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System developed that uses a big data approach to personalized healthcare

System developed that uses a big data approach to personalized healthcare | eHealth | Scoop.it

University of Notre Dame researchers have developed a computer-aided method that uses electronic medical records to offer the promise of rapid advances toward personalized health care, disease management and wellness.

 

Notre Dame computer science professor Nitesh V. Chawla and his doctoral student, Darcy A. Davis, developed the system called Collaborative Assessment and Recommendation Engine (CARE) for personalized disease risk predictions and wellbeing.

 

"The potential for 'personalizing' health care from a disease prevention, disease management and therapeutics perspective is increasing," Chawla said. "Health care informatics and advanced analytics, or data science, may contribute to this shift from population-based evidence for health care decision-making to the fusion of population and individual based evidence in health care. The key question is: how to leverage health population data to drive patient-centered health care?"

 

At the heart of CARE is a novel collaborative filtering method that captures patient similarities and produces personalized disease risk profiles for individuals. Using what is known as Big Data science, the system generates predictions focused on other diseases that are based on Big Data from similar patients.

 

"In its most conservative use, the CARE rankings can provide reminders for conditions that busy doctors may have overlooked," Chawla said. "Utilized to its full potential, CARE can be used to explore broader disease histories, suggest previously unconsidered concerns, and facilitate discussion about early testing and prevention, as well as wellness strategies that may ring a more familiar bell with an individual and are essentially doable.

 

"We believe that our work can lead to reduced re-admission rates, improved quality of care ratings and can demonstrate meaningful use, impact personal and population health, and push forward the discussion and impact on the patient-centered paradigm."

 

Chawla points out that the core premise of CARE is centered on patient empowerment and patient engagement.

 
Via nrip
Martijn Verver's insight:

De belofte van Big Data is groot wat mij betreft. Zeker in de gezondheidszorg kan dit nog wel eens een omslag in het behandelen van een patiënt gaan betekenen. Maar hoe zorg je ervoor dat je gebruik kunt maken van de bevolkingsgegevens over gezondheid om patientgerichte zorg kunt leveren?

 

Onderzoekers van de Univeristy of Notre Dame hebben een comutergestuurd systeem ontwikkeld (CARE) dat op basis van 'big data' uit electronische patiëntendossiers overeenkomsten tussen patiënten kan uitrekenen en op die manier toch de belofte van gepersonaliseerde gezondheidszorg in zich draagt.

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Tandheelkunde omarmt 3D printen

Tandheelkunde omarmt 3D printen | eHealth | Scoop.it

3D-printen is hip, maar in de wereld van de tandheelkunde is het feitelijk oud nieuws. De eerste geprinte kroon dateert al uit 1985 en steeds vaker wordt in de tandheelkunde de overstap naar een digitaal werkproces gemaakt. De mond wordt 3D gescand en noodzakelijke toevoegingen, een kroon, een gebitsprothese of een beugel, kunnen eenvoudig worden geprint. Sneller en preciezer dan handwerk. 

Bron: De Digitale Zorggids


Via Leonieke Daalder
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5 ways Google Glass can be used in a hospital

5 ways Google Glass can be used in a hospital | eHealth | Scoop.it

I believe that clinicians can successfully use Google Glass to improve quality, safety, and efficiency in a manner that is less bothersome to the patients.

 

Few examples:

 

1. Meaningful use stage 2 for hospitals. Electronic medication admission records must include the use of “assistive technology” to ensure the right dose of the right medication is given via the right route to the right patient at the right time.  Imagine that a nurse puts on a pair of glasses, walks in the room and Wi-Fi geolocation shows the nurse a picture of the patient in the room who should be receiving medications.  Then, pictures of the medications will be shown one at a time.  The temple touch user interface could be used to scroll through medication pictures and even indicate that they were administered.

