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Cory Doctorow on Singularity 1 on 1: The Singularity Is A Progressive Apocalypse

Cory Doctorow on Singularity 1 on 1: The Singularity Is A Progressive Apocalypse | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Want to find out why Cory Doctorow thinks the technological singularity is a progressive apocalypse? Watch his Singularity 1 on 1 interview to find out!
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luiy's curator insight, April 4, 2013 5:14 PM

Who is Cory Doctorow?

 

Cory Doctorow is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblogBoing Boing, and a contributor to The Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Senior Lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

 

His novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their re-use and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. He has won the Locus and Sunburst Awards, and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula and British Science Fiction Awards. His New York Times Bestseller Little Brother was published in May 2008. A sequel, Homeland, will be published in 2013, and another young adult novel, Pirate Cinema will precede it in October 2012. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, called Context (with an introduction by Tim O’Reilly) and IDW published a collection of comic books inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow’s Futuristic Tales Of The Here And Now. His latest adult novel is Makers, published by Tor Books/HarperCollins UK in October, 2009. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011.

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The State Of Robotics For 2015

The State Of Robotics For 2015 | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
While faulty hoverboards are setting themselves ablaze to celebrate Christmas, robots are gradually moving from labs to news reports to entering our daily..
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Termites Are Teaching Architects to Design Super-Efficient Skyscrapers

Termites Are Teaching Architects to Design Super-Efficient Skyscrapers | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it

Mound termites are pros at building self-regulating homes. Human architects want to get in on the action.


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Sting's Child Eliot Sumner: I Don't Identify With Either Gender

Sting's Child Eliot Sumner: I Don't Identify With Either Gender | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The musician has been dating Austrian model Lucie Von Alten for two years.
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What Makes Our Brains Special?

What Makes Our Brains Special? | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The human brain is unique: Our remarkable cognitive capacity has allowed us to invent the wheel, build the pyramids and land on the moon. In fact, scientists sometimes refer to the human brain as the “crowning achievement of evolution.”

But what, exactly, makes our brains so special? Some leading arguments have been that our brains have more neurons and expend more energy than would be expected for our size, and that our cerebral cortex, which is responsible for higher cognition, is disproportionately large—accounting for over 80 percent of our total brain mass.

Suzana Herculano-Houzel, a neuroscientist at the Institute of Biomedical Science in Rio de Janeiro, debunked these well-established beliefs in recent years when she discovered a novel way of counting neurons—dissolving brains into a homogenous mixture, or “brain soup.” Using this technique she found the number of neurons relative to brain size to be consistent with other primates, and that the cerebral cortex, the region responsible for higher cognition, only holds around 20 percent of all our brain’s neurons, a similar proportion found in other mammals. In light of these findings, she argues that the human brain is actually just a linearly scaled-up primate brain that grew in size as we started to consume more calories, thanks to the advent of cooked food.

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Between Science and Art – Logic of Nature by Artist J.D. Doria | OEN

Between Science and Art – Logic of Nature by Artist J.D. Doria | OEN | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A selection of fantastic paintings titled "Logic of Nature" by Tel Aviv-based Artist J.D. Doria that are intuitive, but also backed by scientific and
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Robot revolution: rise of 'thinking' machines could exacerbate inequality

Robot revolution: rise of 'thinking' machines could exacerbate inequality | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A “robot revolution” will transform the global economy over the next 20 years, cutting the costs of doing business but exacerbating social inequality, as machines take over everything from caring for the elderly to flipping burgers, according to a new study.

As well as robots performing manual jobs, such as hoovering the living room or assembling machine parts, the development of artificial intelligence means computers are increasingly able to “think”, performing analytical tasks once seen as requiring human judgment.

