Elizabethan era newspaper
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Elizabethan era newspaper
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All That is Needed to be Known About the Recent Wars and Weapons

As you, the reader, may know now, the Spanish and their mighty armada have been challenged and defeated by the forces of England. This war started in 1585 when tensions started rising between our state and that of Spain surrounding differences in our Protestant religion and their catholic. Another cause was that Spain and England both wanted wealth and power from the New World. The war ended officially in 1603 after a long nineteen years. The war ended when Elizabeth I died in 1603 and King James I took power. It is hard to say who actually won the war, but with the English victory over the Spanish armada in 1588, more could argue that England won. But there was another war going on at about the same time.
The Tyrone Rebellion, or the Nine Years War, ended in 1603 as well. It started when the Irish were outraged by the increased power of the English settlers in the Irish province of Ulster. Then, the Earl of Tyrone, Hugh O’Neill, led the rebellion against the English (Tyrone is a county located in Ulster, in Northern Ireland). The Irish also hated the Protestant religion of the English and preferred the Catholic religion like Spain. Because Spain and the Irish in Ulster both were Catholic and hated Protestants, King Philip of Spain helped them. Although in 1601 the English suffered a horrible defeat at the hands of the Irish, they surrendered to King James I in 1603, one week after Queen Elizabeth I died. Now let’s take a look at some of the weapons used by the English.
Arms called muskets are now revolutionizing warfare permanently. These are long tubes of wood that use gunpowder to propel a small metal ball towards the target at a lethal speed, much more effective than standard bows and arrows but not quite as efficient. Countries throughout Europe are using muskets. But, despite this, traditional blades are still being used. Maces, daggers, broadswords, swords and war axes are still being used. Another very popular weapon is the rapier; a thin sword used mostly as a fashion accessory for the wealthy but nonetheless a weapon. I cannot wait to see when new inventions like muskets start appearing and revolutionize warfare. Hail the King!
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Recent Arrests

Recent Arrests | Elizabethan era newspaper | Scoop.it
Recent Major Arrests released.

Edward Ackworth, apothecary, has been arrested for the murder of William Chilton by means of poison. Edward confessed while constrained in the rack. As told by him, William had owed him money for Willow Bark Tea from the store and should have paid him back by now. No records of any transactions have been found. William had invited Edward to his house to discuss the matter. Edward then took the opportunity to poison William while eating lunch. He slipped the poison into the red wine of the victim when he was not present to witness it. The type of poison used was not released, however, Edward has access to many various poisons. Edward Ackworth was sentenced to the death penalty by a public hanging in the gallows at Tyburn, London on October 30, 1616.

Alice Greene has committed theft from the blacksmith, Ralph Maycott on the night of October 12th. Alice was caught stealing food to try and feed her family. Alice has told us that she has not been able to feed her children since her husband passed away last January. Ralph had heard a noise downstairs and woke suddenly. He sneaked downstairs and caught Alice by surprise and reported her. Alice was sentenced to an exposure in the local pillory at some point later this week.

At the beginning of October Henry Seymour was convicted of begging on the streets. Many people reported accounts of public disturbance by Henry. The most recent report was on October 2nd on the streets of Thame. Henry will be beaten until reaching the stones that marked the town line. The beating will take place next week.
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ARM YOURSELF!

ARM YOURSELF! | Elizabethan era newspaper | Scoop.it
Cut down all of your enemies with our pristine metal weaponry. We sell is all at competitive prices from maces to shields. Come on by Ye' Olde Blacksmith in downtown London today and arm yourself!
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Fashion

Fashion | Elizabethan era newspaper | Scoop.it
What You Need to Know:

Sleeves:
The hottest ways to wear your sleeves are a slashed sleeve or a puffed sleeve. Also, a very puffed-out sleeve, ending in a deep elbow, with a detachable tight, wrist-length under sleeve is a great way to change up any outfit! You might also like to have a slit down the front to expose the chemise sleeve (wings would look great with this look!).

Bodices:
Bodices with low necks are becoming as popular as the stand collar! You must buy one of these! They are often worn with a stomacher. If you are not aware of what a stomacher is, it is a triangular, stiffened centre to the bodice, which it is either tied or pinned to. Your stomacher should be a different color than your bodice, but should most definitely match either the sleeves or forepart of the skirt to add a a little something to your outfit.

Jackets:
Go out to the store right now and get yourself a linen jacket! They're becoming more and more popular by the second. You can replace your bodice with it because it is quilted for warmth. This way you don't have to wear your bodice everyday, you can switch between your jacket and your bodice. the sleeves are tight, but flare at the wrist to make the jacket pop! I'm sure you're wondering, "what will I ever wear that with?" Well, they pair great with a loose skirt because the waistline is straight with a small flared skirt.


What's Not Hot?

Men: Your armor is not in style anymore! So stop wearing it! As an alternative, go out and have some dress armor made for you, because the armor just isn't working anymore. The dress armor often has a jerkin with a molded leather bodice and puff sleeves.
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Shakespeare Dies: A Review Of His Life

Shakespeare Dies: A Review Of His Life | Elizabethan era newspaper | Scoop.it
Sir William Shakespeare was born on the 23rd of April in the spring if 1564. He was one of many brothers and sisters, though many died at a young age. Many of us citizens know him for his outstanding plays and poems, but there is much more to his life. He was born in Stratford-on-Avon, a small town in England. He attended a local school as a child and later on he married Anne Hathaway at 18, although she was much older than he. They made a family with three children, but William always longed to be a part in the theatre. With this ambition in mind, he left his family at home and joined a traveling acting company. Within time, he began to write his own poems. By 1599 he owned a part of his own acting company, The Lord Chamberlain's Men (only men were allowed to act). Later that year his company opened up in the Globe Theatre near London. Though the theatre was common for the time, his plays were special. While other plays were based on chance rather than choices, his plays showed a more human side of the theatre. They were enveloped in plots surrounding flaws, choices, and good qualities all the same. He wrote plays like Romeo and Juliette, which were tragedies. Others were comedies like A Mid-Summer Night's Dream. He made his words say exactly what he wanted them to, in a sort of beat or rhythm. Even when he could not seem to find the right word, he would make one up, like the word leapfrog. In his lifetime he had written 37 plays and more than 100 poems. His writings gave a massive and lasting impact on the world that we live in. In 1607 he inherited his day's house and lived there with his sisters. He bought many acres of land and showed a great interest in his community. Unfortunately, he recently died on his birthday in 1616.
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