Embodied Zeitgeist
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Meet the new generation of robots. They're almost human…

Meet the new generation of robots. They're almost human… | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
In Bristol, Molly the robot helps the elderly; in Lyon, iCub plays children's games.
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Embodied Zeitgeist
Exploration of The Zeitgeist as embodied in Humans
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5 Amazing Robots 2016 - The Shape of Things to Come - Atlas, Spot, Cheetah, Pepper, ASIMO

5 Amazing Robots changing the world, these do things now you wont believe - Atlas, Spot, Cheetah, Pepper, ASIMO http://curious-droid.com/gbdl Atlas humanoi
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Pepper the 'emotional' humanoid becomes first robot to attend SCHOOL

Pepper the 'emotional' humanoid becomes first robot to attend SCHOOL | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Pepper, a robot that uses sensors to detect human emotions and can understand English and Japanese, has enrolled in Shoshi High School in Waseda, Fukushima, Japan.

Via Spaceweaver
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New 3D Printed Ovaries Allow Infertile Mice to Give Birth

New 3D Printed Ovaries Allow Infertile Mice to Give Birth | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it

Northwestern University scientists created a prosthetic ovary using a 3D printer – an implant that allowed mice that had their ovaries surgically removed to bear live young. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston. Researchers hope to use the technology to develop an ovary bioprosthesis that could be implanted in women to restore fertility. One group that could benefit is survivors of childhood cancers, who have an increased risk of infertility as adults. An estimated 1 in 250 adults has survived childhood cancer.

 

“One of the biggest concerns for patients diagnosed with cancer is how the treatment may affect their fertility and hormone health,” said lead study author Monica M. Laronda, PhD, a postdoctoral research fellow at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “We are developing new ways to restore their quality of life by engineering ovary bioprosthesis implants.”

 

The researchers used a 3D printer to create a scaffold to support hormone-producing cells and immature egg cells, called oocytes. The structure was made out of gelatin – a biological material derived from the animal protein collagen. The scientists applied biological principles to manufacture the scaffold, which needed to be rigid enough to be handled during surgery and to provide enough space for oocyte growth, blood vessel formation and ovulation.

 

Using human cell cultures, the researchers determined the optimal scaffold design should have crisscrossing struts that allowed the cells to anchor at multiple points. The scaffolds were seeded with ovarian follicles – the spherical unit that contains a centralized oocyte with surrounding supportive, hormone-producing cells – to create the bioprosthesis.

 

To test the implant, researchers removed the ovaries of mice and replaced them with the ovary bioprosthesis. Following the procedure, the mice ovulated, gave birth to healthy pups and were able to nurse.

 

Implanting the prosthetic ovary in mice also restored the estrous, or female hormone cycle. Researchers theorize a similar implant could help maintain hormone cycling in women who were born with or have undergone disease treatments that have reduced ovarian function. These women often experience decreased production of reproductive hormones that can cause issues with the onset of puberty as well as bone and vascular health problems later in life.

 

“We developed this implant with downstream human applications in mind, as it is made through a scalable 3D printing method, using a material already used in humans,” Laronda said. “We hope to one day restore fertility and hormone function in women who suffer from the side effects of cancer treatments or who were born with reduced ovarian function.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Interview: Paul Allen's artificial intelligence guru on the future of robots and humanity - GeekWire

Interview: Paul Allen's artificial intelligence guru on the future of robots and humanity - GeekWire | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence may seem like a futuristic concept, but we're already experiencing it in real ways in our lives, whether we know it or not — in are
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Human-Like Robot Interviewed at SXSW—It's Here to Help and Destroy [Video] - Singularity HUB

Human-Like Robot Interviewed at SXSW—It's Here to Help and Destroy [Video] - Singularity HUB | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Meet Sophia, a new human-like robot exhibited by Hanson Robotics at the SXSW festival. Sophia has a variety of features that make interactions with a human appear ordinary. Employing a... read more
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In debt, out of luck: why Generation K fell in love with The Hunger Games

In debt, out of luck: why Generation K fell in love with The Hunger Games | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The theme of rebellion in the dystopian fantasy – whose final instalment is about to hit cinemas – strikes a chord with teens and twentysomethings
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Kevin Kelly | 12 Inevitable Tech Forces That Will Shape Our Future | SXSW Interactive 2016

In a few years we’ll have artificial intelligence that can accomplish professional human tasks. There is nothing we can do to stop this. In addition ou
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Finland's hugely exciting experiment in basic income, explained

Finland's hugely exciting experiment in basic income, explained | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
It's the biggest test of basic income to date.
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Ben Dyson l Positive Money l Meaning 2014

Ben is the founder of Positive Money, a campaign for a banking system that works for society and not against it. At Meaning 2014 he got into the nitty gritty...
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WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST INTERESTING RECENT [SCIENTIFIC] NEWS? WHAT MAKES IT IMPORTANT? | Edge.org

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST INTERESTING RECENT [SCIENTIFIC] NEWS? WHAT MAKES IT IMPORTANT? | Edge.org | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
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The Most Notable Medical Findings of 2015 - The New Yorker

The Most Notable Medical Findings of 2015 - The New Yorker | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Jerome Groopman selects seven of this year’s most important findings from medicine and biology, including in the areas of C.P.R., cancer, and H.I.V./AIDS. 

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Chomsky was right, researchers find: We do have a 'grammar' in our head

Chomsky was right, researchers find: We do have a 'grammar' in our head | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A team of neuroscientists has found new support for MIT linguist Noam Chomsky's decades-old theory that we possess an "internal grammar" that allows us to comprehend even nonsensical phrases.

