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Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from Using Educational Technology for Adult ELT
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» Lesson Plan: What is happiness? ELT Bakery

» Lesson Plan: What is happiness? ELT Bakery | ELT | Scoop.it
RT @eltbakery: EFL Video Lesson - What's Happiness?

Via Rita Simons Santiago
Maria Eva Blaiotta's insight:

"What is happiness?" Listen to random people answering the question. Also, psychologist Emma Kenny and Dr. Sam Thompson express their views on the benefits which happy individuals bring to society.

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Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from ELT Challenges
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An ELT Notebook: Using the L1 in the EFL Classroom

An ELT Notebook: Using the L1 in the EFL Classroom | ELT | Scoop.it

Via Roselink, Teresa Carvalho
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Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Fotopedia Reporter - Featured

Fotopedia Reporter - Featured | ELT | Scoop.it

Fotopedia Reporter, we're all reporters.


Via Nik Peachey
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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:43 AM

It is, indeed! A catchy way to enhance narrative and descriptive writing

Mary A. Axford's curator insight, September 25, 2013 9:15 AM

Some great visuals... might indeed be useful for student assignments.

Mike Dilger's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:59 AM

Could be a useful resource.  Japanese section would be useful for cultural program and other subjects such as Science could use the Science focus articles.  The "Everyone is a Reporter" aspect could be adapted for real world writing but it would need to be set up and explored for student suitability.

Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from IT Books Free Share
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The Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition - Free eBook Share

The Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition - Free eBook Share | ELT | Scoop.it
eBook Free Download: The Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition | PDF, EPUB | ISBN: 1107007712 | 2013-02-25 | English | PutLocker

Via Fox eBook
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Fox eBook's curator insight, August 19, 2013 9:05 PM

The Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition (Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics)
What is language and how can we investigate its acquisition by children or adults? What perspectives exist from which to view acquisition? What internal constraints and external factors shape acquisition? What are the properties of interlanguage systems? This comprehensive 31-chapter handbook is an authoritative survey of second language acquisition (SLA). Its multi-perspective synopsis on recent developments in SLA research provides significant contributions by established experts and widely recognized younger talent. It covers cutting edge and emerging areas of enquiry not treated elsewhere in a single handbook, including third language acquisition, electronic communication, incomplete first language acquisition, alphabetic literacy and SLA, affect and the brain, discourse and identity. Written to be accessible to newcomers as well as experienced scholars of SLA, the Handbook is organised into six thematic sections, each with an editor-written introduction.

Table of Contents

Part I Theory and practice
1 Theories of language from a critical perspective
2 History of the study of second language acquisition
3 Theoretical approaches
4 Scope and research methodologies

Part II Internal ingredients
5 The role of the native language
6 Learning mechanisms and automatization
7 Generative approaches and the poverty of the stimulus
8 Learner-internal psychological factors
9 Alphabetic literacy and adult SLA

Part III External ingredients
10 Negotiated input and output/interaction
11 Second language identity construction
12 Socialization
13 Variation
14 Electronic interaction and resources

Part IV Biological factors
15 Age-related effects
16 Childhood second language acquisition
17 Incomplete L1 acquisition
18 Third language acquisition
19 Language processing
20 Affect and the brain

Part V Properties of interlanguage systems
21 The lexicon
22 Semantics
23 Discourse and pragmatics
24 Morphosyntax
25 Phonology and speech

Part VI Models of development
26 Explaining change in transition grammars
27 Stagelike development and Organic Grammar
28 Emergentism, connectionism and complexity
29 Input, input processing and focus on form
30 Sociocultural theory and the zone of proximal development
31 Nativelike and non-nativelike attainment

Appendix Examples of structured input activities

 

Free Download Here: http://www.foxebook.net/the-cambridge-handbook-of-second-language-acquisition/

Semra Yilmaz-Ozturk's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:19 AM

inspirational and through

Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from Using Educational Technology for Adult ELT
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How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic

How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic | ELT | Scoop.it

You can now easily integrate Bloom's Taxonomy into the teaching of critical thinking skills in your classroom using a fabulously simple chart! (I think this will be useful for designing assessments. via @Edudemic: Teaching Crit.


Via Rita Simons Santiago
Maria Eva Blaiotta's insight:

Integrating Bloom's Taxonomy in the classroom.

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Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from EFL-ESL, ELT, Education | Language - Learning - Teaching - Educating
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Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | ELT | Scoop.it

Via Monica Mirza
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Monica Mirza's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:04 PM

"The 2013 Best Websites for Teaching and Learning foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration. They are free, Web-based sites that are user friendly and encourage a community of learners to explore and discover."

Rescooped by Maria Eva Blaiotta from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Language learning begins in the womb

Language learning begins in the womb | ELT | Scoop.it
Scientists show that learning starts from the fetus and that speech stimuli might help to improve language acquisition later on in life.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

Anew study by a Finnish research group has shown that speech can affect the development of neural networks before birth and have a positive effect on language acquisition. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that auditory stimuli during pregnancy can have a significant effect on the ability of the infant to accurately discriminate language changes and potentially compensate for genetic abnormalities such as dyslexia and language impairment.

Learning, the process of building knowledge or skills through experience or study, is the result of continuous development of brain neurons and their interactions with each other. Several external stimuli can affect the learning process which starts even before birth, when humans are still embryos, possibly at week 29 during infancy. Newborns’ cry melody, for example, is influenced by the native language of the parents. Scientists know that, as long as we are born, we have an innatepreference to listening to speech rather than complex non-speech analogues. However, how newborns can detect changes in auditory stimuli and how the neuronal networks in the brain are affected is still a mystery.

To investigate this, a group of researchers in Finland led by Professor Minna Huotilainen, played the sound of a trisyllabic word (tatata) in three different ways to the infants of Finnish women from week 29 of pregnancy until birth. First, the word “tatata”, which does not mean anything in Finnish, was played as is without any change, second with a vowel change (tatota); and third with a pitch change, slightly differing the pronunciation of the middle syllable (tatata). The selection of these modifications was not random; in Finnish, pitch changes seldom happen, contrary to the frequent vowel changes. Therefore, the research team could evaluate how well the infants were trained in discriminating language changes.

http://blogs.blouinnews.com/blouinbeatsciencehealth/2013/09/12/language-learning-begins-in-the-womb/

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Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author S...
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