Égypt-actus
408.6K views | +60 today
Follow
Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
Curated by Egypt-actus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Ramy Essam, "la voix de la place Tahrir" : la Révolution n'est pas à vendre.

Ramy Essam, "la voix de la place Tahrir" : la Révolution n'est pas à vendre. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

He has been arrested, beaten and even tortured by the Egyptian military forces after a concert in Cairo. Three years before the Arab spring, Ramy Essam, a former architecture student, had already begun writing political songs, trying to make a name for himself in the musical industry. Raised in Mansoura, the Egyptian rocker left his city in 2011 to join the protests in Cairo. He quickly became the voice of Tahrir Square. Called the singer of the revolution in the media, his song Irhal made him famous and became Tahrir’s anthem during the 18 days of the January 25 revolution. However, when he decided to take to the streets to participate in Hosni Mubarak’s fall, Essam wasn’t going to bring his guitar. “But my brother and a friend said ‘You must bring it. You have songs. You can help the people,”’ he told the New York Times.

On March 9, 2011, the army rounded up group of protestors Essam was with. Because his face was already known, he became the target of police aggression. “Normally one army officer would torture a group of people, but I had a group of officers just on me,” he remembers. “They called me by name and knew that I was there as a symbol so they stripped me down and electrocuted me.” Eight months later, on November 2011, the Egyptian singer won the Swedish Freemuse Award and received it a ceremony in Stockholm. But it was difficult for him to be proud of the award while the protests raged on in Cairo. “It’s very hard to be here when everything is happening in the square,” he told journalists at the time.

Three years later, Essam isn’t in Tahrir anymore. But he hasn’t stopped singing, and above all, he’s remained true to himself. On the eve of the anniversary of the revolution, he released a video on YouTube. “Mahnach men dol” (We don’t belong to them), a rock song, attacks everybody: the army, the Muslim brotherhood, and the remnants of the old regime. "I criticize all the politicians," Ramy explains, "especially Sisi, because he is the strongest … Now the famous actors and singers who supported Mubarak before the revolution are supporting him,” he declares, disgusted. But he doesn’t belong to them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Certaines révoltes prennent plus de temps. 2014 sera une année décisive pour le changement dans le monde arabe.

Certaines révoltes prennent plus de temps. 2014 sera une année décisive pour le changement dans le monde arabe. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

By Karim El-Gawhary 

Three years ago, a joke did the rounds on Cairo's Tahrir Square. "Somebody told Mubarak that the people wanted to say goodbye to him. And Mubarak asked: Why? Where are they going?" It was of course Egypt's President Mubarak who eventually took his leave; the people stayed, initially brimming with hope, which has in the meantime been replaced by a heavy dose of disappointment.
In the West too, word soon got out that the Arab Spring had degenerated into an Ice Age. We in Europe often feel more than a little malice when we consider our neighbours on the southern and eastern shores of the Mediterranean, and we often like to pass judgment on what is happening there: "once again, the Arabs and Muslims couldn't get their act together; they are simply incapable of democracy".
Apparently, everything went wrong. A civil war is raging in Syria; a war that neither Bashar al-Assad nor the rebels are winning. Politically polarised, Egypt has reached a dead end, where the military hopes to at least impose a graveyard peace. (...)
The belief that political and social processes follow the logic of the seasons is a myth. The Arab world is in the midst of a sea change. It all revolves around two major lines of political conflict: for one, the dispute between Islamists and liberals over the role of religion in politics. For decades, dictatorial regimes violently suppressed this debate. With their overthrow, the battle has now erupted in full force, as it arguably had to, because it is long overdue.
Arab societies need to negotiate what role religion should play in the state, in politics and in the law. Nowhere is there a social consensus on this issue, instead only two polarised camps that ultimately have to find a compromise. Whether this will happen with or without a bloody intermezzo remains to be seen.
The Tunisians have made the most progress in negotiating this conflict. They have not only formed a government of national unity, but have also managed the feat of agreeing on a constitution that can be considered progressive for the region.
In contrast, Egypt seems like a hopeless case, with the Muslim Brotherhood first using their electoral victory to single-handedly write a constitution while completely excluding the other side. Now, the other side is trying to do the same with the help of tanks.
After years of dictatorship, change in the Arab world has largely been hampered by political inexperience. Each side believes it can outsmart the other. There is no tradition of democratically negotiated compromise here.
 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte : l'impact de trois années de révolution sur un photojournaliste

Three years after a popular uprising ousted Hosni Mubarak, as Egypt witnesses a volatile transitional period, EgyptSource looks at how these events have affe...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Trois ans après la chute de Moubarak, que reste-t-il de la révolution ?

