Elena Ortés
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Una estrategia de comunicación, vacuna frente a los rumores

Una estrategia de comunicación, vacuna frente a los rumores | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Disponer de un plan de crisis, que los profesionales de la salud participen en la Red y contar con argumentos científicos sólidos para defenderse son la mejor estrategia para contrarrestar los rumores de salud en Internet, según diversos expertos consultados por COM Salud.


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Are You Using Social Media to Build Your Medical Practice?

Are You Using Social Media to Build Your Medical Practice? | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

How many times have you dragged yourself to a cocktail party after a 15-hour day examining patients? You’re ready to trade your lab coat for a fuzzy flannel robe, but instead, you’re suiting up for an evening of small talk and cheese balls.

As a physician and a businessman, you know the value of networking. To grow your practice, forge relationships with other doctors and build your reputation, you’ve got to do more than treat illnesses and set broken bones.

 

Developing efficient ways to network and communicate with peers and patients will become even more important in the months and years ahead thanks to the Affordable Health-care Act. The law’s emphasis on preventive care and the anticipated crush of newly insured patients will require a lot of proactive, efficient outreach if you want to be as effective as possible.

 

Of course, I know you don’t rely solely on professional gatherings and social get-togethers to connect with others. You’re also online, with a personal Facebook page and a nice website for your practice. You just don’t have the time or manpower to do more.

It’s time to rethink that. I promise you, an hour of virtual networking – at home in your bathrobe and slippers! – is more valuable than 12 spent watching cocktail wieners drown in barbecue sauce.

 

While 87 percent of physicians use social media in their personal lives – everything from Facebook, to Twitter, to blogs and YouTube – only 26 percent use two or more sites for connecting professionally, according to a 2011 QuantiaMD survey of more than 4,000 doctors. The most popular sites for docsare physician communities, which 28 percent of you use to discuss medical issues, learn about new therapies, and share information through links to articles.

 

That means a lot of you are missing out on a wealth of opportunities. Consider: Unlike the rest of us, you’re practically guaranteed an audience because people tend to trust what physicians post (61% percent of patients surveyed by PwC Health Research Institute). That audience can grow exponentially online, and that translates to tremendous credibility in the public eye. For better or for worse, in today’s world we’re judged by the size of our online following.

 

What can that mean for your practice? If you’re a specialist, patients all over the country and beyond can get to know you and come to trust in your expertise. Will they travel to confer with the physician they know? Oh, yes!

 

Even if you’re only interested in building your practice locally, having an online reputation as a knowledgeable, helpful physician will lead to more patients and more referrals. People often choose doctors through word-of-mouth recommendations, and thousands of Twitter followers is some impressive word-of-mouth!

 

As for helping you deal with the changes expected as a result of the Affordable Health-care Act? More patients and a focus on preventive health care will require you to turn your one-on-one office visit reminders, precautions and advice into mass messages. Some physicians already are experimenting with targeting email blasts to groups of patients with the same concerns or chronic illnesses, e.g. “Have you scheduled your mammogram?” or “Have you heard about this new technique for averting an asthma attack?”

 

Social media allows you to alert large numbers of patients – and others who are interested – to new therapies, preventive lifestyle changes, checkup reminders and other valuable health information.

But before I move on to suggestions for which sites will be most helpful to you and tips for using them, a word of caution. The American Medical Association and the Federation of State Medical Boards have both issued guidelines to help you avoid censure, awkward situations and conflicts of interest caused by posting the wrong content online.

The AMA policy warns physicians not to post any identifiable patient information to avoid federal privacy violations. The FSMB policy further refines that: No photos of patients, no mentioning room numbers, no referring to patients by code names.

 

Both also remind clinicians to separate personal and professional sites. Don’t use your personal Facebook page, where you interact with friends and family, to connect with patients and former patients. When creating log-ins for personal sites, use your personal email address. If you use your professional email, people may assume you’re representing yourself online in that capacity.

 

Doctors also have inadvertently overstepped ethical boundaries of their patient-physician relationships by becoming friends and followers of their patients’ sites, and allowing them access to their personal sites. The FSMB policy includes descriptions of scenarios that have resulted from a patient seeing photos of her doctor partying it up late at night – and wondering if he was sober during their early-morning appointments – to a psychiatrist unsure what to do about a former patient’s worrisome posts.

