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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Les travailleurs des transports en grève pour cause d'injustice dans les salaires

Les travailleurs des transports en grève pour cause d'injustice dans les salaires | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

By ABDEL-WAHEB AL-GENDY

CAIRO: Sabry Abdel-Azim, chairman of the Independent Union for Workers in the Transport Authority, said on Sunday that the transport workers strike is due to being marginalized by the state because their salaries are considered the lowest in the state.

Abdel-Azim added in an interview with the Al-Hayat television channel that the government is treating workers unfairly because the transport employee’s salary is 400 EGP at maximum.

Transport workers began a partial strike a few days ago to demand a seven percent bonus in addition to the adoption of hazard pay for workers.

Originally published in Youm7.

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Get a move on:Africa’s booming economy needs modern trade route (Egypt extracts)

Get a move on:Africa’s booming economy needs modern trade route (Egypt extracts) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

UNLESS you take to the air or the high seas, the only reasonably safe passage from north Africa to the rest of the continent is a weekly ferry on a lake on the eastern edge of the Sahara. The few roads that cross the vast desert are either broken or infested with kidnappers. So every Monday morning a horde of turbaned migrants lines up at a concrete pier in the southern Egyptian city of Aswan on Lake Nasser, a dammed-up bit of the Nile, for the overnight journey of 500km (300-odd miles) to Wadi Halfa in northern Sudan. They bring carpets from Cairo, bubble-wrapped fridges from Tripoli and bicycles bought with wages earned in Algiers. All are stowed in the white steel hull of the 30-metre-long good ship Sinai—and around her engine and in the stairways and under the lifeboats and in the lifeboats; every surface is covered with bags, parcels and boxes. (...)

 

Transport is a perpetual problem in Africa. Potholed roads and missing rail links get in the way of economic growth(...)

 

Some trade paths are improving. Governments are slowly making good on long-standing promises to create free-trade zones. (...)

 

Roads are being built. Aswan and Wadi Halfa will soon be connected by a double-lane tarmac highway with its own border terminal, the first dependable road across the Sahara. It will link to a brand new 1,000km-long desert road going south to Khartoum along the green banks of the Nile.

 

Africa needs much more of this. The continent could easily end hunger if only farmers were able to get produce across borders, according to a new World Bank report, “Africa Can Help Feed Africa”. (...)

 

Parts of the corridor already exist. Citadel Capital is running 42 barges along the length of the Nile in Egypt and has built or refurbished seven river-ports between Alexandria and Aswan, mostly to ship grain, coal, slag and clay. Two years ago it carried the first-ever shipping container on the Nile, long neglected as a transport route. Even though 95% of Egyptians live by the river, less than 1% of the goods they need are moved on it. In Sudan Citadel Capital has struck a deal with the government to use the state-owned rail network, and in South Sudan it operates 12 barges on the Nile to move supplies for oil companies and the World Food Programme.(...)

 

These investments were made possible by privatisations and the opening of markets once dominated by state-owned enterprises. But governments can still be an unwelcome presence. Egypt’s barge business loses money because the state subsidises fuel, giving road transport a competitive advantage. Egyptians pay only $0.15 for a litre of diesel, at great expense to their exchequer. (...)

 

Like many investors in Africa, [Citadel Capital] also faces political problems. The revolution in Egypt has messed up management of the Nile: new officials are withholding navigational charts from barge captains and allowing water levels to sink as low as 60cm

 

More on: http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21571920-africas-booming-economy-needs-modern-trade-routes-get-move

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