eLearning and research
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eLearning and research
The research GRoup of Interaction And e-Learning (GRIAL) is a Recognised Research Group of the University of Salamanca and a Recognised Group of Excellence by the Regional Council of Castille and León. The group is formed by a large number of researchers from different fields of knowledge (see "Miembros del grupo"). Most members have a technical or a pedagogical profile, but there are also members with expertise in e-Learning project management, Humanities, Sciences, etc. The research activity of the group in these last few years has ranged from purely technical and computing projects to the development of pedagogical methodologies and models of reference in the field of online learning which have gained international recognition and awards.
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The Twitter experience : the role of Twitter in the formation and maintenance of personal learning networks

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Research publications on Massive Open Online Courses and Personal Learning Environments

Research publications on Massive Open Online Courses and Personal Learning Environments | eLearning and research | Scoop.it

Buena recopilación de su trabajo sobre MOOC

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elearn Magazine: Why Is the Research on Learning Styles Still Being Dismissed by Some Learning Leaders and Practitioners?

I have been battling the notion of...
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New Publication: Accreditation of prior learning as a lever for lifelong learning: lessons learnt from the New Opportunities Initiative, Portugal

New Publication: Accreditation of prior learning as a lever for lifelong learning: lessons learnt from the New Opportunities Initiative, Portugal | eLearning and research | Scoop.it
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The Rise of K–12 Blended leaRning

http://www.innosightinstitute.org/innosight/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/The-Rise-of-K-12-Blended-Learning.pdf

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Tweeting for teachers: how can social media support teacher professional development

Time and time again, research shows that teacher quality is by far the most
important factor in driving up standards in schools. Effective ongoing professional
development is key to ensuring that teachers perform to the best of their abilities,
keep abreast of new developments, and adapt their practice to take account of
these.
The UK government, like many others, has taken this message to heart. Underlining
its commitment to improving teacher quality in its 2010 white paper, The
Importance of Teaching, it has introduced a range of measures in this area, including
changes to Initial Teacher Training and the introduction of new Teaching Schools.
The government also recognises the importance of encouraging and enabling
teachers to learn from each other, stating that ‘we know that teachers learn best
from other professionals and that an ‘open classroom’ culture is vital: observing
teaching and being observed, having the opportunity to plan, prepare, reflect and
teach with other teachers.’
1
Many teachers and school leaders would applaud this focus, and are already one
step ahead. Using emerging technologies and social media tools, teachers are
beginning to take control of their own professional development, finding new ways
to learn from each other, to reflect on their own practice, and to develop learning
and support networks of like-minded professionals all over the world.
In the current constrained financial climate where, despite the best intentions,
CPD budgets are often the first to be cut, this type of low cost, self-directed
teacher development is interesting. Might the spread of such informal, peer-based,
online CPD help to support the government’s drive to raise teaching standards,
supplementing the larger scale plans at minimal additional cost? This paper explores
this question, seeking to understand:
• How are teachers and other educators currently using social media to aid their
professional development, and what do they and their students gain from it?
• What evidence is there for the benefits of peer-to-peer teacher CPD, and for
using social media in this way?
• What can teaching learn from industry in this respect?
Drawing on emerging academic research in this area, and on the experience of
trailblazing teachers, it recommends a number of ways in which school leaders
and policymakers can exploit the benefits of social media for teacher professional
development.

 

http://pearsoncpl.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Tweeting-for-teachers.pdf

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The Socialbot Network: When Bots Socialize for Fame and Money

ABSTRACT
Online Social Networks (OSNs) have become an integral
part of today's Web. Politicians, celebrities, revolutionists,
and others use OSNs as a podium to deliver their message
to millions of active web users. Unfortunately, in the wrong
hands, OSNs can be used to run astroturf campaigns to
spread misinformation and propaganda. Such campaigns
usually start o by in ltrating a targeted OSN on a large
scale. In this paper, we evaluate how vulnerable OSNs are
to a large-scale in ltration by socialbots: computer programs
that control OSN accounts and mimic real users. We adopt
a traditional web-based botnet design and built a Socialbot
Network (SbN): a group of adaptive socialbots that are or-
chestrated in a command-and-control fashion. We operated
such an SbN on Facebook|a 750 million user OSN|for
about 8 weeks. We collected data related to users' behav-
ior in response to a large-scale in ltration where socialbots
were used to connect to a large number of Facebook users.
Our results show that (1) OSNs, such as Facebook, can be
in ltrated with a success rate of up to 80%, (2) depending
on users' privacy settings, a successful in ltration can result
in privacy breaches where even more users' data are exposed
when compared to a purely public access, and (3) in prac-
tice, OSN security defenses, such as the Facebook Immune
System, are not e ective enough in detecting or stopping a
large-scale in ltration as it occur

 

http://lersse-dl.ece.ubc.ca/record/264/files/ACSAC_2011.pdf?version=1

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Development of Learning Theories |Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building

Development of Learning Theories |Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building | eLearning and research | Scoop.it

Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building: Scientific background - University of Helsinki, Finland.

