Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education
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Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education
The many dimensions of Digital Learning - edtech, eLearning, blended, authentic, online
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University of Adelaide is phasing out lectures

University of Adelaide is phasing out lectures | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
University of Adelaide is phasing out lectures in favour of online learning and small-group discovery.
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Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, January 5, 2016 4:05 AM

University of Adelaide is phasing out lectures in favour of online learning and small-group discovery.

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Students prefer good lectures over the latest technology in class | University Affairs

Students prefer good lectures over the latest technology in class | University Affairs | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Survey of 15,000 Quebec university students shows they’re “old school” when it comes to teaching technology.

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Making Interactive Lectures

Making Interactive Lectures | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

This module on Interactive Lectures provides strategies and specific examples of techniques and activities designed to involve students in large and small lecture-based classes. The module is designed for the instructor who does not want to replace lecture, but rather to enhance and punctuate lecture to create an interactive classroom experience


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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, August 9, 2012 9:44 AM
Interactive lectures can increase student engagement with course material and facilitate learning. In traditional lectures, the majority of class time is devoted to the instructor’s delivery of information. During interactive lectures, the instructor interrupts the lecture to allow time for short activities.
These activities can take on many forms as discussed later, but they are important in that they allow students to use material learned in class and contribute to their own learning.During lecture breaks, the instructor poses a question or problem that promotes students to actively work with the concepts learned in class. Because learners tend to retain information based on their involvement in the learning process, transforming students from passive receivers of information into active users of information leads to increases in student retention of material.
The idea of incorporating activities within lecture time is often met with the criticism that it wastes time that could be used to cover additional course material. However, sustained lectures that exceed the typical attention span of 10-20 minutes do not ensure that the material is actually reaching students. In fact, students record in their notes a greater percentage of material from short lecture segments than they do from longer lectures. Many of the activities described below take only a few minutes to implement, but still provide important learning opportunities for students.Another benefit of using activities within lectures is that it can create a feedback loop for instructors to get information about student learning earlier than the exam or major assignment date. Seeing students struggle with an activity can be the stimulus for the instructor to review important concepts related to that activity.
In recent years, the lecture has fallen on hard times.
Prominent researchers have raised doubts about its use, claiming that lectures rely on rote learning and fail to promote active engagement. Yet most of us have either attended or delivered wonderful lectures—lectures that have expanded our thinking, provided fresh insights, or opened our eyes to new worlds. Clearly, lectures can be an efficient way of transmitting large amounts of information in a relatively small amount of time.
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Eye-Tracking Study Finds Students' Attentiveness Depends on Location, Location, Location - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Eye-Tracking Study Finds Students' Attentiveness Depends on Location, Location, Location - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The conventional wisdom among educators that students’ attention tends to drift off after 15 minutes is wrong, according to a new study conducted with eye-tracking devices.

 

The study, conducted by David Rosengrant, an assistant professor of physics education at Kennesaw State University, found no pattern in when students become distracted. Instead, students’ focus waxes and wanes throughout a lecture and is strongly affected by factors such as where in the lecture hall the student is sitting.

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10 Ways Twitter Is Reinventing the College Lecture - Online Universities

10 Ways Twitter Is Reinventing the College Lecture - Online Universities | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Gone is the time when PowerPoint was the most impressive communication technology in the lecture hall.
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Why lectures are dead (or soon will be)

Why lectures are dead (or soon will be) | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
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LLZ Uni Halle's curator insight, July 31, 2014 3:27 AM

"(...) There are two important conclusions from the research: 1. Even for the sole purpose for which lectures may be effective – the transmission of information – the 50 minute lecture needs to be well organized, with frequent opportunities for student questions and discussion. (Bligh provides excellent suggestions on how to do this in his book.) 2. For all other important learning activities, such as developing critical thinking, deep understanding, and application of knowledge – the kind of skills needed in a digital age – lectures are ineffective. Other forms of teaching and learning – such as opportunities for discussion and student activities – are necessary. (...)"

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'Pirate' captivates his students

'Pirate' captivates his students | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
WHEN James Arvanitakis's students go online for one of his lectures, they won't get a dull recording.
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Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques | Harvard Magazine Mar-Apr 2012

Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques | Harvard Magazine Mar-Apr 2012 | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Active learning may overthrow the style of teaching that has ruled universities for 600 years.
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10 New Ways Twitter Is Changing The College Lecture | Edudemic

10 New Ways Twitter Is Changing The College Lecture | Edudemic | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Via Online Universities

From the website

 

"Gone is the time when PowerPoint was the most impressive communication technology in the lecture hall. These days, students and professors enjoy the power of Twitter, a tool that allows for digital discussions to supplement and even guide lecture sessions. So how exactly is Twitter changing the college lecture as we know it? Read on to find out about 10 different ways."

 

KF: The backchannel has become a popular feature of academic conferences over recent years. The basic structure of the backchannel is a behind the scenes discussion of the presentation by attendees and remote participants who are interested in a topic or speaker. The backchannel has a well-documented decade-long history and has become a core component of many conferences. The invention of the #hashtag (a form of metadata on live social media) means that conference participants can post and follow discussion points using social media like Twitter. Similarly, these tools can be utilised to provide a platform for learners in the traditional "delivery" context of lectures and large classes. 


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University lectures are a legacy of our pre-digital past

University lectures are a legacy of our pre-digital past | Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Imagine sitting in a crowd of 1000 or so students in a university lecture hall and not understanding something. Do you ask a question or do you just zone out and log onto Facebook instead?

 

Outside our university lecture halls, the rest of the world is in the grips of a digital communications revolution offering an ever increasing number of options for truly engaging, personalised learning.

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