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Pharma gets social: pharma Twitter corporate communications | pharmaphorum

Pharma gets social: pharma Twitter corporate communications | pharmaphorum | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

This article is about the top 15 pharmaceutical companies’ use of social media site Twitter for corporate communications. Want to know how some of the largest pharmaceutical companies rank in terms of followers and tweets on social networking site Twitter? Daniel Ghinn examines the 140-character tweets of Novartis, Sanofi, GSK and Pfizer, to name a few, in his latest article. Read on to find out how they all scored


Via Dinesh Chindarkar, Philippe Marchal
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Virtual learning used by three-quarters of employers

Virtual learning used by three-quarters of employers | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
This is according to the benchmark study, eLearning courses were the most popular learning technology this year, used by 80% of employers.
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Instructional Design -- Welcome!

Instructional Design -- Welcome! | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
Description (Instructional Design for eLearning -- Welcome!
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Social business: a transformation in how business is done

Social business: a transformation in how business is done | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

On November 8, 2012, The IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV), in conjunction with the Economist Intelligence Unit, released the results from a survey of over 1,100 executives and 26 in-depth interviews with global businesses across a dozen industries. The survey investigated organizational views of social business. Here's what we found:

 

1. Social business is gaining notable traction in organizations

 

Half of the companies surveyed increased their investments in social business in 2012, and two-thirds indicated they were going to increase their expenditures in the next two years.

 

2. Organizations will primarily apply social tools and capabilities in the near term

 

They will do so in order to create valued customer experiences, drive workforce productivity and effectiveness, and  accelerate innovation.

 

3. Despite intentions to rapidly ramp up their social business efforts, companies recognize potential challenges

 

Nearly three-quarters of survey respondents reported being under-prepared for the required cultural changes. Two-thirds were not sure they sufficiently understood the impact social business would have on their organizations over the next three years.


Via Andrew Spong
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How To Create A Digital Marketing Strategy

How To Create A Digital Marketing Strategy | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

Where is the starting point in such a mission?

Already from the title I'm a little concerned that we're going to create isolation. Yes, I'm a digital geek, but to really shift the needle digital is only part of multi-channel. If we want Pharma to have a meaningful impact on their target audience we need to start upstream.

This article is however an excellent read as there is alot of structure and great elements that are all part of the magic that is needed in delivering results.


Via Sven Awege, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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The 5 Decisive Components of Outstanding Learning Games

The 5 Decisive Components of Outstanding Learning Games | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

eLearning experts believe that games and playing need to be part of a course for adults to learn effectively.


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Should #pharma be building apps? Is it a credible service provider?

Should #pharma be building apps? Is it a credible service provider? | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

Sven Awege (@svennieco) writes:

 

Over the last 20 years I’ve heard huge numbers of people get really excited about the latest fad. As a digital evangelist I guess that is to be expected. But are “mobile apps” (in Pharma) any different?

 

Simply put, no (but read on until the end, there is a twist).

 

Personally I love the Gartner hype graph. It really does fit the cycles that technologies go through (where innovation overtakes conventional wisdom). The bit that really gets me excited though is the part coming out of the trough of disillusionment. This is where we see a more mature understanding and approach, and the headless chickens have already run off to the next buzz word, leaving the professionals to industrialize solutions.

 

Currently I’d say mobile apps, in the Pharma industry, are on the rapid slide down after the big hype. We’ll see many (more) projects die painful and internally mediatized deaths, as the true value propositions start to appear. This is also the phase when we need to anchor mobile value into the bigger picture of multi-channel engaging communication, where Pharma starts changing how it sees its customers with some serious behavioral (and budget) changes associated. If we do not achieve this now then mobile might take another 5 years to mature within Pharma.

 

But for now lets assume that we’re looking for a shorter-term business case of a marketing driven mobile app initiative.

 

Initially this type of project seems like it should be easy to define and execute. In reality the environment in which we work will dictate otherwise, meaning that we should not go into this with our eyes shut just because our trusted agency recommended an app project.

 

Firstly we need to ask the question:

 

Why build an app in the first place?

 

[AS: Read the rest of Sven's article on his Pharma Strategic blog by clicking on the title link above.]


