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Looking Into The Past of Books To See Their Future

Looking Into The Past of Books To See Their Future | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it

Historians know that those who don’t understand history are doomed to repeat it.

 

When it comes to books, we are doomed to repeat it anyway, at least according to Corey Pressman, founder of Exprima Media, a software design and development firm based in Portland, Oreg.

 

He’s also a recovering anthropology teacher ...


Via Carisa Kluver
Digital Gloss's insight:

An interesting take on the need to understand the evolution of our reading and writing practices. There's also a good list of books about reading in this piece.

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Carisa Kluver's curator insight, July 12, 2013 1:01 PM

Great insights & blog to follow ...

Marianela Camacho Alfaro's curator insight, July 16, 2013 11:15 AM

Corey Pressman: It’s always wise to look back, especially during periods of transition. Reading is an old and varied behavior, and the reading patterns, values, and assumptions with which we are familiar are themselves relatively new. Of course, they don’t seem that way because we rarely have cause to look back.

Electronic Publishing
About digital publishing, e-books, options for self-publishing, audio books, and other new publishing technology; also about the internet, that most enormous electronic publishing venture.
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Getty Images Gives Up, Makes Photos Available For Free

Getty Images Gives Up, Makes Photos Available For Free | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Getty Images, one of the largest sources of stock photos out there, has decided to distribute 35 million of its photos on the web absolutely free. Why? Because the photos were all out there anyway so it just gave up.
Digital Gloss's insight:

Finding new ways to credit creators and to monetize content continues to be a struggle in the increasingly digitized world. This article says, "Rather than continuing its practice of filing copyright infringement lawsuits or sending out settlement demand letters (often to people like bloggers that didn't have money to give Getty in the first place), Getty Images is giving options to use its photos legally (for non-commercial purposes) and making sure both it and the photographer get proper credit for their work."

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'OC Register' President: It's a Mistake Not to Invest in Print

'OC Register' President: It's a Mistake Not to Invest in Print | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Over the past eight years, newspapers have seen budgets cut and newsrooms shrink as readers — and more crucially, advertisers — have shifted from print to digital devices.
Digital Gloss's insight:

Eric Spitz says bad decisions played a big role in the decline of newspapers, "The key decisions they made — and they were the worst decisions anyone has made in my memory — they made 20 years or so ago. They took their core product, the news, and priced it at free. If you are McDonald's, you can give away straws, napkins, Wi-Fi and really nice TV sets that everybody can watch, but you can't give away cheeseburgers. [The newspaper] industry understood they were giving up one revenue stream [i.e., subscriptions], but they thought they could make that revenue up through advertising. I think 20 years later the amount of revenue you can derive from advertising is less than they thought. But the bigger problem they created is telling your customer that your product has no value. This industry has literally trained a generation of people [to expect] that if you find content online, it must be free. That's a really, really tough place to crawl out from under."

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Why Defining a Journalist Is Messy, But Crucial | Mediashift | PBS

Why Defining a Journalist Is Messy, But Crucial | Mediashift | PBS | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Edson C. Tandoc, Jr., a Fulbright Scholar at the Missouri School of Journalism, co-authored this post. Earlier this month we published a scholarly article in Quorum, the online edition of the N.Y.U.
Digital Gloss's insight:

This article discusses the difficulty of defining who exactly is a journalist. Changes in media and technology have "...complicated efforts to define a journalist, an issue relevant under not only federal shield bills but also under the federal constitution, state shield statutes, state retraction statutes, and press credentialing policies, all of which contain language defining a journalist. Some definitions are broad enough to include bloggers and citizen journalists, while others are narrow enough to exclude them." Those who did the study discussed in the article conclude that "it would be unwise to adopt a definition that excludes unpaid bloggers and citizen journalists who gather, process, and disseminate news and information on matters of public concern."

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The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
The real problem with ebooks is that they’re more 'e' than book, so an entirely different set of rules govern what someone can and can't do with them compared to physical books, especially when it comes to pricing.
Digital Gloss's insight:

In this article Art Brodsky explains why e-book pricing tends to hurt libraries. He says that a book like J.K. Rowlings pseudonymous "Cuckoo's Calling" will cost a library 79 Cents to $1.09 less than the consumer price when bought from a distributor. But the ebook, which will cost $6.50 for consumers, will cost libraries $78. In addition, some publishers limit the number of times the book can be checked out.

