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The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated

The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
A wonderful visual depiction of how educators can tap into their networks to expand and continually improve their teaching practice from a trove of rich resources. Illustrated by Langwitches, the image refers to Alec Couros’s original post exploring question, “What does the network mean to you?”

Via Anne Whaits
Justine Crompton's insight:

My EDEL20001 group is my latest network. They are a network of clever educators - I can only benefit. Networking!

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Leslie Minton's curator insight, July 17, 2013 8:49 AM

Great visual of how networks are created to support how best to utilize them in education.

Josi Sierra's curator insight, July 18, 2013 2:36 PM

Conectados somos mas ;-)

Lara Strickland's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:06 AM

Depicts exactly what I am exploring at the moment as part of my #H812 studies and MA in Online and Disctance Education.  Chosen however not to 'network' Facebook as I tend to use it socially rather than professionally.

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ePals Global Community - project page

ePals Global Community - project page | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
ePals is the social network optimized for K-12 learning. Over half a million classrooms in 200 countries and territories have joined the ePals Global Community to connect, collaborate and exchange ideas.
Justine Crompton's insight:

iSOLVE - This is a commendable project. Some great ideas.

Seems to really promote global, problem based, collaborative learning.

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{Infographic} The Flipped Classroom - Learning Unlimited

{Infographic} The Flipped Classroom - Learning Unlimited | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
Justine Crompton's insight:

An infographic that had the desired impact! I have only just recently encountered the concept of a “flipped classroom” so this visual was a concise and informative artefact to enhance my learning. The fact that, “Students watch lectures at home at their own pace, communicating with peers and teachers via online discussions”, and then engage with the focus concept (face-to-face) in the classroom sounds ideal. Students come to class with prior knowledge or skills and then refine and question, assisted by teacher and peers. Less time spent on basic instruction and more time on individualised student support and extension. Too good to be true, in a pure sense, I think so. However, some of the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning does offer some good strategies that are possible in my primary teaching context.

 

I can see how students may prefer to watch or interact with digital learning objects as “homework” to acquire the basics and then examine a concept or topic in greater depth in the classroom where they can pose and respond to questions. Students that require repeat instruction may appreciate the digital format that can be repeated (cognitive learning theory). Students desiring further information could locate further resources to extend their learning. Of course students would require access to the required technology and need to demonstrate commitment to independent learning for this to be successful.

An upper primary unit of work around Cyber Safety/Bullying lends itself well to this type of pedagogy. This unit is linked to the Education Queensland Smart Classrooms QCAR Cross Curriculum priority - Students understand the role and consider the impact of some ICT in society. They develop and apply ethical, safe and responsible practices when working with ICT in online and stand-alone environments. I work with students for only 30min per week in my role as teacher librarian. Students ask lots of questions, like to tell and share anecdotes and enjoy role play and problem solving during this unit but we lack time for them to really get into the numerous online resources. Expecting students to access online video, websites and games outside of class would leave more time for checking for student understanding, revisiting concepts if necessary and allowing them opportunities to apply decision-making skills. It may also promote home/school links if students discuss the concepts and digital resources in the home environment.

 

Although the at home tasks may tend to be augmented learning (if solely instructional) this objectivist approach to learning is still a valid way for students to gain the basics. Allowing for more constructivist learning would be when students are directed to some websites in this unit that truly allow for learning transformation such as on the Cyber Smart website where there are simulation games and problem solving scenarios. As the flipped classroom model requires home task completion working with the students’ classroom teacher would be advisable as it would be necessary for them to factor this into their homework routine.

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Education Futures | Designing Education 3.0

Education Futures | Designing Education 3.0 | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

Via Wes Heberlein
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Brett Taylor's curator insight, August 12, 2013 4:23 PM

Education 1, 2 ... 3 - really need to allocate time as an individual and with my team to putting some serious thought into where we would like to see community and workplace education heading - don't wish to be the one working in the realm of 1.0 while other educational sectors are at 3.0+!

Wes Heberlein's comment, August 13, 2013 9:39 AM
I agree with you to Kylie but as I say to my colleagues at work that sometimes its more beneficial in the long run to have these conversations or allow students time to undertake alternative activities if you can see results being reaped in the end.
Wes Heberlein's comment, August 13, 2013 9:41 AM
Elena thanks for the compliment :) I know they appreciate the enthusiasm, motivation and support. Really helps them to thrive.
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12 Principles Of Mobile Learning

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor, Stewart-Marshall, Anne Whaits
Justine Crompton's insight:

This prompted my thinking in relation to eLearing. I am trying to look at a 'bigger" picture of what might be involved or included. Particularly connected with the points re: metrics and play. Curation point sad but true in reference to teachers I think.

