Embodied Zeitgeist
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Embodied Zeitgeist
Exploration of The Zeitgeist as embodied in Humans
Curated by Xaos
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Google’s Next Phase in Driverless Cars: No Brakes or Steering Wheel

Google’s Next Phase in Driverless Cars: No Brakes or Steering Wheel | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Google has begun building a fleet of 100 experimental electric-powered vehicles that will dispense with all the standard controls found in modern automobiles and take the driver out of driving.
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The Energy Internet Explained, with Jeremy Rifkin - YouTube

Don't miss new Big Think videos!  Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Economic theorist and author Jeremy Rifkin explains his concept of The Int...
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How Human Rights Will Change When Everyone Can Upgrade Their Brains

How Human Rights Will Change When Everyone Can Upgrade Their Brains | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The analysts at the Institute for the Future present new research about our weird times. 
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Ultimaker Co-Founder at TEDxUTRECHT - 3D Printing Industry

Ultimaker Co-Founder at TEDxUTRECHT - 3D Printing Industry | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Siert Wijnia, one of the co-founders of Ultimaker attended TEDxUTRECHT to talk about the impact of 3D Printers.
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Synthetic biology gets reborn as an aesthetic dream - 28 April 2014 - New Scientist

Synthetic biology gets reborn as an aesthetic dream - 28 April 2014 - New Scientist | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
In Synthetic Aesthetics, researchers and designers team up to present an exciting way of learning from nature

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SYNTHETIC biology is not like other sciences. At its first big conference, held just 10 years ago at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the startling initial premise was that life is simply too complicated for biotechnologists to easily modify and that it would be better if engineers rebuilt life from scratch so the created organisms did exactly what was required.

The youthful enthusiasm that powered the field, and brought together engineers, biologists, computer scientists, physicists and biohackers, persists today. There have been a few major achievements, most notably last month's creation of a computer-designed yeast chromosome. And before that, the creation of the first synthetic cell.

Alongside this big science, researchers have built libraries of standard DNA code that controls different things inside cells. The dream is that one day it will be easy to design novel organisms using DNA as the programming language. Synthetic biology's headline-grabbing achievement is its annual International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition, which attracts hundreds of student teams to reprogram organisms. Last year's winners re-engineered the bacterium E. coli to recycle gold from electronic waste. At iGEM, the defensive attitude of biotech is replaced with one of turn up, take part, and talk.

As artist Daisy Ginsberg puts it, design "is about possibility", the unimagined things that life could be. Synthetic biology, she writes, has been addressing "humanity's needs" – limitless fuel, for example – rather than "our needs as individual, diverse and complex humans". This is refreshing: worries about the separation between the top-down design of the future and those who must live with the designs are quite rare in science.


Via Wildcat2030
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Will a world government work? – Luis Cabrera – Aeon

Will a world government work? – Luis Cabrera – Aeon | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
World government is back, in geopolitics and in the academy, but what does the future hold?
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10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 | MIT Technology Review

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 | MIT Technology Review | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it

Technology news is full of incremental developments, but few of them are true milestones. Here we’re citing 10 that are. These advances from the past year all solve thorny problems or create powerful new ways of using technology. They are breakthroughs that will matter for years to come.


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Bionic plants could light the future

Bionic plants could light the future | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Imagine a world where trees light our way at night and branches are antennae. This vision to harness plants as a source of energy has its roots in a groundbreaking study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Xaos's insight:
'It is important we start to see plants as the starting point of technology. They have these advantages of self-repair and are made of materials that survive harsh environments and have their own water source,'- Researcher Michael Strano
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Discover the Convergence of Tech and Finance at the Exponential Finance Conference, June 10-11

Discover the Convergence of Tech and Finance at the Exponential Finance Conference, June 10-11 | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
CNBC and Singularity University are partnering to present Exponential Finance, a two-day conference to explore upcoming, game-changing
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The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism | KurzweilAI

The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism | KurzweilAI | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of
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Scientists regenerate organ in mice in world-first breakthrough

Scientists regenerate organ in mice in world-first breakthrough | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Results on regenerated thymus in very old mice potentially open way for helping humans live longer

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Scientists have regenerated a living organ for the first time, potentially opening the way for life-lengthening human therapies.

A team at Edinburgh University’s medical research centre for regenerative medicine managed to rebuild the thymus of very old mice, re-establishing the health of the organ seen in younger creatures.

Scientists reactivated a natural mechanism that shuts down with age to rejuvenate the thymus, an organ near the heart that produces important infection-fighting white blood cells, called T cells.

By targeting a protein called FOXN1, which helps control how genes are switched on, the function of the thymus was restored. Treated mice began to make more T cells.

The research, published in the journal Development, found the thymus grew to twice its previous size, and the recovery appeared sustainable. Scientists now will look into any unintended consequences of increasing FOXN1.

The thymus is the first organ in the human body to deteriorate as we age, contributing to the declining capacity of older people to fight off new infections, such as flu.

The breakthrough may lead to treatments that could significantly elongate human life. But this would be many years away, given that the process has been tested only on mice.


Via Wildcat2030
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MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's curator insight, July 11, 2014 9:31 AM

 

CRM Prof Clare Blackburn, who led the research, said: “By targeting a single protein, we have been able to almost completely reverse age-related shrinking of the thymus. Our results suggest that targeting the same pathway in humans may improve thymus function and therefore boost immunity in elderly patients, or those with a suppressed immune system. However, before we test this in humans we need to carry out more work to make sure the process can be tightly controlled.”

