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Rescooped by Paulo Simões from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
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C-MOOC : les compétences clefs

C-MOOC : les compétences clefs | eLearning | Scoop.it

Superbe carte mentale


Via Gilles Le Page, Frédéric DEBAILLEUL, juandoming
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Claire Jovanovic's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:04 PM

Ecosystème des compétences pour suivre un MOOC

Boris Lecathelinais's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:55 AM

Un shéma clair et complet qui montre les compétences requises, apprises et développés avec les MOOC. 

Nathalie Novo-Perez Porte's curator insight, February 20, 4:12 AM

Le plan du Métro MOOC !

Rescooped by Paulo Simões from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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MOOCs and other ed-tech bubbles

MOOCs and other ed-tech bubbles | eLearning | Scoop.it

"Why most of what currently excites the ed-tech world is hot air: MOOCs, Learning Analytics and Open Education Resources, amongst other fads.

It is impossible to make progress with a cogent argument for how education technology will transform education while most of the community accepts as self-evident half-baked notions of “independent learners” and “21st century skills”, believes that creativity is possible without knowledge, or that testing is a dirty word."


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 3, 2013 6:11 AM

And so Crispin Weston goes on to attack MOOCs, Learning Analytics and Open Educational Resources. After discussing each bubble, including why it is destined to pop, he discusses the question of what is needed to make the innovation that each bubble foreshadows, last.

 

Weston makes several sensible observations, such as "an academic education is not equivalent to a trip to the public library, digital or otherwise", or learning "analytics is predicated on 'big data' but in education, big data will not exist until we sort out the current failure of interoperability", or with Open Education Resources "the quality of the resources themselves and the pedagogies they represent are poor." However, these observations lead to incoherent arguments, in the case of Learning Analytics to downright insinuating ones. His arguments do not attempt to represent the complexity of the situation that surrounds each of these educational innovations. Rather they serve one purpose, portraying the innovation as a bubble. 

 

Weston's arguments lack subtlety to the degree that there seems to be an agenda underlying them, and indeed there is one. It is that research should be taken out of the hands of academics and public funding bodies to make place for "proper R&D that is commercially-funded and responds to market requirements." There is of course nothing wrong with companies getting involved in R&D. Indeed, in EU framework projects always commercial parties participate in the research consortia that are set up. But it is too simplistic to portray research done by companies as proper and all the rest as improper.

 

With Weston I have my doubt and worries about MOOCs, Learning Analytics and OERs. They have bubble-like qualities in that researchers and educational administrators seem too uncritically adopt them. Uncritically adopting technological innovations in education actually happens quite often. And industry has more than once played a dubious role in this, see what Todd Oppenheimer in his Flickering Mind writes about the money that was wasted on the introduction of computers in K-12 education. The conclusion should be that a discussion about innovations such as MOOCs, Learning Analytics, Open Educational Resources, e-Portfolios, Serious Games, Adaptive Learning systems should never be guided by political agendas such as boosting commercial research. There is enough to worry about as it is. What really gets me worried is the idea that the venture capitalists that fund the MOOCs are going to determine the destiny of Higher Education; precisely because they think commercially and respond to market requirements only.

Rescooped by Paulo Simões from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Experiences from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and how the MOOC could potentially increase diversity, social inclusion & learner engagement | Mark Morley

"There is currently much interest and excitement at the emergence of an educational approach commonly termed the ‘Massive Open Online Course’ or MOOC. ... I feel there is much we can learn from the delivery of MOOCs that can be used to enhance the on-campus experience supplemented by online course material and delivery. This format offers us the opportunity to investigate learning and improve teaching processes, perhaps more similar to the edX approach. It would seem appropriate to collect and use data to inform this process; treating learning and teaching as a field ripe for research, tying in to a research-led approach."


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Rose Heaney's curator insight, January 12, 2013 3:30 AM

comprehensive indeed - author has participated in a lot of moocs. Very readable intro for those who have never heard of moocs

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, January 13, 2013 6:17 AM

Interesting and detailed personal insight into cMOOCs and xMOOCs from a participant. I sincerely hope more learners take the time to reflect and share the experiences they have with this kind of learning context. I find as an educator that the student voice is important and assuming that the developers of MOOCs are prepared to listen to critique, both postive and negative, then this is a valuable factor which can lead to improvements which hopefully will have a positive effect on the learner experience and quality of learning.

 

 

 

Hamline CTL's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:22 PM

MOOCs are not going away!