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Connecting the World's Poorest Is the Best Hope for Ending Poverty

Connecting the World's Poorest Is the Best Hope for Ending Poverty | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Last month the World Bank published new global poverty estimates. They confirm that the last 25 years represent an auspicious moment in the annals of human progress. A target to cut the rate of extreme poverty in half over this period was achieved seven years ahead of schedule. Preliminary final accounts show a reduction of over 70 percent. A new goal to finish the job by eradicating extreme poverty over the next 15 years has now been endorsed by the UN. To understand how this might be achieved, we must first recognize that the lives of the poor are fundamentally changing: We’re witnessing the end of marginalization thanks to the connections made possible by digital networks.

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Creating a culture of collaborative innovation | Claire Madden | TEDxQUT - YouTube

What will workplaces look like when the most material endowed, technologically literate, formally educated, and globally connected generations reach employme...
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Slavoj Žižek on Obama, Bernie, sex and democracy: “That’s the reality of global capitalism. Everyone is violating the rules”

Slavoj Žižek on Obama, Bernie, sex and democracy: “That’s the reality of global capitalism. Everyone is violating the rules” | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Salon exclusive q-and-a: "When voters really do have a choice, it’s usually perceived as a crisis of democracy"
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Design at the intersection of technology and biology

Design at the intersection of technology and biology | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Designer and architect Neri Oxman is leading the search for ways in which digital fabrication technologies can interact with the biological world. Working at the intersection of computational design, additive manufacturing, materials engineering and synthetic biology, her lab is pioneering a new age of symbiosis between microorganisms, our bodies, our products and even our buildings.
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Climate change is happening. Here's how we adapt

Climate change is happening. Here's how we adapt | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Imagine the hottest day you've ever experienced. Now imagine it's six, 10 or 12 degrees hotter. According to climate researcher Alice Bows-Larkin, that's the type of future in store for us if we don't significantly cut our greenhouse gas emissions now. She suggests that it's time we do things differently—a whole system change, in fact—and seriously consider trading economic growth for climate stability.
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WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST INTERESTING RECENT [SCIENTIFIC] NEWS? WHAT MAKES IT IMPORTANT? | Edge.org

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST INTERESTING RECENT [SCIENTIFIC] NEWS? WHAT MAKES IT IMPORTANT? | Edge.org | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
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The Most Notable Medical Findings of 2015 - The New Yorker

The Most Notable Medical Findings of 2015 - The New Yorker | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Jerome Groopman selects seven of this year’s most important findings from medicine and biology, including in the areas of C.P.R., cancer, and H.I.V./AIDS. 

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Chomsky was right, researchers find: We do have a 'grammar' in our head

Chomsky was right, researchers find: We do have a 'grammar' in our head | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A team of neuroscientists has found new support for MIT linguist Noam Chomsky's decades-old theory that we possess an "internal grammar" that allows us to comprehend even nonsensical phrases.

"One of the foundational elements of Chomsky's work is that we have a grammar in our head, which underlies our processing of language," explains David Poeppel, the study's senior researcher and a professor in New York University's Department of Psychology. "Our neurophysiological findings support this theory: we make sense of strings of words because our brains combine words into constituents in a hierarchical manner—a process that reflects an 'internal grammar' mechanism."

The research, which appears in the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, builds on Chomsky's 1957 work, Syntactic Structures (1957). It posited that we can recognize a phrase such as "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" as both nonsensical and grammatically correct because we have an abstract knowledge base that allows us to make such distinctions even though the statistical relations between words are non-existent.

Neuroscientists and psychologists predominantly reject this viewpoint, contending that our comprehension does not result from an internal grammar; rather, it is based on both statistical calculations between words and sound cues to structure. That is, we know from experience how sentences should be properly constructed—a reservoir of information we employ upon hearing words and phrases. Many linguists, in contrast, argue that hierarchical structure building is a central feature of language processing.

In an effort to illuminate this debate, the researchers explored whether and how linguistic units are represented in the brain during speech comprehension.

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Scientists Just Grew Wires Inside Roses

Scientists Just Grew Wires Inside Roses | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The wired rose leaf can be darkened or lightened with a zap of electricity.
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We, the people, are the system | Birgitta Jónsdóttir | TEDxReykjavik

Birgitta, a poetician and a pirate, shares her view on the future of democracy, in which the people are the motor of politics and progress, not institutions....
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Warming set to breach 1C threshold - BBC News

Warming set to breach 1C threshold - BBC News | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Global temperatures are set to rise more than one degree above pre-industrial levels according to the UK's Met Office.

