will it really revolutionize the way we connect to the Internet? Li-Fi refers to visible light communications (VLC) technology, which delivers high-speed, bidirectional, networked mobile communications in a manner similar to Wi-Fi. It promises huge speed advantages, as well as more-secure communications and reduced device interference.


The term was coined by German physicist Harald Haas during a TED Talk when he outlined the idea of using lightbulbs as wireless routers. That address was delivered four years ago, and many people speculated that, like a lot of apparent revolutionary breakthroughs, Li-Fi would go the way of other "next big things" and not come to fruition. A year after his TED Talk, though, Haas, a professor of mobile communications at the University of Edinburgh, created pureLiFi with a group of people who had been researching the technology since 2008. The company has claimed to be the "recognized leaders in Li-Fi technology" and has already produced two products. On Wednesday, pureLiFi announced a partnership in which a French industrial-lighting company will roll out the firm's VLC technology in its products by the third quarter of 2016.


Haas said during his Ted Talk in 2011 that the current infrastructure would allow every single LED lightbulb to be transformed into an ultrafast wireless router. "All we need to do is fit a small microchip to every potential illumination device and this would then combine two basic functionalities: illumination and wireless data transmission," Haas said. "In the future, we will not only have 14 billion lightbulbs, we may have 14 billion Li-Fis deployed worldwide for a cleaner, greener and even brighter future."


Because Li-Fi technology uses visible light as its means of communication, it won't work through walls. This means that to have a Li-Fi network throughout your house, you will need these lightbulbs in every room (and maybe even the fridge) to have seamless connectivity.


Another major issue is that Li-Fi does not work outdoors, meaning that public Li-Fi will not be able to replace public Wi-Fi networks any time soon. While Li-Fi's employment in direct sunlight won't be possible, pureLiFi said that through the use of filters the technology can be used indoors even when sunlight is present.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Culture of Connectivity.pdf

The Culture of Connectivity.pdf | emerging learning | Scoop.it

e-book by Jose van Dijk


Via Derek Wenmoth
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Derek Wenmoth's curator insight, November 14, 2015 11:21 PM

Great to see such an in-depth work on the history of social media - and how it has and is shaping the society of users. A lengthy tombe, but well indexed. 

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Sask. professor hosts class of thousands to talk about being a good digital citizen

Sask. professor hosts class of thousands to talk about being a good digital citizen | emerging learning | Scoop.it
A U of R professor will deliver an online lecture to thousands of students about being a good digital citizen, or #digcit.
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The awesomeness that is Alec Couros talking to kids about #digcit 

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When terror strikes, here’s what you should tell children

When terror strikes, here’s what you should tell children | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Parents, teachers should not avoid the attacks, expert says, as even the youngest may need to talk.
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Avoiding the cycle of silence. Talking about what is happening in the world around them and finding ways they can be proactive, make a difference to someone else, even just one other person, can help children feel they have agency in their world. 

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Turning gamers into digital designers

Turning gamers into digital designers | emerging learning | Scoop.it
During an open night at Shirley Boys’ High School for prospective families, a group of Year 10 students waited for their audience. The lads fired up their devices, pulled out decks of cards and it …
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Collaborative learning environment with a by-product of an awesome resource created by students. 
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Teaching assistant wasn't human and nobody guessed it

Teaching assistant wasn't human and nobody guessed it | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Jill Watson is a virtual teaching assistant. She was one of nine teaching assistants in an artificial intelligence online course. And none of the students guessed she wasn't a human.

 

College of Computing Professor Ashok Goel teaches Knowledge Based Artificial Intelligence (KBAI) every semester. It's a core requirement of Georgia Tech's online master's of science in computer science program. And every time he offers it, Goel estimates, his 300 or so students post roughly 10,000 messages in the online forums -- far too many inquiries for him and his eight teaching assistants (TA) to handle. That's why Goel added a ninth TA this semester. Her name is Jill Watson, and she's unlike any other TA in the world. In fact, she's not even a "she." Jill is a computer -- a virtual TA -- implemented on IBM's Watson platform.

 

"The world is full of online classes, and they're plagued with low retention rates," Goel said. "One of the main reasons many students drop out is because they don't receive enough teaching support. We created Jill as a way to provide faster answers and feedback."

 

Goel and his team of Georgia Tech graduate students started to build her last year. They contacted Piazza, the course's online discussion forum, to track down all the questions that had ever been asked in KBAI since the class was launched in fall 2014 (about 40,000 postings in all). Then they started to feed Jill the questions and answers.

 

"One of the secrets of online classes is that the number of questions increases if you have more students, but the number of different questions doesn't really go up," Goel said. "Students tend to ask the same questions over and over again."

 

That's an ideal situation for the Watson platform, which specializes in answering questions with distinct, clear solutions. The team wrote code that allows Jill to field routine questions that are asked every semester. For example, students consistently ask where they can find particular assignments and readings.

 

Jill wasn't very good for the first few weeks after she started in January, often giving odd and irrelevant answers. Her responses were posted in a forum that wasn't visible to students.