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Dana Hawkins's comment, August 8, 2013 7:34 PM
The curation comment is interesting... I think it's fantastic that students are able to gain these skills without the assistance of a teacher, but ultimately if they veer off the path or have been misguided, they will always need a facilitator to not only show students the tools but also give them some best practice ideas.
Viljenka Savli's curator insight, August 12, 2013 11:13 PM

A new approach to learning and teaching concerns students' selflearning and assessing and of course techer's coaching. More about main principals in this article...

Mary Kate Lavin's curator insight, February 6, 11:39 AM

This describes the 12 principles of mobile learning.  It describes not only how to use technology in classes but also the reasoning behind using it.  

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The Padagogy Wheel ... it's a Bloomin' Better Way to Teach

The Padagogy  Wheel ... it's a Bloomin' Better Way to Teach | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

" Dr Ian Green from the School of Education here at Adelaide and I [Allan Carrington] have used Padagogy 101 (introduction to iPad in HE) and Padagogy 201 (more advanced use for L&T) to train over 600 faculty from universities in Australia. During my research I saw lots of great work done by others using Bloom’s Taxonomy including the Revised Taxonomy which has now become the Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. However when I discovered the excellent pioneer work done by Kathy Schrock with “Bloomin’ Apps” I got the idea for the Padagogy Wheel. Dare I say it but it is the next version for mobile learning of the ongoing importance of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Bloom’s is still fundamental to good teaching and learning."


Via Anne Whaits
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Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:12 PM

A good starting point for I-pad apps and usage for educational purposes. Great to have the links. As always the first step in a journey that has many twists and turns. It takes you where you want to go but there are many pathways you can take and who knows where they will lead you!Sometimes it's the journey that is important not just the destination.

Audrey's comment, August 16, 2013 5:05 AM
This is so helpful. As a visual learner I can see how the wheel can be used for home schooling. It is a fantastic resource for contextualising learning.
Mary Coghlan's comment, August 19, 2013 5:11 PM
I really like how this is presented. A great approach that presents a number of choices to be used for teaching and learning. Being a visual learner, I find this very accessible.
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Constructivist Learning

Commentary on Constructivist Learning Theory. Made for Education class, University of Vermont. Quotes: John Green's TEDx Talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...
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Move Over Three R's, Here Come the Three C's - Create, Curate and Collaborate - Teach Amazing!

Move Over Three R's, Here Come the Three C's - Create, Curate and Collaborate - Teach Amazing! | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

"In the 20th Century, and probably back to the Renaissance, the “Three R’s”, reading, writing and arithmetic were arguably a good basis for education. Take it easy all of you Constructivists out there…I can feel you getting riled up with the mere mention of the Three R’s! Back to basics movements blossomed several times in the last century and seem to be full steam ahead today with the emphasis on standardized testing.

 

But now we are in a new age and the Three R’s simply won’t do. We need to add what I call the “Three C’s”. Create, Curate and Collaborate."


Via John Evans
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Mary Coghlan's comment, August 11, 2013 2:48 AM
I see curation as essential skill for students, enabling a critical evaluation of huge amounts of content.
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Bloomin' Apps

Bloomin' Apps | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
Includes all the Bloomin' versions in one place!
Justine Crompton's insight:

Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Everything website (2012) offers a plethora of mobile apps and Web 2.0 tools to support the varying levels of learning linked to Bloom’s (Revised) Taxonomy of cognitive processes. Of particular interest is her Bloomin’ Apps iPad edition image which is based on cogs rather than the original triangular shaped hierarchy. She has described this as “interlocking of cognitive processes”. I think this is a much more apt visual representation of the various levels of thinking. Inclusion of terms that link to eLearning such as blogging, mashing, networking make this a useful image (and website) for the professional development of teachers. Although most teachers are familiar with Bloom's Taxonomy and how it applies to lesson and unit design they are usually likely to be less familiar (and probably confident) in how this applies to ICTs and eLearning. It could also be used to enhance student metacognition of the learning process.