 

Some authors, he says, "...don’t mind the high prices charged to libraries because they don’t even like libraries to begin with. [Historian and novelist David O.] Stewart has called libraries 'undeniably socialist' because books can be loaned out (for free!) many times, costing writers money from presumably lost sales. This is the same justification book publishers use for their distorted ebook pricing." But many authors know how important libraries are -- like Jodi Picoult and Cory Doctorow, and they have joined the Authors for Library E-books campaign.In the meantime, the future of libraries grows more uncertain.

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David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world'

David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world' | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
The boom in digital streaming may generate profits for record labels and free content for consumers, but it spells disaster for today's artists, says David Byrne
Digital Gloss's insight:

David Byrne talks about the Content Creators Coalition in this article. He also says: "Musicians might, for now, challenge the major labels and get a fairer deal than 15% of a pittance, but it seems to me that the whole model is unsustainable as a means of supporting creative work of any kind. Not just music. The inevitable result would seem to be that the internetwill suck the creative content out of the whole world until nothing is left. Writers, for example, can't rely on making money from live performances – what are they supposed to do? Write ad copy?

"As Lowery has pointed out, there's no reason artists should simply accept the terms and join up with whatever new technology comes along. Now I'm starting to sound like a real Luddite, but taking a minute to think about the consequences before diving in seems like a pretty good idea in general. You shouldn't have to give up your privacy, or allow all sorts of information about yourself to be used, whenever you go online, for example."

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The differences between journalists and bloggers: an interview with Danna Young from the University of Delaware Department of Communication - Muck Rack

The differences between journalists and bloggers: an interview with Danna Young from the University of Delaware Department of Communication - Muck Rack | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
A common question upon first meeting is: What do you do?
Digital Gloss's insight:

The interview with Professor Young gives a more nuanced picture of the difference between bloggers and journalists when comparied to Professor Gilmor's comments in 2005. We've all learned a lot since then. But one thing that still occurs online is a lack of awareness for the need for attribution. Young says, "Another thing that makes me a little bonkers is the lack of ethical code surrounding posting and reposting other people's works on blogs and aggregator sites. I have a friend who runs the website rolereboot.org. She has had so many instances in which her writers (who she has paid) have found their work reproduced IN FULL with NO LINK to the original rolereboot story on some big name blogs and aggregator sites. In my mind, this is stealing, plain and simple. Professionally trained journalists would never do this -- at least, not without suffering some extremely negative consequences within their profession."

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No Child Left Untableted

No Child Left Untableted | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Rupert Murdoch’s new idea for how to educate America.
Digital Gloss's insight:

Author Carlo Rotello tries to be even-handed in his presentation but ultimately says little to dissuade us from the ominous implications of this sentence: “The tablets, paid for in part by a $30 million grant from the federal Department of Education’s Race to the Top program, were created and sold by a company called Amplify, a New York-based division of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, and they struck me as exemplifying several dubious American habits now ascendant: the overvaluing of technology and the undervaluing of people; the displacement of face-to-face interaction by virtual connection; the recasting of citizenship and inner life as a commodified data profile; the tendency to turn to the market to address social problems.”

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Divided we fall

Divided we fall | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
In the July/August issue of CJR, Francesca Borri wrote a powerful essay about the plight of being a freelancer, and a woman, covering the Syrian civil war for Italian media. The reaction to her piece was impassioned and global.
Digital Gloss's insight:

This article from Columbia Journalism Review highlights the plight of undervalued freelance journalists and the devaluation of journalism in general. From the article: "Freelancers have always had to deal with indifferent or abusive editors, and hustle to make even a modest living. But there are more freelancers today, and they are relied upon to cover more important stories—especially in far-flung hotspots like Syria—as the big media outlets have dramatically reduced their ambitions generally, and on foreign coverage specifically. Borri notes that editors can stick to the $70-per-story fee because there is always someone willing to take it, which suggests that part of the freelancers’ plight is a matter of market forces. But the failure of journalism’s gatekeepers to support them—in legacy newsrooms or startups—says something about industry morale broadly, not just about the economics."