 

A graceful way to handle requests from patients and former patients who ask to connect with you through your personal accounts is to refer them to your professional sites.

 

Most important, remember that everything you post online is now published for the world to see: The disparaging comment about a colleague; the innocent, off-color joke; the irritation over a patient’s behavior.

 

All that said, developing an online presence really is not so scary. At my company, EMSI, we simply remind the physicians and other health-care professionals who are clients not to do or say anything online that they wouldn’t at that networking cocktail party.

 

Now, on to the fun stuff. There are three ways you can handle your social media: Do it yourself; have someone in your office take care of it with your oversight; or have a PR company take care of it. With the latter, there are many different models. Our company employs social media experts who “become” the client, learning their voice, their message, their likes and dislikes. While they take care of posting content, responding to comments and questions, and building the audience, they do so while in constant communication and coordination with our client.

I’d also advise you to look for firms that have experience working with health-care professionals. We felt comfortable taking on doctors as clients when we launched our social media division five years ago, because we’d been working with doctors since we went into business 22 years ago.

 

If you plan the DIY approach, you’ll want to choose at least two networking sites – more is better! – for your professional accounts. We like the four most popular – Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn – although you have many, many other options. There are also physician communities, such as Doximity (www.doximity.com) with 567,000 members, which are accessible only by doctors. These offer you a measure of freedom to tackle concerns and problems, and they’re an excellent educational resource.

 

Here’s a brief description of the four big networking sites:

 

Facebook – Facebook is the largest social network in the world. Your content is provided through fairly brief “status updates,” such as: “It’s flu season, have you been vaccinated? It’s a simple way to prevent a week of misery and time away from work. Have concerns? Here’s a link to a great article laying out the truths and myths about flu vaccinations.” You can also share photos, videos and online resources.

 

Twitter – With Twitter, you communicate in posts of no more than 140 characters – a sentence or two. You can share links, get involved in conversations, and access different topic categories, by using hashtags (i.e. #asthma) to see, for instance, the concerns of people living with asthma. Users “follow” each other and thus gain access to their messages. You can also respond directly to individual users, although these will be displayed publicly.

 

Google+ – Google+ is a combination of Facebook and Twitter, a social network that allows you to separate the people you share content with by placing them in circles, such as friends, colleagues, acquaintances. You can use it for one-on-one conversations

 

LinkedIn – Used primarily for building a professional network, LinkedIn allows you to share your CV, have colleagues post recommendations, see the professionals your contacts are associated with and hold discussions. It’s a great way to get introduced to someone you’d like to connect with but don’t know. LinkedIn has more than 70 million registered users.

 

Assuming you’re going to handle your social media yourself, here are some tips from our experts at EMSI.

Be sure to fill out your profile with accurate, complete information about you, your credentials and your practice. Don’t use the shadowy profile picture most platforms provide as a default. Instead upload a professional photo of you (we prefer a face because people like to follow people) or your business logo.People will follow you only if your content is informative or entertaining so don’t use your site simply to advertise your practice or services. If you want to build an audience, give people content they can use.Respond to comments and questions in a timely fashion. It can be as simple as a “thank you.” If you don’t respond, your followers will quickly realize no one’s really “there” and they’ll quit coming back. (If they ask for a diagnosis, talk in general terms about their symptoms, i.e. Localized rashes are often caused by non-threatening allergic reactions. Try not to scratch; Benadryl ointment may help. If it spreads, you should see your doctor.)Look for helpful, timely news stories to link to, such as new medical studies. When posting a link to an article, don’t simply post the link. Add a personal comment, such as, “This is an interesting new weight-loss study that should help anyone who hates dieting.” People can find those articles themselves – what they value is your take on them.Know that when you first launch your social media account, your audience will grow slowly. But as your audience grows, your site is exposed to more and more people – each person who friends, likes, or connects with you is also sharing your content with their friends. Be patient. If you want to add followers more quickly, find relevant interest groups and add your comments to their conversations.On Twitter, follow nearly as many people as the number following you. It’s all about sharing. If people see you don’t subscribe to other accounts, they won’t subscribe to yours. Everyone wants followers!Photographs always draw attention – people love visuals! While physicians need to be careful about personal information, your followers willl enjoy the occasional family vacation photo or cute pet picture. Plus, it shows your human side. And that’s what you need to do to attract followers.