"Initially her answers weren't good enough because she would get stuck on keywords," said Lalith Polepeddi, one of the graduate students who co-developed the virtual TA. "For example, a student asked about organizing a meet-up to go over video lessons with others, and Jill gave an answer referencing a textbook that could supplement the video lessons -- same keywords -- but different context. So we learned from mistakes like this one, and gradually made Jill smarter."

 

After some tinkering by the research team, Jill found her groove and soon was answering questions with 97 percent certainty. When she did, the human TAs would upload her responses to the students. By the end of March, Jill didn't need any assistance: She wrote the class directly if she was 97 percent positive her answer was correct.

 

The students, who were studying artificial intelligence, were unknowingly interacting with it. Goel didn't inform them about Jill's true identity until April 26. The student response was uniformly positive. One admitted her mind was blown. Another asked if Jill could "come out and play." Since then some students have organized a KBAI alumni forum to learn about new developments with Jill after the class ends, and another group of students has launched an open source project to replicate her.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Amazing!
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Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom | emerging learning | Scoop.it
8 Pathways to Every Student's Success
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Building more reflective critical thinkers. Short and sharp with good starters for teachers. 
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A Collection of Resources for Teaching Social Justice

A Collection of Resources for Teaching Social Justice | emerging learning | Scoop.it
Want your students to actively engage in addressing inequality? Explore this annotated bibliography of resources for teaching students about social justice.
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Social Justice resources targeted at American situations and histories. Clever teachers will find inspiration for the NZ situation. Waitangi would be a fascinating area to consider. Anyone with a resource bank for this subject?

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How schools avoid enrolling children with disabilities

How schools avoid enrolling children with disabilities | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Children with disabilities are frequently discriminated against in Australian schools, with parents asked to send their child to another school or fork out extra money.


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Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself

Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Instead of just supporting her husband’s career, Margaret Hamilton invented the modern concept of software.


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New video game, Project: EVO from Akili, aims to help kids with ADHD

New video game, Project: EVO from Akili, aims to help kids with ADHD | emerging learning | Scoop.it
The makers of "Project: EVO" call it "digital medicine in the form of a video game," but will it really work?
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Can video games help those living with ADHD train their brains to focus on and sort information for extended periods of time?

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The 10,000 Hour Rule Is Wrong. How to Really Master a Skill

The 10,000 Hour Rule Is Wrong. How to Really Master a Skill | emerging learning | Scoop.it

Additionally, Gladwell failed to adequately distinguish between the quantity of hours spent practicing, and the quality of that practice. This misses a huge portion of Ericsson’s findings, and is the reason why Tim Ferriss scoffs at Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule in this video.


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Aline Choupin's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:26 PM

Very interesting. A must read.

Serge G Laurens's curator insight, December 27, 2015 2:59 PM

The 10,000 Hour Rule Is Wrong. How to Really Master a Skill

TD's curator insight, March 8, 6:03 PM

Great. I've always thought this 10k hours rule to be incredibly simplistic.

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It's Not a Technology Issue

It's Not a Technology Issue | emerging learning | Scoop.it
The point here is that it is not a technology issue, but many people make it one. The behavior argument that many make is flawed. It is first and foremost a school culture issue, which falls on the shoulders of leaders. Schools and districts that have embraced technology through a shared vision and resulting plan focused on learning reinforce appropriate use.
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Interesting read for those who have worked to empower students in choosign their learning behaviours. 

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Henry Jenkins on Participatory Media in Networked Era, Part 1

Henry Jenkins on Participatory Media in Networked Era, Part 1 | emerging learning | Scoop.it
You are probably reading this because you are interested in the use of digital media in learning. My single strongest recommendation to you: if you want the best and latest evidence-based, authoritative, nuanced, critical knowledge about how digital media and networks are transforming not just learning but commercial media, citizen participation in democracy, and the everyday practices of young people, my advice is to obtain a copy of the new book, “Participatory Culture in A Networked Era,” by

Via Derek Wenmoth
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Love listening to Howard Rheingold. It's a treat. Plus for educators thinking about social justice and empowering students, good discussion points for the planning sessions.

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Derek Wenmoth's curator insight, November 14, 2015 11:13 PM

This book is the opposite of so much sound-bite generalization about “digital natives” and “Twitter revolutions.” Jenkins, Ito, and boyd seek to unpack the nuances behind the generalizations of digital media enthusiasts and critics alike, rather than to reduce them to easily digested phrases. And, they articulate their knowledge clearly. They not only know this subject matter as well as anyone on the planet, they know how to talk about it.

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TeacherCal

TeacherCal | emerging learning | Scoop.it
TeacherCal is the free teacher planning calendar for Google Apps.
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Teachers using G.Drive and Classroom might want to have a look at the quick tutorial. 

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Enlearn Wins $3M Grant for Adaptive Learning Platform (EdSurge News)

Enlearn Wins $3M Grant for Adaptive Learning Platform (EdSurge News) | emerging learning | Scoop.it
ENLEARN has been awarded a grant of $3 million from the Gates Foundation’s College Ready program to further pilot its software in classrooms. The Seattle-based nonprofit makes an adaptive platform for digital courseware, games and assessments.
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