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Pfizer, JJ, Novartis and Sanofi tops in social media, say patients

Pfizer, JJ, Novartis and Sanofi tops in social media, say patients | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

Pfizer has the strongest social media presence of any pharma, a WEGO Health/Digital Health Coalition poll suggests.

 

WEGO surveyed 356 of its Health Activists on health social media, and when asked to name a drug company they were aware of that used social media to engage patients, Pfizer got 32 mentions. It was followed by J&J (14 mentions), Novartis (13) and Sanofi (10).

 

Sanofi drew lavish praise for its efforts in diabetes through social media. One Health Activist commented that the company “is actively trying to involve the diabetes community through a fantastic social media manager.” WEGO CEO Jack Barrette said the company's Twitter efforts were a model for the industry which is lagging on that front.

 

“With a company like Bank of America, all you have to do is hashtag something and you'll get a response,” says Barrette. “We all know there's reasons pharmas don't respond, but then there's companies like Sanofi that are doing a great job of it. For two years now, Sanofi has been having an active conversation with the community and the community is pointing at that, saying ‘Sanofi is doing what we're asking you to do.'”

 

Another Health Activist commented that “You see Novartis pretty much everywhere – particularly in cancer-related discussions.” A third cited Endo's painaction.com as “a fantastic online community” with “articles, lessons, personal stories, self checks, tools, pain library of communication skills, knowledgeable base, self management skills, emotional coping, med safety.”

 

But in general, WEGO's Health Activists, patients who are highly active online, said pharmas are falling down on patient engagement. The survey found concern about bad medical info online, with 61% agreeing that “there are many misconceptions, and a great deal of misinformation, about healthcare companies' products” on general social media sites, and 47% agreeing with that statement for dedicated health social media sites. Eighty-two percent agreed that companies have a responsibility to correct misinformation in social media if they become aware of it, though 80% said that while companies should be held responsible for comments they make in social media, they shouldn't be held responsible for others' comments. Majorities agreed that healthcare company participation in social media should be regulated when firms leave comments on third-party sites (57%), sponsor social networking sites for a condition (58%), have editorial authority to change, alter and edit health and medical content (62%), pay bloggers to create content (64%) and pay for the creation of health and medical content to place in social media (66%).

 

Negative impressions of pharmas in online health communities outweighed positives 47% to 30%, but 23% said they were neutral on the question.

 

“It's a little like a presidential race where there's a substantial undecided vote,” said Barrette. In this contest, the drug industry is well behind, but could still close the gap.

 


Via Thibaud Guymard
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Top 100 ranking websites in eLearning and learning technology « Learning Technologies « Now Communications

Top 100 ranking websites in eLearning and learning technology « Learning Technologies « Now Communications | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
Last summer we created a bit of a stir when we first published our definitive 100 Highest Ranking Web sites in Learning Technology Chart, so when it came to cooking up our first news nugget of 2012 we thought: why not turn things up a notch?
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10 Awesome Infographics about eLearning

10 Awesome Infographics about eLearning | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
What is eLearning? What it takes to create effective eLearning?

 

 =============================================

 

 


Via Gust MEES, LearningLab
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Rich Beaudrie's curator insight, December 12, 2012 9:20 AM

Can gen ed teachers streamline this process? Rapid Development?

Fabio Ballor's curator insight, December 28, 2012 4:29 PM

200 ore lavoro uomo per ogni ora di formazione elaraning!!! In quale pianeta?

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Elearning Pedagogy

Elearning Pedagogy | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
The process of learning and teaching online (Elearning Pedagogy by @paula_ary on @scoopit http://t.co/SsD4DzXe Good source for curating information #bif2012 #artised...)...
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eLearning vs. Classroom Learning Infographic

eLearning vs. Classroom Learning Infographic | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it
Trying to decided whether you should take your Drivers Ed in a classroom or online? We've put together this infographic to show you why taking your class online is an easier and more efficient to finish your course.
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Poll Shows Growing Satisfaction with Pharma's use of Social Media | eyeforpharma

Poll Shows Growing Satisfaction with Pharma's use of Social Media | eyeforpharma | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

Poll Shows Growing Satisfaction with Pharma's use of Social Media

Posted by Ben Steele on Oct 25, 2012

 

A recent survey indicates that those clinging to the argument that pharma are behind in the digital space, may be beginning to fall behind themselves...