So what’s the takeaway? Social media is the present and the future of marketing.  If you don’t already have a presence, now is the time to start building one. It’s how relationships, credibility and practices are taken to new heights.

Patients may eat an apple a day to keep the doctor away.  But a Tweet a day will keep your practice healthy.


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Allison Emma Schizkoske's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:45 PM

This article had great insight and great knowledge on the topic of social media. Knowing this information about Facebook, Twitter, Linked in and Google + Gives people a great look at what each one can do and how you can connect them 

 

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Las tres enfermedades aliadas de la pérdida auditiva - Quiero oir

Las tres enfermedades aliadas de la pérdida auditiva - Quiero oir | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

La diabetes, la hipertensión y la obesidad son algunas de las enfermedades que favorecen la aparición de discapacidad auditiva en los pacientes que las sufren.  Según diversos estudios, estas patologías aceleran el deterioro de ciertas partes del oído provocando daños que, en ocasiones, son irreversibles.

 

La diabetes es un conjunto de trastornos metabólicos que afectan a diferentes órganos y tejidos, entre ellos, el oído. Esta enfermedad ataca a las estructuras más finas del órgano auditivo, destruyéndolas, a causa de los aumentos de glucosa y la falta de oxigenación en sangre. Asimismo, según los expertos del MSS, provoca la reducción de la capacidad de escucha.

 

La hipertensión es una enfermedad crónica caracterizada por un incremento continuo de los niveles de la presión sanguínea. Esto puede afectar a la arteria auditiva interna, una de las más pequeñas del organismo, osbtruyéndola y  provocando la disminución de la respuesta auditiva.

 

La obesidad es uno de los factores de riesgo más comunes a la hora de padecer problemas de audición según un estudio desarrollado por el Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello de la Universidad de Columbia (EE.UU) y cuyos resultados comprobaron que el 15% de los adolescentes obesos presentaban indicios de déficit auditivo neurosensorial frente al 7,8% de los jóvenes con un peso normal.

 


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Quiero Oir's curator insight, November 15, 2013 8:10 AM

Tanto la diabetes como la hipertensión y la obesidad  pueden prevenirse manteniendo un estilo de vida saludable y una dieta equilibrada. Sin embargo, la diabetes y la hipertensión, una vez diagnosticadas, deben tratarse siguiendo todas las indicaciones del especialista.

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Los mayores explican cómo construir una Donostia amigable - Diario Vasco

Los mayores explican cómo construir una Donostia amigable
Diario Vasco
Les ha tocado a los más mayores, es el momento en el que pueden expresar sus ideas para convertir Donostia en una ciudad amigable con quienes ya pasan de los 65, de los 70.

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Modelo individualizado de atención gerontológico.

Modelo individualizado de atención gerontológico. | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it
Elena Ortés's insight:

Gestora de casos sociosanitarios, formar, valorar y evaluar a l@s profesionales de servicios sociales es solo una parte del reto de futuro.

La iguadad real en el sector es parte del reto.

Camino al 2015.

 

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Bauer Health and Wellness Portal: Pain Takes No Holiday

Bauer Health and Wellness Portal: Pain Takes No Holiday | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

There is a reason for pain. Work, Exercise and Athletic Performance requires being acquainted with, and a frequent Companion with Pain. You best be listening to it, and the message it is sending.


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Elena Ortés's insight:

El dolor es un signo de alarma, escuchar al cuerpo es recomendable.

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Randy Bauer's curator insight, June 15, 2013 4:58 PM

Pain has a purpose. It is the body's way of telling you that something is out of balance, needs rest, and healing."Rest is when the efforts of your work manifest gain." - Randy Bauer

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Age Brings Happiness: Scientific American

Age Brings Happiness: Scientific American | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it
Exactly how much joy, however, depends on when you were born

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Elena Ortés's insight:

depends on when you were born and what you are, what you do, what you eat, how you live, be you......