Networked Learning explored. New metaphors of learning: going beyond constructivism - learning as knowledge acquisition, participation, knowledge creation, progressive inquiry; knowledge building, collaborative nature of learning and cognitive growth.

A really worthwhile read!

 


Via Anne Whaits
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Evaluación por competencias

Evaluación por competencias | eLearning and research | Scoop.it
Cuando estaba estudiando en el instituto, tenía un profesor que cada vez que un alumno escribía en un examen o  en un ejercicio una "burrada" decía: "es que el papel lo aguanta todo"; esta máx...

Via Ramon Aragon
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Game-Based Learning Units for the Everyday Teacher | Edutopia

Game-Based Learning Units for the Everyday Teacher | Edutopia | eLearning and research | Scoop.it
A game-based unit includes structures, themes, and mechanisms for trial and error.
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Smart Phone, Smart Science: How the Use of Smartphones Can Revolutionize Research in Cognitive Science

Smart Phone, Smart Science: How the Use of Smartphones Can Revolutionize Research in Cognitive Science | eLearning and research | Scoop.it

Abstract Top
Investigating human cognitive faculties such as language, attention, and memory most often relies on testing small and homogeneous groups of volunteers coming to research facilities where they are asked to participate in behavioral experiments. We show that this limitation and sampling bias can be overcome by using smartphone technology to collect data in cognitive science experiments from thousands of subjects from all over the world. This mass coordinated use of smartphones creates a novel and powerful scientific “instrument” that yields the data necessary to test universal theories of cognition. This increase in power represents a potential revolution in cognitive science.

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Las revisiones sistemáticas | Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

Las revisiones sistemáticas | Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano | eLearning and research | Scoop.it

Revisiones sistemáticas

Si alguien decide hacer una visión crítica de los artículos que han aparecido en la literatura médica o de salud sobre un tema en particular se dice que es «una revisión de la literatura".

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The Future of Online Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: The Survey Says… (EDUCAUSE Quarterly) | EDUCAUSE

By Kyong-Jee Kim and Curtis J. Bonk
Institutions of higher education have increasingly embraced online education, and the number of students enrolled in distance programs is rapidly rising in colleges and universities throughout the United States. In response to these changes in enrollment demands, many states, institutions, and organizations have been working on strategic plans to implement online education. At the same time, misconceptions and myths related to the difficulty of teaching and learning online, technologies available to support online instruction, the support and compensation needed for high-quality instructors, and the needs of online students create challenges for such vision statements and planning documents.

In part, this confusion swells as higher education explores dozens of e-learning technologies (for example, electronic books, simulations, text messaging, podcasting, wikis, blogs), with new ones seeming to emerge each week. Such technologies confront instructors and administrators at a time of continued budget retrenchments and rethinking. Adding to this dilemma, bored students are dropping out of online classes while pleading for richer and more engaging online learning experiences.1 Given the demand for online learning, the plethora of online technologies to incorporate into teaching, the budgetary problems, and the opportunities for innovation, we argue that online learning environments are facing a "perfect e-storm," linking pedagogy, technology, and learner needs.2

Considering the extensive turbulence created by the perfect storm surrounding e-learning, it is not surprising that opinions are mixed about the benefits of online teaching and learning in higher education. As illustrated in numerous issues of the Chronicle of Higher Education during the past decade, excitement and enthusiasm for e-learning alternate with a pervasive sense of e-learning gloom, disappointment, bankruptcy and lawsuits, and myriad other contentions.3 Appropriately, the question arises as to where online learning is headed. Navigating online education requires an understanding of the current state and the future direction of online teaching and learning.

The study described here surveyed instructors and administrators in postsecondary institutions, mainly in the United States, to explore future trends of online education. In particular, the study makes predictions regarding the changing roles of online instructors, student expectations and needs related to online learning, pedagogical innovation, and projected technology use in online teaching and learning.

