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Humor in Bilingual Couples

Humor in Bilingual Couples | El bilinguismo | Scoop.it
How bilingual couples partake in humorous talk (El humor en parejas interculturales... http://t.co/wRkrsAGW)

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Sam Moriarty's comment, March 19, 2014 9:42 PM
This article is very interesting. When I studied abroad in Sevilla, one of my friends started dating a Spaniard. Even though they both spoke English and Spanish, they almost always spoke in Spanish. She mentioned to us that she noticed a development in her sense of humor in Spanish.
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Johnson: Do different languages confer different personalities?

Johnson: Do different languages confer different personalities? | El bilinguismo | Scoop.it
LAST week, Johnson took a look at some of the advantages of bilingualism. These include better performance at tasks involving "executive function" (which involve the... (Es filosofía del lenguaje...

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Learning for love: romance through the language barrier - Telegraph

Learning for love: romance through the language barrier - Telegraph | El bilinguismo | Scoop.it
Learning your partner's native language can bring bilingual couples closer – but there are plenty of roadblocks to avoid, says Anne Merritt.

Via Planet Veritas - Language News, Communicaid
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Planet Veritas - Language News's curator insight, June 5, 2013 9:53 AM

We've always thought that romance is the best motivation for language learning :)
Beware, though! "The course of true love never did run smooth"; yet, you've got to love the challenge! 

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How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World | NPR.org

How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World | NPR.org | El bilinguismo | Scoop.it

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right. She says the difference lines in language. Boroditsky, an associate professor of cognitive science at the University of California, San Diego, says the Australian aboriginal language doesn't use words like left or right. It uses compass points, so they say things like "that girl to the east of you is my sister." If you want to learn another language and become fluent, you may have to change the way you behave in small but sometimes significant ways, specifically how you sort things into categories and what you notice. Researchers are starting to study how those changes happen, says Aneta Pavlenko, a professor of applied linguistics at Temple University. She studies bilingualism and is the author of an upcoming book on this work. If people speaking different languages need to group or observe things differently, then bilinguals ought to switch focus depending on the language they use. That's exactly the case, according to Pavlenko. For example, she says English distinguishes between cups and glasses, but in Russian, the difference between chashka (cup) and stakan (glass) is based on shape, not material. Based on her research, she started teaching future language teachers how to help their English-speaking students group things in Russian. If English-speaking students of Russian had to sort cups and glasses into different piles, then re-sort into chashka and stakan, they should sort them differently. She says language teachers could do activities like this with their students instead of just memorizing words. Click headline to read more--


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