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Nicole Arguedas Villalobos's comment, September 17, 2013 11:05 PM
This article shows the studies that have been made over the years dealing with elderly people being happy or grumpy when they reach an old age. It shows that the study shown to prove wether elderly people are happy or grumpy when their old has a lot to do with when they were born. Most americans born between 1885-1980 reach an old age and turn really grumpy. Not only because of how they were raised but also by the life experiences that they had. For example, the great depression. People struggled during that period and most americans dealt with terrible experiences. This article truley reminds me of the elderly people that show up at my job. Reading through it made me realize that depending on when they were born really has to do a lot with they way they act when they're older.Most people i know or have studied that were born between 1885-1980 were reallyh grumpy. It just makes me take a big look at not only the country but the whole world in general. It is so amazing how fast things have changed. One thing dealing most with technology and more laws. Americans did not have a lot back in those times and now elderly people born after the 1980's will most likely live a happy life when they reach an old age.
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Doctor Google visto con humor

Doctor Google visto con humor | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Nuestra viñeta de DocCom 2.0 aborda hoy un fenómeno cada vez más frecuente en las consultas: el uso de Google para buscar síntomas y tratamientos por parte de los pacientes, que llega a algunos extremos que no siempre hacen sonreír. Aunque el empoderamiento del paciente a través de Internet es positivo para mejorar la asistencia sanitaria, como han demostrado diversos estudios, no toda la información que se ofrece en Internet es fiable y, en ningún caso, puede servir para el autodiagnóstico.


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Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients

Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Emotions. It’s not something that comes to mind when you think of someone living with diabetes. But believe it or not, there are many profound feelings and emotions involved with diabetes management.

So often, diabetes is about a number. The number that corresponds to a fingerstick. The number you get every three months at the endocrinologist’s office. The number of times you’ve checked your blood sugar. The number of times you gave yourself a bolus of insulin. The number of carbohydrates in that snack you just had.

 

It’s exhausting. Trying to function as your own pancreas is flat out difficult. And because of both the stigma surrounding this disease and the nature ofHIPPA laws, it can be downright lonely sometimes. Even when you’ve got the most supportive family and friends and a terrific team of doctors, it feels like a battle that can only be fought and understood by you.

 

While others can see how sweaty and shaky low blood sugar makes you, they can’t feel the haze that comes along with it. While others can observe your reaction to a blood sugar check, they don’t feel the guiltfrom forgetting to bolus, or not bolusing enough, or bolusing too much. There is opportunity for much doubt and fear, and it can be easy to fall prey to.

 

I have a super weapon for dealing with some of the negative emotions I feel about diabetes. It’s called the Diabetic Online Community (DOC).

I discovered the DOC through Twitter, and quite accidentally. Now, I interact with other People with Diabetes all over the world across many social media platforms including, but not limited to, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Vine. I’ve connected with people diagnosed in early adulthood, like myself. I’ve talked to people who use an insulin pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor just like me. I’ve talked to people who are disappointed sometimes in all those numbers, just like me.

 

I’ve met many not like me as well. People who manage their diabetes with injections. People living withType 2 diabetes. People who are parents, caring for their children who live with diabetes. I’ve met people who challenged my thoughts, feelings and knowledge of this disease. People who cheered with me when my hard work paid off and others who reassured me when I was having a bad day.

 

I urge you to read some of the blogs written by some of the most popular DOC members. I’ve linked to some in this post already (Kerry, Lorraine and Alexis) but there are so many more diabetes bloggers out there. Some of my other favorites are George, Scott, Kim, Ginger, another Scott and this collection of Diabetes Bloggers at Diabetes Mine.

 

I’ve gained much since I found the DOC: A wealth of a knowledge I can turn to when I encounter a new situation. A camaraderie that I can depend on to rally with me. A kinship with people who just “get it.” I’ve even found a few real life friendships with people who live in the area. I don’t know where my diabetes management would be without the DOC. But I hope I never have to find out


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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, December 1, 2013 7:16 PM

Chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiac care have done and continue to do a great job in approaching rehabilitation.  Here's another example of how developing a community of support can make a difference in quality of life.  The more we can take models that work in other chronic illnesses and apply them in survivorship the faster we can get survivorship programs rolled out and in a way that works for survivors...not just what others THINK will work.