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Kickstarter and the Bitcoin Climax | Keen On... - YouTube

Having raised over $37,000 on Kickstarter to make a TV show about the future of money, Heather Schlegel knows a thing or two about both social and financial ...
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BioEdge: Savulescu - We have a moral obligation to increase the intelligence of our children

BioEdge: Savulescu - We have a moral obligation to increase the intelligence of our children | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Oxford bioethicist Julian Savulescu calls for genetic screening of the unborn for IQ genes.

Via Yissar
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Hacking the GENOME of Flow: Jamie Wheal at TEDxVeniceBeach - YouTube

http://www.flowgenomeproject.co http://www.facebook.com/flowgenome The peak performance state known as Flow, of being "in the zone," where time slows down, e...
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From human extinction to super intelligence, two futurists explain

From human extinction to super intelligence, two futurists explain | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it

What do you think poses the greatest threat to humanity?

Sandberg: Natural risks are far smaller than human-caused risks. The typical mammalian species lasts for a few million years, which means that extinction risk is on the order of one in a million per year. Just looking at nuclear war, where we have had at least one close call in 69 years (the Cuban Missile Crisis) gives a risk of many times higher. Of course, nuclear war might not be 100% extinction causing, but even if we agree it has just 10% or 1% chance, it is still way above the natural extinction rate.

Nuclear war is still the biggest direct threat, but I expect biotechnology-related threats to increase in the near future (cheap DNA synthesis, big databases of pathogens, at least some crazies and misanthropes). Further along the line nanotechnology (not grey goo, but “smart poisons” and superfast arms races) and artificial intelligence might be really risky.

The core problem is a lot of overconfidence. When people are overconfident they make more stupid decisions, ignore countervailing evidence and set up policies that increase risk. So in a sense the greatest threat is human stupidity.


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Stephen Hawking: 'Transcendence looks at the implications of artificial intelligence - but are we taking AI seriously enough?'

Stephen Hawking: 'Transcendence looks at the implications of artificial intelligence - but are we taking AI seriously enough?' | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
With the Hollywood blockbuster Transcendence playing in cinemas, with Johnny Depp and Morgan Freeman showcasing clashing visions for the future of humanity, it's tempting to dismiss the notion of highly intelligent machines as mere science fiction. But this would be a mistake, and potentially our worst mistake in history.
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Why I stopped watching porn: Ran Gavrieli at TEDxJaffa 2013 - YouTube

Ran Gavrieli lives in Tel Aviv and studies gender at Tel Aviv University. He works with youth and adults all over the country in sex and gender studies and i...
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Studio XO

Studio XO | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Science meets style in this fashion laboratory as the boundaries of wearable tech are tested.
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Cybathlon Trailer - YouTube

To see update: Go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLHr99bp3VM CYBATHLON The Championship for Robot-Assisted Parathletes, Zurich, 8 October 2016 www.cybath...
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Americans Aren’t Ready for the Future Google and Amazon Want to Build | Business | WIRED

Americans Aren’t Ready for the Future Google and Amazon Want to Build | Business | WIRED | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A new study out of Pew Research Center shows how Americans view the future of tech and what they're not quite ready for.

 

Americans are hopeful about the future of technology. But don’t release the drones just yet. And forget meat grown in a petri dish.

Pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready can have real bottom-line consequences.

That’s the takeaway from a new study released by the Pew Research Center looking at how U.S. residents felt about possible high-tech advances looming in the not-too-distant future. Overall, a decisive majority of those surveyed believed new tech would make the future better. At the same time, the public doesn’t seem quite ready for many of the advances companies like Google and Amazon are pushing hard to make real.

If the stigma surrounding Google Glass (or, perhaps more specifically, “Glassholes”) has taught us anything, it’s that no matter how revolutionary technology may be, ultimately its success or failure ride on public perception. Many promising technological developments have died because they were ahead of their times. During a cultural moment when the alleged arrogance of some tech companies is creating a serious image problem, the risk of pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready could have real bottom-line consequences.


Via Wildcat2030, Yissar
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Meet the doctor who'll grow you a new nose (Wired UK)

Meet the doctor who'll grow you a new nose (Wired UK) | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
In a hospital in North-West London, noses, ears and windpipes lie disembodied in racks and on table tops
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Thomas Landrain - Biohacking: when biotech breaks free - YouTube

The future of biotech is maybe not where we expect it. The cost of innovation in traditional and institutional biotech is too high. Amateurs around the world...
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The Micro is a $200 3D printer that can make a teacup in an hour

The Micro is a $200 3D printer that can make a teacup in an hour | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
There are more than a couple of reasons why 3D printing hasn't truly hit critical mass, and the team at M3D thinks it's sidestepped them with The Micro,
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Ultra tiny camera has no lens – uses algorithm to develop pictures

Ultra tiny camera has no lens – uses algorithm to develop pictures | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —An extremely tiny lensless camera, developed by Rambus, has been slowly making waves over the past year. Researchers for the company, David Stork and Patrick Gill won a Best Paper award at last year's Sencomm 2013 for describing what the company has created. They spoke again at last month's ...
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