Embodied Zeitgeist
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Embodied Zeitgeist
Exploration of The Zeitgeist as embodied in Humans
Curated by Xaos
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Ramez Naam - Infinite Resource, Graduate Studies Program 2012

Learn more at Singularityu.org In this video, Ramez Naam summarizes the pain points his new book 'The Infinite Resource' addresses. For the full lecture, bec...

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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 7, 2013 3:25 AM

In this remarkable book, Ramez Naam charts a course to supercharge innovation -- by changing the rules of our economy -- that will lead the whole world to greater wealth and human well-being, even as we dodge looming resource crunches and reduce our impact on the planet.

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Top 11 emerging scientific fields | Impact Lab

Top 11 emerging scientific fields | Impact Lab | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
 HD 189733b, an exoplanet whose atmosphere is being blown off by its sun's solar flares, was discovered by the emerging field of exo-meteorology. Science
Xaos's insight:

"Science is advancing, and as it does, fields like biology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy are becoming increasingly specialized and interdisciplinary, leading to entirely new avenues of inquiry.  Here re 11 emerging scientific fields you should know about."

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Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer

Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
If we want to protect privacy, we should be more clear about why it is important.

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Our privacy is now at risk in unprecedented ways, but, sadly, the legal system is lagging behind the pace of innovation. Indeed, the last major privacy law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, was passed in 1986! While an update to the law -- spurred on by the General Petraeus scandal -- is in the works, it only aims to add some more protection to electronic communication like emails. This still does not shield our privacy from other, possibly nefarious, ways that our data can be collected and put to use. Some legislators would much rather not have legal restrictions that could, as Rep. Marsha Blackburn stated in an op-ed, "threaten the lifeblood of the Internet: data." Consider Rep. Blackburn's remarks during an April 2010 Congressional hearing: "[A]nd what happens when you follow the European privacy model and take information out of the information economy? ... Revenues fall, innovation stalls and you lose out to innovators who choose to work elsewhere."

 

Even though the practices of many companies such as Facebook are legal, there is something disconcerting about them. Privacy should have a deeper purpose than the one ascribed to it by those who treat it as a currency to be traded for innovation, which in many circumstances seems to actually mean corporate interests. To protect our privacy, we need a better understanding of its purpose and why it is valuable.


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Wildcat2030's curator insight, February 27, 2013 6:52 AM

An important read..

Kurt Laitner's curator insight, February 27, 2013 8:20 PM

"Privacy should have a deeper purpose than the one ascribed to it by those who treat it as a currency to be traded for innovation, which in many circumstances seems to actually mean corporate interests....It is better understood as an important buffer that gives us space to develop an identity that is somewhat separate from the surveillance, judgment, and values of our society and culture...we must decide if we really want to live in a society that treats every action as a data point to be analyzed and traded like currency...Privacy is not just something we enjoy. It is something that is necessary for us to: develop who we are; form an identity that is not dictated by the social conditions that directly or indirectly influence our thinking, decisions, and behaviors; and decide what type of society we want to live in."

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RI Channel: Life Without a Pulse

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In March of 2011 Dr Bud Frazier and Dr Billy Cohn of the Texas Heart Institute removed the dying heart of patient Craig A. Lewis and successfully replaced it with a 'continuous flow' pumping device.

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CYBORG FOUNDATION | Rafel Duran Torrent

CYBORG FOUNDATION is the Grand Jury Prize Winner in the $200,000 GE FOCUS FORWARD Filmmaker Competition. Watch the winners at http://www.focusforwardfilms.com/winners. Neil…
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Neil Harbisson was born with achromatopsia, a rare condition that causes complete colour blindness. In 2004, Harbisson and Adam Montandon developed the eyeborg, a device that translates colours into sounds.
Harbisson has been claimed to be the first recognized cyborg in the world, as his passport photo now includes his device. In 2010, Neil Harbisson and Moon Ribas created the Cyborg Foundation, an international organization to help humans become cyborgs.

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The Geography of Happiness According to 10 Million Tweets

The Geography of Happiness According to 10 Million Tweets | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The happiest city in America is Napa, California -- and the saddest all swear too much.