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The first step has been taken towards developing a nanorobot to deliver drugs inside the body

The first step has been taken towards developing a nanorobot to deliver drugs inside the body | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Using DNA self-assembly, the Aarhus University researchers Magnus Stougaard, Oskar Franch and Brian Christensen designed eight unique DNA molecules from the body’s own natural molecules. When these molecules are mixed together, they spontaneously aggregate in a usable form – the nanocage (see figure).

 

The nanocage has four functional elements that transform themselves in response to changes in the surrounding temperature. These transformations either close (figure 1A) or open (figure 1B) the nanocage. By exploiting the temperature changes in the surroundings, the researchers trapped an active enzyme called horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the nanocage (figure 1C). They used HRP as a model because its activity is easy to trace.

 

This is possible because the nanocage’s outer lattice has apertures with a smaller diameter than the central spherical cavity. This structure makes it possible to encapsulate enzymes or other molecules that are larger than the apertures in the lattice, but smaller than the central cavity.

 

The researchers have just published these results in the renowned journal ACS Nano. Here the researchers show how they can utilise temperature changes to open the nanocage and allow HRP to be encapsulated before it closes again.

 

They also show that HRP retains its enzyme activity inside the nanocage and converts substrate molecules that are small enough to penetrate the nanocage to products inside.

 

The encapsulation of HRP in the nanocage is reversible, in such a way that the nanocage is capable of releasing the HRP once more in reaction to temperature changes. The researchers also show that the DNA nanocage – with its enzyme load – can be taken up by cells in culture.

 

Looking towards the future, the concept behind this nanocage is expected to be used for drug delivery, i.e. as a means of transport for medicine that can target diseased cells in the body in order to achieve a more rapid and more beneficial effect.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Elena Ortés's insight:

De gran ayuda en la lucha contra el cancer.

Directo al foco.

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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:37 PM

drug delivery as well as novell instrument)

 

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Colectivos sociales critican que Lanbide “torea” a quienes solicitan ... - El País.com (España)

Colectivos sociales critican que Lanbide “torea” a quienes solicitan ... - El País.com (España) | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Colectivos sociales critican que Lanbide “torea” a quienes solicitan ayudas


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Vascos perciben que en Euskadi viven el doble de inmigrantes que ... - ABC.es

Vascos perciben que en Euskadi viven el doble de inmigrantes que ...


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Campus Uda Lizarra 2013 va tomando forma

Campus Uda Lizarra 2013 va tomando forma | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it
Web oficial de Easo Saskibaloi Taldea | Club Easo Baloncesto. Equipo de baloncesto en San Sebastián - Donostia, Gipuzkoa.
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Un estudio recomienda la historia clínica electrónica para aumentar la adherencia al tratamiento

Un estudio recomienda la historia clínica electrónica para aumentar la adherencia al tratamiento | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

Los médicos podrían mejorar la adherencia a los medicamentos con receta de los pacientes con el uso de registros electrónicos de salud, según un nuevo estudio publicado en el Journal of the American Medical Association.


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La salud 2.0 permite superar el miedo a la bata blanca

La salud 2.0 permite superar el miedo a la bata blanca | Elena Ortés | Scoop.it

El llamado "silencio de la bata blanca" es un término acuñado por Matthew J. Press, especialista en Salud Pública del Weill Cornell Medical College de Nueva York, para demonimar el terror que sufren muchos pacientes a formular sus dudas cuando se encuentran en un entorno sanitario y que levanta una auténtica barrera para una adecuada comunicación, según recoge el diario El Mundo. Muchos pacientes temen ser calificados como "difíciles" si sus preguntas resultan molestas o invasivas en ocasiones crean muros que dificultan esa fluidez de información que resulta necesaria para ambas partes, asegura Press.

 

Esa relación paternalista ha quedado superada en el entorno 2.0, donde el paciente se empodera y puede plantear sus necesidades y dudas a los profesionales sanitarios a partir del conocimiento que adquiere en la Red, no sólo con Dr. Google, sino también al compartir experiencias con otros pacientes y profesionales. 

 

Ese empoderamiento se nota cada vez más en la consulta presencial, en la que los pacientes acuden documentados y, lejos de convertirse en "difíciles", plantean dudas precisas que les ayudan a tomar decisiones sobre su propia salud y a mejorar la adherencia al tratamiento.


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