Schrock has assembled iPad apps that support Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy. Higher order thinking (analysing, evaluation and creating) is well covered with suggested apps to allow student learning to occur at these levels. Each app icon links to the iTunes app page for further information. She has created an equivalent version for Android, Google and Web 2.0. The suggested apps in the higher levels would be useful for teacher and student participation in collaborative learning contexts in which the joint construction of knowledge is a desired outcome. Use of the apps would support social constructivist learning in which the learner is actively involved in task completion. Many of the apps allow the learner to solidify and present complex thoughts for an audience (networked learning) with whom they want to connect.

I could see the following apps used for task redefinition to promote higher order thinking:-

Skype Conferencing – mentoring outside of a local geographic area.Wufoo– surveying on a larger scale than would be otherwise possible.Mindmash– brainstorming then sharing to gain feedback on which ideas can be refined.Twitcasting Live – streaming live video of a performance. Distance education assessment with peer grading in real time could benefit from this technology.
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Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 - Betchablog

Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 - Betchablog | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
My role at school is all about trying to helping teachers leverage technology to come up with more interesting and engaging ways to help their students learn.  Some of our older students are in laptop programs which gives them fulltime 1:1 access ...

Via Sandy Shannon
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Dana Hawkins's comment, August 8, 2013 6:20 PM
This is a great series of learning tasks that would be equally useful for vocabulary development for ESL students. I like how the author actually acknowledges the strengths and weaknesses of the tasks.
Kylie Joyce's comment, August 10, 2013 2:52 PM
The potential for this type of task to be utilised throughout the curriculum is outstanding. And when students are given the opportunity to tackle more advanced projects, they often surprise us!
Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 3:06 PM

Now this gives me great ideas

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The Biggest Online Learning Trends Of The Year - Edudemic

The Biggest Online Learning Trends Of The Year - Edudemic | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
There are a host of online learning trends that have popped up over the year. Here's a detailed look at each of them.
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Dana Hawkins's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:30 PM

I find it really interesting that the market for gamification has increased massively, and that the average age of online learners increased to 34.

Brett Taylor's comment, August 12, 2013 4:09 PM
These are the trends I like to read about - they assert my belief in the value of serious gaming as a means of valid learning outcomes and really give voice to the mobility of the learning experience.
Brett Taylor's curator insight, August 12, 2013 4:11 PM

You can't go wrong if your educational thoughts lean towards mobile delivery of interactive game-influenced content - happy to hear about these trends.

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At The Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement

At The Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

The new version of the Padagogy Wheel tackles a major question that is lurking in the back of everyone’s mind. If it’s not … it should be. It’s about the problem of motivation in education. How do we motivate students, teachers, parents, and everyone else to get excited about learning? How do you stay motivated? What works and what doesn’t?”

Jeff Dunn: Editor Edudemic Blog Post:

"Updated Padagogy Wheel Tackles The Problem Of Motivation in Education" (http://tinyurl.com/edudemicpadwheel2)


Via Allan Carrington, Anne Whaits
Justine Crompton's insight:

Links to the Bloom's Pedagogy Wheel nicely.

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Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:06 PM

I think I will find this very useful for my planning

Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, September 28, 2013 9:43 PM
I repeat.it is great.
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:14 AM

Three key components for Motivation: Autonomy, Purpose and Mastery .

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The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated

The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
A wonderful visual depiction of how educators can tap into their networks to expand and continually improve their teaching practice from a trove of rich resources. Illustrated by Langwitches, the image refers to Alec Couros’s original post exploring question, “What does the network mean to you?”

Via Anne Whaits
Justine Crompton's insight:

My EDEL20001 group is my latest network. They are a network of clever educators - I can only benefit. Networking!

more...
Leslie Minton's curator insight, July 17, 2013 8:49 AM

Great visual of how networks are created to support how best to utilize them in education.

Josi Sierra's curator insight, July 18, 2013 2:36 PM

Conectados somos mas ;-)

Lara Strickland's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:06 AM

Depicts exactly what I am exploring at the moment as part of my #H812 studies and MA in Online and Disctance Education.  Chosen however not to 'network' Facebook as I tend to use it socially rather than professionally.

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The Ten eLearning Commandments [Infographic]

The Ten eLearning Commandments [Infographic] | eLearning in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
Similar to having a mission statement or defined company goals, your eLearning development should rely on these few general pillars of succes.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 8, 2013 8:52 PM

Love this!  

Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:14 PM

I want this poster up where I can see it. Maybe it could be made into a stick on protective coating for the lid of my laptop.