 

2.  Clinical documentation. All of us are trying hard to document the clinical encounter using templates, macros, voice recognition, natural language processing and clinical documentation improvement tools.     However, our documentation models may misalign with the ways patients communicate and doctors conceptualize medical information per Ross Koppel’s excellent JAMIA article.  Maybe the best clinical documentation is real time video of the patient encounter, captured from the vantage point of the clinician’s Google Glass.   Every audio/visual cue that the clinician sees and hears will be faithfully recorded.

 

3.  Emergency department dashboards.   Imagine that a clinician enters the room of a patient – instead of reaching for a keyboard or even an iPad, the clinician looks at the patient.   In “tricorder” like fashion, vital signs, triage details, and nursing documentation appear in the Google Glass.   Touching the temple brings up lab and radiology results.  An entire ED dashboard is easily reduced to visual cues in Google Glass.    At BIDMC, we hope to pilot such an application this year.

 

4.  Decision support.  Imagine that a clinician responding to a cardiac arrest uses Google glass to retrieve the appropriate decision support for the patient in question and visually sees a decision tree that incorporates optimal doses of medications, the EKG of the patient, and vital signs.

 

5.  Alerts and reminders.   Imagine that Google Glass displays those events and issues which are most critical, requiring action today (alerts) and those issues which are generally good for the wellness of the patient (reminders).    Having the benefits of alerts and reminders enables a clinician to get done what is most important.


Via nrip, IIG_HEG
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Dominique Dock's comment, August 22, 2013 6:13 AM
Am I glad I'm not too old at 60, to be able to embrace that technology and combine it with my clinical experience of 32 years !
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System developed that uses a big data approach to personalized healthcare

System developed that uses a big data approach to personalized healthcare | eHealth | Scoop.it

University of Notre Dame researchers have developed a computer-aided method that uses electronic medical records to offer the promise of rapid advances toward personalized health care, disease management and wellness.

 

Notre Dame computer science professor Nitesh V. Chawla and his doctoral student, Darcy A. Davis, developed the system called Collaborative Assessment and Recommendation Engine (CARE) for personalized disease risk predictions and wellbeing.

 

"The potential for 'personalizing' health care from a disease prevention, disease management and therapeutics perspective is increasing," Chawla said. "Health care informatics and advanced analytics, or data science, may contribute to this shift from population-based evidence for health care decision-making to the fusion of population and individual based evidence in health care. The key question is: how to leverage health population data to drive patient-centered health care?"

 

At the heart of CARE is a novel collaborative filtering method that captures patient similarities and produces personalized disease risk profiles for individuals. Using what is known as Big Data science, the system generates predictions focused on other diseases that are based on Big Data from similar patients.

 

"In its most conservative use, the CARE rankings can provide reminders for conditions that busy doctors may have overlooked," Chawla said. "Utilized to its full potential, CARE can be used to explore broader disease histories, suggest previously unconsidered concerns, and facilitate discussion about early testing and prevention, as well as wellness strategies that may ring a more familiar bell with an individual and are essentially doable.

 

"We believe that our work can lead to reduced re-admission rates, improved quality of care ratings and can demonstrate meaningful use, impact personal and population health, and push forward the discussion and impact on the patient-centered paradigm."

 

Chawla points out that the core premise of CARE is centered on patient empowerment and patient engagement.

 
Via nrip
Martijn Verver's insight:

De belofte van Big Data is groot wat mij betreft. Zeker in de gezondheidszorg kan dit nog wel eens een omslag in het behandelen van een patiënt gaan betekenen. Maar hoe zorg je ervoor dat je gebruik kunt maken van de bevolkingsgegevens over gezondheid om patientgerichte zorg kunt leveren?

 

Onderzoekers van de Univeristy of Notre Dame hebben een comutergestuurd systeem ontwikkeld (CARE) dat op basis van 'big data' uit electronische patiëntendossiers overeenkomsten tussen patiënten kan uitrekenen en op die manier toch de belofte van gepersonaliseerde gezondheidszorg in zich draagt.