Trois ans après la chute de Moubarak, que reste-t-il de la révolution ? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Qu'en est-il de la révolution du Nil trois ans après la chute de Moubarak ? Les correspondants de FRANCE 24 en Égypte ont rencontré certains révolutionnaires, dont les trajectoires ont été très différentes depuis 2011.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Les principaux acteurs de la Révolution du 25 janvier 2011 : Où sont-ils maintenant?

Les principaux acteurs de la Révolution du 25 janvier 2011 : Où sont-ils maintenant? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

On the third anniversary of Egypt’s 2011 revolution, Al Arabiya News looks at what happened to those who were at the core of the movement that toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak.

1. Mohammad ElBaradei
2. Ahmed Maher
3. Wael Ghoneim
4. Mohammad Hussein Tantawi
5. Ahmed Shafiq
6. Mohammad Badie.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte: les révolutionnaires de 2011 dans l’engrenage de la répression

Egypte: les révolutionnaires de 2011 dans l’engrenage de la répression | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Par Daniel Vallot
C'est le samedi 25 janvier 2014 que l'Egypte célébrera le troisième anniversaire de sa révolution, et de la chute de Hosni Moubarak. Anniversaire très attendu, par toutes les forces politiques égyptiennes, qui tentent de capter l'héritage de cette révolution, malgré tout ce qui les divise depuis la chute de Mohamed Morsi en juillet 2013. 
Il y a d'un côté les partisans de l'armée, et du Général Sissi ; et de l'autre, les Frères musulmans, déclarés organisation terroriste, et brutalement réprimés par le pouvoir en place. Il y a enfin les révolutionnaires de la première heure : réprimés à leur tour par les autorités égyptiennes, ils dénoncent la dérive autoritaire du pouvoir actuel, bien loin des aspirations de la révolution.

Ecouter :http://telechargement.rfi.fr.edgesuite.net/rfi/francais/audio/magazines/r168/grand_reportage_20140124_0537.mp3

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Trois ans après Tahrir, l'Egypte a-t-elle changé ?

Trois ans après Tahrir, l'Egypte a-t-elle changé ? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

On January 25, Egyptians mark the third anniversary of the revolution that ended decades of a repressive regime -- and that many heralded as the beginning of a transition to democracy.  
 
But three years after millions of Egyptians rose up and overthrew Hosni Mubarak, a general-turned- president, the country seems set to back another general, Abdel Fatah el Sissi, as his successor.
 
That leaves many asking how much, if anything, has changed?

There is more violence, including a series of bombings in Cairo, one day before the anniversary - which makes General Sissi all the more popular with many Egyptians, who long for stability after all the turmoil.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Une histoire alternative de la Révolution égyptienne.

Une histoire alternative de la Révolution égyptienne. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It will soon be the third anniversary of the Egyptian revolution. There will be a flood of articles and opinions about where Egypt stands today, where it might be heading and the significance of various events. Blame will be assigned, pity will be sought, anger will be vented and in proper order events will overtake all views. If the last three years were an epic film, then perhaps a fanciful rewrite is not out of order. Let us then imagine how these years might have unfolded if the revolutionaries had taken a different road. 

If the revolutionaries were a hard-headed bunch, or less romantic, they might have seen the removal of President Hosni Mubarak as small game. They would have set their sights higher on a transformation of Egypt and its narrowing social, intellectual and political horizons. Aside from Mubarak’s resignation, the demands of January 25 were vague. Vague demands elicit empty promises. Let us imagine that the demands were specific and limited. A vote on constitutional amendments within thirty days limiting the presidency to two terms and prohibiting the transition of the office between two people related in the first degree by blood or marriage, a sunset clause on any invocation of emergency laws, and a stipulation that any constitutional amendments are enacted by a vote of at least two-thirds of the participants and that they be no closer than one year apart. These are hardly stirring revolutionary requests, but they are a revolution in disguise, and more importantly, an orderly one. Egypt needs a transformation of society and politics, but not an unruly one.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte: l'armée, mise en cause dans un rapport, dément des exactions

Egypte: l'armée, mise en cause dans un rapport, dément des exactions | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le président Mohamed Morsi et le chef de l'armée égyptienne ont démenti que les militaires aient commis des meurtres ou des exactions depuis la révolte de début 2011 contre le régime de Hosni Moubarak, après des fuites d'un rapport mettant en cause des soldats.

"Les forces armées sont sincères et n'ont commis aucun acte contre le peuple égyptien depuis le 25 janvier 2011 (date du début du soulèvement) et n'ont tué personne comme certains le prétendent", a affirmé le ministre de la Défense, le général Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, cité vendredi par l'agence officielle Mena.

