Electroconvulsive Therapy
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Electroshock Therapy Treatment - ECT and how it works

Electroshock therapy is used for treatment of depression and manic depression. Electroshock therapy is usually administered to patients in a series of six to twelve treatments over a two week period.
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This article shows the major theories of how ECT works. The first one is neurotransmitter theory. The shock works like antidepressant medication, changing the way brain receptors receive mood-related chemicals, such as serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Another theory is the anti-convulsant theory, in which shock induced seizures teach the brain how to resist seizures. This effort to stop seizures dampens abnormally active brain circuits, stabilizing mood. In neuroendocrine theory, the seizure causes the hypothalamus (regulates water balance and body temperature) to release chemicals that cause changes throughout the body. The seizure may release a neuropeptide that regulates mood. The last is brain damage theory. The socks damage the brain, causing memory loss and disorientation that creates a temporary illustion that problems are gone. Shock supporters strongly disapprove this theory, which is used by shock critics.

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Shocks given at Rotenberg Center were “harming” autistic teen, expert testifies

Shocks given at Rotenberg Center were “harming” autistic teen, expert testifies | Electroconvulsive Therapy | Scoop.it
Being restrained and shocked for nearly seven hours at the Judge Rotenberg Center permanently damaged autistic teenager Andre McCollins, a psychiatrist testified in another dramatic day in court o...
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Being restrained and shocked for nearly seven hours at the Judge Rotenberg Center permanently damaged autistic teenager Andre McCollins. He was restrained and shocked for assaulting someone on a bus ride to school. Andre, inside a classroom after he refused to take off his jacket, was tied to a restraint board and shocked. This was against his will as he was screaming out for someone to help him and begging them to stop. This was an obvious misuse of power and shock therapy. This is not what the therapy was meant for but shows how dangerous it can be in the wrong hands.

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Electroconvulsive Therapy Works (ECT, shock therapy)

Electroconvulsive Therapy Works (ECT, shock therapy) | Electroconvulsive Therapy | Scoop.it
Electroconvulsive therapy is very controversial. Many have had bad shock therapy experiences in the past, but ECT does save people too. The Bipolar Burble blog.
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The objective of ECT is to cause brain damage and remove brain cells through convulsions. This makes ECT a gamble, unpredictability of what can happen to the brain. However, drastic times call for drastic measures. “If depression could be cured with lollipops it wouldn’t be a problem, but to the best of my knowledge, lollipops don’t have a very high success rate.” Chemotherapy and radiation kill people, but they are taking it to get rid of a horrible disease. Just like ECT. ECT has caused severe damage to some people’s minds, and these anti-psychiatry people are the most vocal. These are the people who are ruining the reputation of electroshock therapy, which has helped a great majority of people who have undergone it.

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The Hidden Side of Psychiatry by Gary Null

The truth about psychiatry, ECT, drugs, abuse, Prozac, fraud & brain damage.

Via Ngozi Angeline Godwell
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Electroconvulsive therapy is an extreme, dangerous treatment that just damages your brain. It only works in the short term, but that’s because of the memory loss when the currents cause brain damage. The patients forget what they were depressed about. When the patient's underlying problems return, she or he is even less able to deal with them than before the treatment, because of the brain injury. Another symptom of ECT is permanent learning disabilities which can ruin their life, career, and emotional state. ECT is not helping people, but killing people. The APA task force states that 1 in 10,000 people die of ECT.

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Ngozi Angeline Godwell's curator insight, December 20, 2012 7:17 AM

Involuntary Commitment


Each year, approximately one and a half million people are taken to psychiatric institutions against their will. That averages out to one person every 75 seconds. Often, there is no reasonable justification for committing a person. According to Bruce Wiseman, psychiatrists commonly make off-the-cuff diagnoses, having no real basis in medical fact, that result in people getting thrown into psychiatric facilities. This is not only possible, but easy to do, as it is sanctioned by state laws. Psychiatrists are given the police power to lock people up against their will. Sometimes, Wiseman states, people are put away for some of the most ridiculous reasons imaginable:

 

"A man who was picked up was pronounced schizophrenic by a psychiatrist and taken to a hospital, stripped and shocked. Subsequently, they found out that the man was simply speaking Hungarian.... That kind of thing goes on, on a very regular basis.

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A shocking truth | Macleans.ca - Science - Health

Visit Macleans.ca for the latest news, opinion and analysis on issues affecting Canadians covering politics, health, business, consumer issues culture, entertainment and more.
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Electroconvulsive therapy is back and popular in treatment of psychological disorders. Before, psychiatrists had no idea how to treat major depressive or bipolar disorders. However, no one knows for sure how ECT works. The current best guess is that ECT somehow reboots the brain by repairing neurotransmitter receptors that bind to serotonin and dopamine, the two major "happiness" transmitters. ECT’s arch enemies are psychoanalysts. As one Freudian asked in 1951, how could anything like this help someone whose real problem "is that his mother never loved him"? Freudians say that ECT was a sadistic assault on wretched people who just needed to talk.

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All about ECT - Electroconvulsive Therapy

All about ECT - Electroconvulsive Therapy
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ECT has been misunderstood because of the myths portrayed in the media. ECT has the highest success rate for severe depression, more than any other treatment. Antidepressants take on average three weeks to start working. ECT works much more rapidly so a person with intent on suicide would benefit more because suicide attempts are very rare after ECT. There are two types of ECT, unilateral and bilateral. Studies conclude that patients who received unilateral ECT performed better on attention and memory tests than those who received bilateral ECT. However, there is a question if unilateral is as effective.

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Math Skills Improved By Electric Shocks To Brain, Study Suggests - Huffington Post - Huffington Post

Math Skills Improved By Electric Shocks To Brain, Study Suggests - Huffington Post - Huffington Post | Electroconvulsive Therapy | Scoop.it
Math Skills Improved By Electric Shocks To Brain, Study Suggests - Huffington Post Huffington Post The idea of using electrical current to alter brain activity is nothing new—electroshock therapy, which induces seizures for therapeutic effect, is...
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Painless shocks, with much milder electrical stimulation than electro-shock therapy, can accelerate learning in a wide range of areas. A study created a control group with placebo shocks and another given a small electrical current. Two electrodes placed on the patients' heads targeted an area of the prefrontal cortex, thought to be key to arithmetic processing. The patients then memorized mathmatical "facts" and symbols. The two groups performed at the same level on the first day, however, over the next 4 days people receiving brain stimulation along with training learned to do the tasks two to five times faster than the people given the placebo shocks. After six months went by without shock, the researchers called them back and found that people who had received brain stimulation were still 30% faster at the same types of mathematical challenges.

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