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Washington Post considered using robot sportswriters | Poynter.

Create. Inform. Engage. | Journalism training, media news & how to's
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The Washington Post has considered using robot sportswriters for its high school sports coverage, and deputy high school sports editor Matt McFarland says it could yet happen.

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Counting the change

Counting the change | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
THIS summer a made-for-TV movie about a tornado carrying man-eating sharks was a surprise hit in America. The preposterous plot of “Sharknado” may strike a chord...
Digital Gloss's insight:

This article seems a little over-optimistic in its forecasts of increased spending on digital content. It does make the point, however, that mobile devices have encouraged people to pay for "content they can carry around with them," which could help the optimistic forecasts come true.

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Poor pay driving young journalists out of local papers, Northcliffe research reveals

Poor pay driving young journalists out of local papers, Northcliffe research reveals | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it

Less than half of the 60 trainee journalists who joined Northcliffe South East between 2008 and 2011 are still working in local papers.


Via Andy Bull
Digital Gloss's insight:

This informative article about the low pay young journalists receive (which is why many of them go on to PR and marketing jobs very quickly) is based on research by Alan Geere from a new book, What Do We Mean By Local? The Rise, Fall – and Possible Rise Again – of Local Journalism.

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Andy Bull's curator insight, August 14, 2013 11:35 AM

Interesting research that shows poor pay drives young journalsts out of local papers. From the news story: "Asked for reasons behind 'jumping ship', trainees generally cited pay. During the period, maximum pay for a trainee stood at £17,000 a year and one respondent complained about having to work 50 hours a week for £14,500 a year.

One former reporter said: “The pay can be very difficult to live on. It’s not all about the money, but as much as you can romanticise the idea of doing something as a passion, it is important to be able to pay your bills and eat properly…”

 

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How Do You Properly Compensate Content Creators When Content Curation Is The New King?

How Do You Properly Compensate Content Creators When Content Curation Is The New King? | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it

"The curator is getting more cred for recognizing good content than the creator is for making good content."

 


Via Robin Good, Monica S Mcfeeters
Digital Gloss's insight:

This is a thoughtful piece by Tara Hunt on how creators of original content can be compensated for their work. She praises YouTube's model and suggests that iStockPhoto might be a way for photographers to benefit from their creative work. Currently, writers are still looking for that great way to "get compensated."

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, July 22, 2013 12:34 AM

Thought provoking, however, montetization of curation is still very limited. Scoop.It & others offer no means for monetization at all. Like content creation, & most everything on the net, compensation for cuation is still a giant question mark.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, July 23, 2013 7:26 AM

I've heard everyone from Jaron Lanier to Tim Berners-Lee and a number of other noteworthy tech brains bring up this topic up. How do the creators of content and innovative ideas cash in on the contributions they have made that everyone is passing along and sharing? No one wants their work and thoughts stolen and most everyone I know wants creative people to keep creating what we need and want and would like them rewarded and to be able to earn a decent living doing that. This article is about how we can make sure that happens.

corneja's curator insight, July 23, 2013 5:24 PM

Thanks for this reflexion about contents and their creators in the times of the content curation!  Sorry, I didn't intend to make a rhyme. :-/

 

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Here’s how Amazon self-destructs

Here’s how Amazon self-destructs | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
If Amazon puts bookstores out of business, it will destroy the main way readers learn about new books to buy
Digital Gloss's insight:

Showrooming -- in which people browse in bookshops and then buy from Amazon to get a discount -- is bad for bricks-and-mortar booksellers. It's healthier for the future of reading if we pay a little more.