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e-Health Sensor Platform Complete Kit V2.0 for Arduino and Raspberry Pi [Biometric / Medical Applications]

e-Health Sensor Platform Complete Kit V2.0 for Arduino and Raspberry Pi [Biometric / Medical Applications] | eHealth | Scoop.it
Featured in:    and  The e-Health Sensor Shield allows Arduino and Raspberry Pi users to perform biometric and medical applications where body monitoring is needed by using 9 different sensors. This information can be used to monitor in real time...
Martijn Verver's insight:

Bouw zelf je wearable device met deze Arduino sensor-kit

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App op maat - huisarts kan per patiënt specifieke parameters instellen #QS

App op maat - huisarts kan per patiënt specifieke parameters instellen #QS | eHealth | Scoop.it
Het bedrijf Synappz heeft op een ICT-congres een concept gepresenteerd, waarmee de dokter een app op maat kan maken voor …
Martijn Verver's insight:

Een app op maat voor elke patiënt. De huisarts bepaalt welke meetwaarden van belang zijn voor goede monitoring en behandeling van zijn patiënt. Dat betekent dat iedere patiënt zijn eigen specifieke app krijgt. Mooie ontwikkeling!

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Could wearable technology help support the human side of the relationship in the exam room and beyond?

Could wearable technology help support the human side of the relationship in the exam room and beyond? | eHealth | Scoop.it

These are images from the Google Glass Tech Focus that we filmed at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health on July 11, 2013 , which are actually mockups because Google Glass can’t do this automatically .. yet.

 

Now that I’ve had some time to work with Glass, I can see a situation where a QR code might be presented on the exam room monitor or somewhere else in the workflow to allow the practitioner quick access to electronic health record details, or of course through voice commands (but I think QR might be quicker..).

 

There is a lot of discussion about using Glass for surgery and high tech health care (and there’s nothing wrong with that, I love surgeons and was trained by excellent ones as a family physician), so we created a scenario that involves using technology to connect us to patients better.

 

 


Via nrip
Martijn Verver's insight:

Her en der duikt Google Glass op in de operatiekamers. Het Raboudziekenhuis had de Nederlandse primeur. In de berichtgeving werd de nadruk gelegd op hoe de studenten, die anders onhandig over een schouder mee moeten kijken, nu 'met de ogen van de chirurg' de operatie op een scherm veel beter konden volgen. En dat allemaal dankzij Google Glass.. Vijftien jaar geleden konden we al een internetpersoonlijkheid 34 uur per dag volgen, omdat hij een camera op zijn hoofd had geplakt en live alles wat hij zag de wereld in streamde. Google Glass biedt hier dus geen toegevoegde waarde behalve wellicht draagcomfort.

 

Wat ook naar voren komt in het filmpje waarin Lucien Engelen wordt geïnterviewd naar voren komt, is juist de interactiviteit die Goolge Glass zo baanbrekend maakt. Het dossier met een paar woorden opvraagbaar. En in dit artikel vertelt een huisarts hoe het ook de interactie met de patient beter, menselijker kan maken. Door bijvoorbeeld informatie over iemands familie tevoorschijn te kunnen toveren en eventuele klachten ook te kunnen relateren aan de thuissituatie of levensstijl.

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Jennifer Jackson's curator insight, August 19, 2013 12:14 PM

not sure I'm a believer yet, but I'm hopeful that applications for Glass will support healthcare beyond just another EHR reader...

nrip's comment, August 21, 2013 9:23 AM
@jennifer I am sure of that. The whole process of EMRization of healthcare is but a 1st step in bringing technology in to help healthcare. And as all first steps of most things in life.. it is the one which is difficult, painful and most criticized. I know it could have been done better, but whats more important is whether the next set of steps will start helping out doctors and patients more directly and without inflicting so much pain as the EMR transition did.