 

The researchers coded each tweet for its happiness content, based on the appearance and frequency of words determined by Mechanical Turk workers to be happy (rainbow, love, beauty, hope, wonderful, wine) or sad (damn, boo, ugly, smoke, hate, lied). While the researchers admit their technique ignores context, they say that for large datasets, simply counting the words and averaging their happiness content produces "reliable" results.


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Miguel Nicolelis: A monkey that controls a robot with its thoughts

Can we use our brains to directly control machines -- without requiring a body as the middleman? Miguel Nicolelis talks through an astonishing experiment, in which a clever monkey in the US learns to control a monkey avatar, and then a robot arm in Japan, purely with its thoughts. The research has big implications for quadraplegic people -- and maybe for all of us.


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Clay Shirky on the Demise of the Newspaper

Clay Shirky on the Demise of the Newspaper | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Clay Shirky, who does a lot of good thinking (see his latest book) about the social and economic effects of internet technologies, has posted a new piece on the slow but steady demise of the newspaper.

Via jean lievens
Xaos's insight:

"Society doesn’t need newspapers. What we need is journalism. For a century, the imperatives to strengthen journalism and to strengthen newspapers have been so tightly wound as to be indistinguishable. That’s been a fine accident to have, but when that accident stops, as it is stopping before our eyes, we’re going to need lots of other ways to strengthen journalism instead."

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Hacktivism 2.0 - P2P Foundation

Hacktivism 2.0 - P2P Foundation | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
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Hacktivism 1.0 was the activism of outsiders. Its organizing principle was to get outsiders into the territory of the other. Wikileaks, on the other hand, is an infostructure developed to be used by insiders. Its sole purpose is to help people get information out from an organization. Wikileaks shifts the source of potential threat from a few, dangerous hackers and a larger group of mostly harmless activists — both outsiders to an organization

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10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth

10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
It wasn't too long ago that the term 'Smart City' was not on very many people's radar screens, but today smart cities are popping up all over the place and
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The Groundbreaking Technology Set To Revolutionize Privacy and Terrify Governments

The Groundbreaking Technology Set To Revolutionize Privacy and Terrify Governments | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
For the past few months, some of the world’s leading cryptographers have been keeping a closely guarded secret about a pioneering new invention. Today, they’ve decided it’s time to tell all.
Xaos's insight:

Now, the company is pushing things even further—with a groundbreaking encrypted data transfer app that will enable people to send files securely from a smartphone or tablet at the touch of a button. (For now, it’s just being released for iPhones and iPads, though Android versions should come soon.) That means photographs, videos, spreadsheets, you name it—sent scrambled from one person to another in a matter of seconds.

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The shape of things to come: A consumer\'s guide to 3D printers

The shape of things to come: A consumer\'s guide to 3D printers | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
CES 2013 proved to be something of a coming out party for consumer-facing 3D printers. Sure MakerBot earned a fair amount of attention at last year\'s
Xaos's insight:

hese nascent days are an exciting time, with a diverse array of companies and organizations vying to be the first to bring the technology to our homes. In a sense, many roads lead back to RepRap, the open-source, community-fueled project aimed at creating a self-replicating machine. As such, the same basic technology underlies many of these devices. At their core, these 3D printers are not unlike their 2D counterparts, offering a way to translate images on computer screens into real-world analogs -- only in this case they're objects you can hold in your hand.

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Lee Cronin: Print your own medicine | Video on TED.com

Chemist Lee Cronin is working on a 3D printer that, instead of objects, is able to print molecules. An exciting potential long-term application: printing your own medicine using chemical inks.

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FastTFriend's curator insight, February 9, 2013 10:38 AM

 

A professor of chemistry, nanoscience and chemical complexity, Lee Cronin and his research group investigate how chemistry can revolutionize modern technology and even create life.

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Microsoft's latest vision of the future is a world of giant screens and sensors

Microsoft's latest vision of the future is a world of giant screens and sensors | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Ahead of Microsoft's annual TechForum event, the company is sharing its latest vision of the future. Focused on home and work, Microsoft puts forward a vision of multiple giant displays powered by...
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This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
This stick-on silicon electrode network is wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor.

 

FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.

The development takes wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor that could be used to measure hydration, activity, and even infant temperature. It bonds to the skin, somewhat like a temporary tattoo, flexing and bending in sync with your skin the way you wish a Band-Aid would. How? Researchers at the University of Illinois, Dalian University of Technology in China, and the University of California at San Diego made it really, really small.