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New York magazine’s bad bet

New York magazine’s bad bet | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
The storied weekly earned plaudits for scaling back on print. Here's why it shouldn't have
Digital Gloss's insight:

While the discussions about print vs. digital continue apace, this article at Salon reminds us that without content creators, there won't be anything to read/listen to/watch. This list of industry problems is discouraging: "The MSN Networks – hardly a struggling company, what with Microsoft’s $79 billion in total equity – has killed virtually all of its original content, laying off numerous editors, contract workers and freelance writers in the process. (This includedthe “Dean Of American Rock Critics,” Robert Christgau, previously canned by a corporate-consolidating Village Voice.) The same goes for Bloomberg, which has laid off a number of its culture writers, as well as others across the newsroom. Britain’s Independent, meanwhile, had sacked all of its art critics. And any number of professional photographers have been unceremoniously eliminated from newspapers – the Chicago Sun-Times most notoriously— as well as from websites."

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The Decline of Wikipedia: Even As More People Than Ever Rely on It, Fewer People Create It | MIT Technology Review

The Decline of Wikipedia: Even As More People Than Ever Rely on It, Fewer People Create It | MIT Technology Review | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
The community that built the largest encyclopedia in history is shrinking, even as more people and Internet services depend on it than ever. Can it be revived, or is this the end of the Web’s idealistic era?
Digital Gloss's insight:

This is a comprehensive article on the difficulty of running a site like Wikipedia, which is the sixth most widely used website in the world and the largest source of free information on the internet.

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The End Of The Library | TechCrunch

The End Of The Library | TechCrunch | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
A simple link. That's all it took to unleash a hailstorm of angry emails, messages, tweets, and comments. Why? I dared wonder if libraries will continue to exist in the future.

I mean, it's not that crazy a notion, right?
Digital Gloss's insight:

MG Siegler says libraries don't serve the function they once did, and that when he suggests this, people are outraged. He says, "The internet has replaced the importance of libraries as a repository for knowledge. And digital distribution has replaced the role of a library as a central hub for obtaining the containers of such knowledge: books. And digital bits have replaced the need to cut down trees to make paper and waste ink to create those books. This is evolution, not devolution." But maybe some people think libraries serve additional functions. And that books still have a place. And so what is going on is more like a dialectic than a straightforward evolution. I can't wait to see the synthesis.

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Sucks To Be A Newspaper

Sucks To Be A Newspaper | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
It's a good thing the newspaper industry is...
Digital Gloss's insight:

Henry Blodget presents a grim picture of ad revenues for newspapers. "The newspaper ad spending collapse has been monumental. After peaking in the early 2000s, print ads have dropped off a cliff, and "digital dimes" haven't replaced them. On an inflation-adjusted basis, newspaper print ad spending is now back to 1950s levels." And not everyone agrees that this is good for journalism...

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In print, newspapers cut opinion

In print, newspapers cut opinion | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
A growing number of dailies have reduced the amount of newsprint they devote to editorials and commentary, a departure from tradition that has gone largely unnoticed outside the affected communities.
Digital Gloss's insight:

There's been a notable reduction in editorials and commentary in newspapers in recent years. Jodi Enda says, "There is no formal tally of reductions in editorials and commentary, but Pew Research Center interviews with editors across the country have confirmed a gradual shift both in the amount of space given over to opinion and in the missions of editorial and op-ed pages. Some papers have tried to compensate by running more editorials and columns online and launching more opinion-driven blogs. Some have shifted away from one of the historic missions of newspapers—influencing public opinion—and instead seek to foment community conversations online." Though there may be no formal tally, reductions since 2006 in the membership of the Association of Opinion Journalists show how fast this trend is growing.

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Dave Eggers, Arcade Fire and Other Hipsters Shun the Internet

Dave Eggers, Arcade Fire and Other Hipsters Shun the Internet | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Could the latest hipster trend could burst the tech bubble – and crash the economy?
Digital Gloss's insight:

OK, it's a little over the top, but this article about hipsters and their unwillingness to accept new technology without question and without criticism does have a strong conclusion, "But the anti-tech hipster vanguard has the potential to quickly convert its culture power into something more -- something with economic and political implications as disruptive as the internet itself. Imagine how different the Occupy protests could have been had they held their fire until now, when it seems less urgent to save our manufacturing core than to reject the totality and ubiquity of the iEconomy. The internet didn't just smash industries and supplant human jobs with our new server overlords. It made possible some of the largest private and public power-grabs in history -- an omnipresent surveillance state on the one hand, and, on the other, a financial industry capable of disassembling, reassembling, and trading impossibly complex debt instruments at virtually the speed of light. Call it the banality of systemic evil." Don't be evil, indeed.