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Building a High-Quality Teaching Profession - Books - OECD iLibrary

Building a High-Quality Teaching Profession - Books - OECD iLibrary | eLearning and research | Scoop.it
This report presents the best current evidence about what can make teacher-oriented reforms effective and points to examples of reforms that have produced spec...
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European report on the future of learning

European report on the future of learning | eLearning and research | Scoop.it

To determine how education and training policy can adequately prepare learners for life in the future society, there is a need to envisage what competences will be relevant and how these will be acquired in 2020-2030. The report identifies key factors for change that emerge at the interface of the visions painted by different stakeholder groups and arranges them into a descriptive vision of the future of learning in 2020-2030. In a second step, the report discusses future solutions to pending challenges for European Education and Training systems and outlines policy options

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Online and Blended Learning: A Survey of Policy and Practice from K-12 Schools Around the World - Online Bookstore - iNACOL

In 2006, the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL) conducted its first international survey, researching how other countries were implementing online and blended learning opportunities for their primary and secondary (K-12) students.

As the pace of growth of online and blended learning has grown at an average of over 30% each year for the past 10 years across the United States, there have been several requests to update the research done from An International Perspective of K-12 Online Learning: A Summary of the 2006 NACOL International E-Learning Survey.1 As a result, iNACOL undertook the project to produce a new report on the international state of K-12 online learning with the assistance of several members of the iNACOL Research Committee.

The collection of the content for this report was made possible through the Atlas Economic Research Foundation to replicate and extend the 2006 International Survey conducted by iNACOL. Atlas worked with current education researchers in over 60 countries to answer several questions about the state of online learning policy and practice for primary and secondary (K-12) students in each country. iNACOL received a total of 50 completed surveys.

The surveys included 23 questions that were thematically focused around the following areas:

Government involvement in online learning in areas such as planning, finance, and leadership
Numbers of students taking courses online and the geographic areas served
Instructor professional development
Quality standards for courses and supportive services
Challenges for online learning
Technology used by students

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UNESCO ICT competency Framework for Teachers

The UNESCO ICT competency Framework for Teachers aims to help countries develop comprehensive national ICT competency policies and standards as an important component of an overall ICT in education strategy.

The Framework is part of UNESCO’s effort to incorporate technology skills into school curricula, increase the ability of students, citizens, and the workforce to use knowledge to add value to society and the economy, and increase the ability of students, citizens, and the workforce to innovate, produce new knowledge, and benefit from this new knowledge.

The Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova, launched the new publication on 31 October at UNESCO Headquarters alongside Sir John Daniel, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth of Learning; François Ledoux, Corporate Affairs Manager of Intel Corporation; Paul Heneveld, Director of Microsoft Corporation’s United Nations Programmes; Janis Karklins, UNESCO’s Assistant Director General for Communication and Information; and Qian Tang, UNESCO’s Assistant Director-General for Education.

 

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002134/213475E.pdf

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Tweeting for teachers

How can social media support teacher professional development?

 

http://pearsoncpl.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Tweeting-for-teachers.pdf

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Medición de las tic's en educación

DOCUmENTO TéCNICO Nº 2MEDICIÓN DE LAS TECNOLOGÍAS DE LA INFORMACIÓNY LA COMUNICACIÓN (TIC) EN EDUCACIÓN -MANUAL DEL USUARIO...

Via Jairo Acosta Solano, Adriana Favieri, Ana Rodera
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Access to scientific publications should be a fundamental right

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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, October 31, 2011 12:22 AM
Absolutely agree!
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Comparison of 1:1 and 1:m CSCL environment for collaborative concept mappingjcal_421

This paper reports an investigation into the effects of collaborative concept mapping in a digital learning environment, in terms of students’ overall learning gains, knowledge retention, quality of student artefacts (the collaboratively created concept maps), interactive patterns, and learning perceptions. Sixty-four 12-year-old students from two 6th grade classes (32 from each class) participated in the study. Guided by the methodology of quasi-experimental research, group scribbles 1.0 was adopted in which students carried out collaborative concept mapping activities for social studies in two different settings: (1) 1:1 (one-device-per-student) – students working in pairs with one Tablet PC assigned to each of them; and (2) 1:m (one-device-tomany-students) – multiple students sharing a Tablet PC. Both settings were evaluated and the interactional patterns of the student groups’ concept mapping were identified. The results indicated that in both 1:1 and 1:m settings, students had improved their learning results and retention. Nevertheless, while 1:1 groups had demonstrated more consistency in group participation, improved communication and interaction, the 1:m groups had instead generated superior artefacts as all the notes were well discussed among the group members. The findings suggest that a higher quality of collaborative processes does not necessarily lead to improved student artefacts

 

 

http://nhcuer.lib.nhcue.edu.tw/bitstream/392440000Q/4557/1/1+JCAL.pdf

 

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