"One of the foundational elements of Chomsky's work is that we have a grammar in our head, which underlies our processing of language," explains David Poeppel, the study's senior researcher and a professor in New York University's Department of Psychology. "Our neurophysiological findings support this theory: we make sense of strings of words because our brains combine words into constituents in a hierarchical manner—a process that reflects an 'internal grammar' mechanism."

The research, which appears in the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, builds on Chomsky's 1957 work, Syntactic Structures (1957). It posited that we can recognize a phrase such as "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" as both nonsensical and grammatically correct because we have an abstract knowledge base that allows us to make such distinctions even though the statistical relations between words are non-existent.

Neuroscientists and psychologists predominantly reject this viewpoint, contending that our comprehension does not result from an internal grammar; rather, it is based on both statistical calculations between words and sound cues to structure. That is, we know from experience how sentences should be properly constructed—a reservoir of information we employ upon hearing words and phrases. Many linguists, in contrast, argue that hierarchical structure building is a central feature of language processing.

In an effort to illuminate this debate, the researchers explored whether and how linguistic units are represented in the brain during speech comprehension.

Via Wildcat2030
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Trying to Save the World From Climate Change Is Not Radical

Trying to Save the World From Climate Change Is Not Radical | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A group of 21 youth climate activists scored a major victory in the courts on Friday: The plaintiffs, aged 8 to 19, allege unconstitutional discrimination by a federal government more interested in burning fossil fuels than protecting the rights to life, liberty, and property of young people. The Oregon federal judge hearing the case, Thomas Coffin, said they have a point.

Denying the federal government’s motion to dismiss the “relatively unprecedented lawsuit,” Judge Coffin wrote:

The court must accept the allegations as true and those allegations plausibly allege harm, though widespread, that is concrete. … the intractability of the debates before Congress and state legislatures and the alleged valuing of short term economic interest despite the cost to human life, necessitates a need for the courts to evaluate the constitutional parameters of the action or inaction taken by the government.

In other words, given the ultra-polarized political stalemate on climate change, a bunch of kids suing the government over decades of unnecessarily slow action may be the best shot humanity has left at addressing the problem before dangerous changes are locked in. The suit is a radical challenge to the status quo in an era of radical environmental change.

“The future of our generation is at stake,” said 16-year-old plaintiff Victoria Barrett in a statement. “People label our generation as dreamers, but hope is not the only tool we have.”

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Watch Google X Unleash an Awesome Two-Legged Robot on Tokyo

Watch Google X Unleash an Awesome Two-Legged Robot on Tokyo | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
It’s been a little over two years since Google jumped into robotics with both feet. In 2013, the company (since reorganized as Alphabet) bought eight of the most interesting robotics... read more
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Brain scans reveal how LSD affects consciousness

Brain scans reveal how LSD affects consciousness | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Drugs researcher David Nutt discusses brain-imaging studies with hallucinogens.
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Why We Should Teach Kids to Code Biology, Not Just Software

Why We Should Teach Kids to Code Biology, Not Just Software | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Almost ten years ago, Freeman Dyson ventured a wild forecast:  “I predict that the domestication of biotechnology will dominate our lives during the next fifty years at least as much... read more
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Is the Brain’s Awareness of the World All or Nothing? - Singularity HUB

Is the Brain’s Awareness of the World All or Nothing? - Singularity HUB | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
We often think of consciousness as binary: you’re either fully aware of something, or you’re not. Yet according to a team of cognitive neuroscientists at the University of California, Santa... read more
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A programming language for living cells

A programming language for living cells | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
MIT biological engineers have created a programming language that allows them to rapidly design complex, DNA-encoded circuits that give new functions to living cells.
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Journal of Information Technology - Big other: surveillance capitalism and the prospects of an information civilization

Journal of Information Technology - Big other: surveillance capitalism and the prospects of an information civilization | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The Journal of Information Technology is of interest to academics, scholars, advanced students and reflective practitioners in management science, information systems and computer science disciplines. The journal will also inform those seeking an update on current experience and future prospects in the areas of contemporary information and communications technology.
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Google's AlphaGo A.I. Defeats World Champion At The Game of Go

Google's AlphaGo A.I. Defeats World Champion At The Game of Go | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The boundaries for what machines cannot do has been pushed a little farther, as Google DeepMind's AlphaGo has beaten Go world champion Lee Se-dol in the first of five matches.

After a 3 1/2 hour game, Se-dol conceded to the computer.

This is only the first match, but Se-dol expected a 5-0 sweep on his part. During a press conference after the match, Se-dol hung his head.

“I didn’t know AlphaGo would play such a perfect game,” he said.

Demis Hassabis, founder and CEO of DeepMind, compared this win to landing on the moon in a tweet after the match was called.

Via Spaceweaver
Xaos's insight:
A huge win to humanity - overcoming itself ! Let's see how it goes...
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, March 9, 2:32 PM
A huge win to humanity - overcoming itself ! Let's see how it goes...
Ben van Lier's curator insight, March 10, 4:51 PM
A huge win to humanity - overcoming itself ! Let's see how it goes...
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The State Of Robotics For 2015

The State Of Robotics For 2015 | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
While faulty hoverboards are setting themselves ablaze to celebrate Christmas, robots are gradually moving from labs to news reports to entering our daily..
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Termites Are Teaching Architects to Design Super-Efficient Skyscrapers

Termites Are Teaching Architects to Design Super-Efficient Skyscrapers | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it

Mound termites are pros at building self-regulating homes. Human architects want to get in on the action.


Via Spaceweaver
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