With a thickness of 0.8 micrometers at the widest — around one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair — the thin mesh of silicon actually nestles in to the grooves and creases in your skin, even the ones too small to see. Being small helps, but it’s also important that the silicon is laid out in a serpentine pattern and bonded to a soft rubber substrate, allowing the stiff material to flex, a little bit like an accordion.

“Although electronics, over the years, has developed into an extremely sophisticated form of technology, all existing commercial devices in electronics involve silicon wafers as the supporting substrate,” says John Rogers, who led the study published this week in Advanced Materials.


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Matthew Booth's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:31 AM

This article shows the miniaturisation of the medical world, while we still see big bulky machines in hospitals, one day everything might be as small and as unnoticeable. The photos and information show just how tiny this is and will be good to show in the essay, how this technology can be nano.

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Sugata Mitra: Build a School in the Cloud | Video on TED.com

Onstage at TED2013, Sugata Mitra makes his bold TED Prize wish: Help me design the School in the Cloud, a learning lab in India, where children can explore and learn from each other -- using resources and mentoring from the cloud.

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starwalker's curator insight, February 28, 2013 2:54 AM

a brilliant thought in the future of education, Sugata Mitra won TED prize this month

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Biohackers Create a DIY Bioprinter | MIT Technology Review

Biohackers Create a DIY Bioprinter | MIT Technology Review | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Members of the biohacker movement have created an inexpensive device to print cells. Will they print a leaf next?
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Google Glass

Google Glass | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Have what it takes to be a Glass Explorer? Tell us what you would do if you had Glass #ifihadglass
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The Rich See a Different Internet Than the Poor: Scientific American

The Rich See a Different Internet Than the Poor: Scientific American | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Ninety-nine percent of us live on the wrong side of a one-way mirror

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Imagine an Internet where unseen hands curate your entire experience. Where third parties predetermine the news, products and prices you see—even the people you meet. A world where you think you are making choices, but in reality, your options are narrowed and refined until you are left with merely the illusion of control.

 

This is not far from what is happening today. Thanks to technology that enables Google, Facebook and others to gather information about us and use it to tailor the user experience to our own personal tastes, habits and income, the Internet has become a different place for the rich and for the poor. Most of us have become unwitting actors in an unfolding drama about the tale of two Internets. There is yours and mine, theirs and ours.


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Wildcat2030's curator insight, February 20, 2013 6:42 AM

go read this: important

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Concept Video Shows The Book Of The Future - Edudemic

Concept Video Shows The Book Of The Future - Edudemic | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The book of the future is being written right now, it seems. Check out this video for one take on what it might look like.

Via nukem777, Wildcat2030
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nukem777's curator insight, February 15, 2013 7:52 PM

Very cool...I want it now!

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3D Printing Revolution: the Complex Reality

3D Printing Revolution: the Complex Reality | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Affordable and hobbyist-friendly manufacturing tools that convert polygons into physical objects have been available for more than a decade. Although new technologies such as ABS extruders are diff...
Xaos's insight:

"I am excited about 3D printing, but also uneasy with our way of thinking about the future of home manufacturing. For the driven hobbyists, the printer is just another tool that allows them to bring their designs to life. It shares many of its problems with the approaches that existed before – and adds its own serious challenges to the mix. Perhaps the best we can do is to learn from the manufacturing industry, rather than proclaiming its untimely death."

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Synthetic Biology - Inventing the Future

The hottest new field in biotech is synthetic biology: Scientists can now re-program life at the cellular level, just like a computer program. Syn-bio expert...
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Inventing the Future is a live news program featuring coming trends that will shape society. In today's world, success means knowing "What's Next After What's Next?" Lead by Robert Tercek, Inventing the Future offers insight into the future of the world after tomorrow

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A Peek Into The Circle

Send a secure text across town or whisper in someone's ear 10,000 miles away. Silent Circle has revolutionized how the world communicates ... securely. Get i...
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Google Now: Trading Your Privacy For The Future

Google Now: Trading Your Privacy For The Future | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
If you surveyed a few people on the street and asked them what Google Inc.
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What is the next frontier it has begun to index?

You.

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