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The secret success of French regionals

The secret success of French regionals | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it

Via Twipe
Digital Gloss's insight:

According to Steve Dyson, French regional newspapers are still very popular. He says, "Half of the French adult population – 25-plus million people – are reading daily newspapers, with 18 million of these being regional newspapers, a figure that is said to have grown in recent years." Their front pages feature a number of headlines, which Dyson seems to feel is key.

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Why news orgs should make it easier for readers to distinguish staffers from contributors | Poynter.

Why news orgs should make it easier for readers to distinguish staffers from contributors | Poynter. | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Create. Inform. Engage. | Journalism training, media news & how to's
Digital Gloss's insight:

We should be able to distinguish between contributors and staffers in online publications. Unpaid bloggers may or may not adhere to the higher standards expected of professional journalists. Silverman says, "The Huffington Post is considered a pioneer in having the work of staffers mingle with that of unpaid bloggers.


"Today there are more and more sites following a similar path: BuzzFeed allows anyone to publish to its Community section without vetting or payment, although as my colleague Andrew Beaujon recently reported, the “site devotes editorial help to the community section’s best users so their posts do better”; Medium requires people to be invited to contribute, but only edits and pays a subset of those published on the site; and Forbes mixes staffers and outside “contributors,” with the latter having the opportunity to earn revenue." 


At the very least, publications should indicate which content was "commissioned and edited by its team, and which posts were submitted as is, for free, by those with accounts."

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AOL to slash 500 jobs at Patch local news service

AOL to slash 500 jobs at Patch local news service | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
Up to 500 of Patch's 1,000 employees will go in the layoffs, which started on Friday with 350 people getting pink slips
Digital Gloss's insight:

The article notes: "Patch ran into the same problems that newspapers had already discovered – that it's expensive to cover local news. For about an 18-month period in 2010 and 2011, Patch was the biggest hirer of journalists, just as they were being laid off from struggling US newspapers, said media analyst Ken Doctor of Outsell Inc." Making local news coverage profitable seems to be surprisingly hard.

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Study: Mobile news "snacking" is up sharply, but tablets are the killer news devices

Study: Mobile news "snacking" is up sharply, but tablets are the killer news devices | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
People are turning to their mobile devices to read news more often than ever before, but they’re spending less time in news apps each time they do so, according to new figures from mobile and Web a...

Via Twipe
Digital Gloss's insight:

The most interesting note in this article is that the way people tend to share news stories is not so much Twitter and Facebook but email!

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The de-newspaperization of America

The de-newspaperization of America | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
The loss of newspapers is part of the long-term destruction of urban America
Digital Gloss's insight:

In this sobering piece Will Bunch says that the "denewspaperization" of America is catching up with the "de-industrialization" of America. He goes on to say: "It's happening in Detroit -- where the city is bankrupt and once-vibrant blocks are reverting to prairie, and where the papers are no longer delivered to the shrinking number of urban homesteads every day of the week. It's also happening in the river city of New Orleans, where the formerly beloved Times-Picayune is called "the Sometimes Picayune" because of cutbacks in print publication and delivery. The harshest cuts in jobs and print publication have come through Newhouse's Advance Publications, in cities like Birmingham (full disclosure, I worked there 1982-85...sigh), Harrisburg and now Cleveland." And he asks where people will get the news in those poor urban neighborhoods in which internet access is lagging.

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Google Serves 25 Percent of North American Internet Traffic | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Google Serves 25 Percent of North American Internet Traffic | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | Electronic Publishing | Scoop.it
A central cooling plant in Google?s Douglas County, Georgia data center.Photo: Google/Connie Zhou Everyone knows Google is big. But the truth is that i
Digital Gloss's insight:

When someone tells us how environmentally friendly a paperless world would be -- particularly if we replace print books with e-books -- we remind them how much energy it takes to store data and keep the internet up and running. The huge growth of Google facilities is a clear example of this.

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