A recently released WEGO Health/Digital Health Coalition survey suggests that pharma companies may finally be warming up to social media. The recently-conducted survey of 356 health activists showed that 81% believed pharma used social media 'to provide their communities with important updates on products or services'. The amount of people who subscribed to the above viewpoint went up 9% from last year’s survey findings.


Via rob halkes, Chanfimao, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Good Ideas Can Come from Anywhere Advice for Medical Leaders

Good Ideas Can Come from Anywhere Advice for Medical Leaders | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

“An idea that can change the course of the company can come from anywhere.”

 

This is the advice Jack Dorsey gave at TechCrunch Disrupt. @Jack is the co-founder of Twitter and the mobile payment startup, Square, that allows anyone, anywhere, to accept credit cards via a small reader that attaches to a smartphone or iPad.

 

I encourage you to watch the 12-minute video of Jack’s keynote that puts a twist on the notion of a “founder” and the pivotal idea. The key to innovation, he says, is to be open to new ideas no matter where they come from.

 

Medical Leaders in an Idea Economy


Some of the biggest barriers in health innovation are hierarchical mindsets. In an idea economy, medical leaders cannot be arrogant. In today’s social networked world, ideas can come from anywhere, but some fail to see the value.

 

Dr. Ronan Kavanagh expresses his disappointment with colleagues who ask, “Are you still wasting your time on Twitter?” According to Dr. Kavanagh:

 

“Engaging in health-related activities on social media channels is the most important thing I have done for my medical life since completing my specialist training. It has renewed my fascination for healthcare in a way I haven’t felt since I was a medical student and doing so, has undoubtedly quelled a mid-life ennui with my career. It has transformed the way I learn (where I had all but stopped learning) and introduced me to new and interesting friends.”

 

Dr. Kavanagh reminded me of my presentation for the Ideagoras healthcare innovation conference in Madrid two years ago. Innovators are learners, not experts.

 

“Success no longer comes from possessing knowledge; instead, you have to participate in creating a flow of knowledge.” -Walter Isaacson, The Aspen Institute...


Via Thibaud Guymard
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History of eLearning: “E” is for “Evolutionary”

History of eLearning: “E” is for “Evolutionary” | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

eLearning—also known as online learning, educational technology, computer-based training (CBT), and web-based training (WBT)—has roots deep in the early decades of the 20th century.


Via Terese Bird
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Ольга Михеева's curator insight, April 12, 2013 8:58 AM

Блог о истории электронного обучения и масса полезных статей!

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Big Data is transforming the nervous system of healthcare

Big Data is transforming the nervous system of healthcare | eLearning for the Life Science Industry | Scoop.it

The nervous system of data is developing at tremendous rates thanks to growth factors like social media, gadgets that record how much electricity each appliance in your house eats up, consumer genomics, and personal trackers like Fitbit, Zeo or the Nike fuel bracelet.

 

“The challenge is … how do you make it something [people] care about?” asked Smolan. As the popularity of Instagram indicates, often, the answer is pictures. So through the Human Face of Big Data, Smolan aims to morph abstract data points into something visceral, emotional and tangible. The crowd-sourced venture capitalizes “on humanity’s new ability to collect, analyze, triangulate and visualize vast amounts of data, in real time,” according to the project’s website.

 

And as self-quantifiers Kevin Kelly and Gary Wolf mentioned in a later session at the conference, people are measuring everything from their sleeping patterns to how fast their toenails grow.

 

They’re using devices as varied as smartphones, headbands, cars that track their own health and the health of their driver, and carpets that monitor a person’s balance and gait.

 

These kinds of personal tracking devices begin to address the “big challenge [of] expanding the scope of big data in healthcare to encompass an individual’s environment outside the walls of the clinic or hospital,” wrote Joel Dudley, director of biomedical informatics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.

 

They also give ordinary people the opportunity to craft scientific and health-related questions, not just provide answers, said Quantified Self Co-Founder Gary Wolf.


Via Andrew Spong
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