Figures from January to September this year are already 1.02C above the average between 1850 and 1900.

If temperatures remain as predicted, 2015 will be the first year to breach this key threshold.

The world would then be half way towards 2C, the gateway to dangerous warming.

The new data is certain to add urgency to political negotiations in Paris later this month aimed at securing a new global climate treaty.
Difficult to measure

For researchers, confusion about the true level of temperatures in the 1750s, when the industrial revolution began and fossil fuels became widely used, means that an accurate assessment of the amount the world has warmed since then is very difficult.

To get over this problem, the Met Office use an average of the temperatures recorded between 1850 and 1900, which they argue makes their analysis more accurate.

Their latest temperature information comes from a dataset jointly run by the Met Office and the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia.

The HadCRUT database showed that in the first nine months of this year, the global mean temperature had just gone above 1C, hitting 1.02 with a error factor of plus or minus 0.11C.

Scientists say that the one degree mark will be broken in 2015 because of a combination of carbon emissions and the impact of the El Nino weather phenomenon.

"We have seen a strong El Nino develop in the Tropical Pacific this year and that will have had some impact on this year's global temperature," said Stephen Belcher, director of the Met Office Hadley Centre.

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Baby girl is first in the world to be treated with 'designer immune cells'

Baby girl is first in the world to be treated with 'designer immune cells' | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
A baby girl with aggressive leukaemia has become the first in the world to be treated with designer immune cells that were genetically engineered to wipe out her cancer.

The one-year-old, Layla Richards, was given months to live after conventional treatments failed to eradicate the disease, but she is now cancer free and doing well, a response one doctor described as “almost a miracle”.

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Gartner identifies the top 10 strategic IT technology trends for 2016 | KurzweilAI

Gartner identifies the top 10 strategic IT technology trends for 2016 | KurzweilAI | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Top 10 strategic trends 2016 (credit: Gartner, Inc.) At the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo today (Oct. 8), Gartner, Inc. highlighted the top 10 technology trends

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Elizabeth Parrish, CEO of BioViva, Claims to Undergo Anti-Aging Therapy | MIT Technology Review

Elizabeth Parrish, CEO of BioViva, Claims to Undergo Anti-Aging Therapy | MIT Technology Review | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
An American biotech CEO claims she is the first to undergo gene therapy to reverse aging. Judge for yourself.
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First 'in womb' stem cell trial to begin - BBC News

First 'in womb' stem cell trial to begin - BBC News | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The first clinical trial injecting foetal stem cells into babies still in the womb has been announced.

It is hoped the cells, which are able to transform into a range of tissues, will lessen symptoms of incurable brittle bone disease.

The trial, starting in January, will be led by Sweden's Karolinska Institute and in the UK by Great Ormond Street Hospital.

The stem cells will come from terminated pregnancies.

Brittle bone disease, officially called osteogenesis imperfecta, affects around one in every 25,000 births.

It can be fatal with babies born with multiple fractures. Even those who survive face up to 15 bone fractures a year, brittle teeth, impaired hearing and growth problems.

It is caused by errors in the developing baby's DNA -­ their blueprint of life -­ that mean the collagen supposed to give bone its structure is either missing or of poor quality.

The donated stem cells should provide the correct instructions for growing bone.

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Sherry Turkle’s ‘Reclaiming Conversation’

Sherry Turkle’s ‘Reclaiming Conversation’ | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
Jonathan Franzen reviews a new book based on interviews with people who say they feel controlled by new technologies.
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The Martian got me cheering, but why go to Mars?

The Martian got me cheering, but why go to Mars? | Embodied Zeitgeist | Scoop.it
The latest of the spate of recent space films may be the brightest, but it doesn't inspire this author to head to the Red Planet.
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