La veille au soir, le président islamiste, flanqué de hauts gradés, a promu trois responsables militaires, dans une manifestation de soutien très ostensible à l'armée.

M. Morsi a voulu "apaiser la situation et dissiper les tensions qui règnent dans l'armée, consécutives à une campagne diffamatoire et aux attaques de la part de certains politiciens", a rapporté la Mena.

 

Plus:http://quebec.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/04/12/egypte-larme-mise-en-_n_3068637.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte : l'armée a réprimé la révolution

Egypte : l'armée a réprimé la révolution | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Un rapport publié par un journal britannique confirme le rôle des militaires dans la disparition de dizaines de révolutionnaires. 

 

«Le peuple et l'armée, d'une seule main!» Le slogan était scandé sur tous les tons, pendant les 18 Jours, cette période entre le 25 janvier et le 11 février 2011 qui a vu les manifestations sur la place Tahrir déboucher sur la chute de Hosni Moubarak.

La réalité est différente. L'armée a bel et bien participé à la répression de la révolution, pendant les 18 Jours - sans compter les nombreux morts de la période de transition, jusqu'aux élections présidentielles. C'est ce que révèle un rapport de 800 pages, publié par le journal britannique The Guardian. C'est le président égyptien lui-même qui avait désigné un comité d'experts en juillet 2012 pour enquêter sur les crimes de la révolution.

  

Le document confirme 68 disparitions - mais sous-entend qu'il ne s'agit là que de la partie émergée de l'iceberg. Une autre organisation, Hanlaihom (Nous les retrouverons) parle elle de 1200 disparus.

Des cartes sim aux abords d'une caserne

Certains épisodes précis ont été détaillés. Comme un check-point au sud du Caire, près des pyramides de Dahshour, où quatre personnes auraient disparu fin janvier. Certains d'entre eux ont été retrouvés dans les morgues du Caire, leurs corps marqués de traces de tortures.


Des prisonniers ont été transférés dans une caserne de la police égyptienne Djebel el-Ahmar. Leur trace a été retrouvée grâce aux cartes sim de leurs téléphones portables, négligemment jetées aux abords de la caserne, et récupérées par les habitants des environs.

 

Plus: http://www.lefigaro.fr/international/2013/04/11/01003-20130411ARTFIG00588-egypte-l-armee-a-reprime-la-revolution.php

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt's new economy excludes the poor

Egypt's new economy excludes the poor | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s 25 January Revolution produced few economic benefits for the country’s poor even though they were instrumental in overthrowing the old order.

The Muslim Brotherhood has other economic priorities, including pushing measures that further economic liberalization in Egypt.

Given the Egyptian media’s focus, it might be difficult to believe that Egypt’s 25 January 2011 Revolution was not one of the educated middle class. On the TV screen, these shiny young faces appear on talk shows, portrayed as the leaders of the revolution.

But 28 January 2011’s “Friday of Anger” belonged to the marginalized who – using the tricks they learned in their daily battles with the state apparatus in the slums – were able to defeat the police forces. Regardless, the media see the revolution differently: “This is the revolution of dignity and not of the hungry,” they say.

This discourse paved the way for state repression of social demands. It even reached a point where the media began depicting Egypt's working class– those that bolstered the revolution’s ranks with its mass mobilizations – of deliberately aiding the counter-revolution through strikes that hurt the economy. (...)

Post-Revolution, Little Help for the Poor

Even before the revolution, experts close to the ruling National Democratic Party saw signs of unrest rooted in growing poverty. This was clear in the First Investment Report: Towards a Fair Distribution of the Fruits of Growth prepared by the General Investment Authority in 2009, which warned of sharply rising poverty rates.

 

More on: http://www.albawaba.com/business/egypt-economy-unemployment-479976

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Haniyeh appelle les jeunes arabes à protéger leurs révolutions des complots

Haniyeh appelle les jeunes arabes à protéger leurs révolutions des complots | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le chef du gouvernement palestinien de Gaza, Ismaïl Haniyeh, a appelé "les jeunes arabes qui se sont soulevés contre les régimes despotiques, à préserver les acquis de leurs révolutions et à œuvrer à participer à la construction de leur pays, afin qu’ils se consacrent à la libération de la Palestine, et d’al-Qods contre l’occupation israélienne", signalant que les révolutions arabes sont aux prises avec plusieurs défis, rapporte le site de felesteen.ps.  

"Parmi les défis auxquels font face les révolutions arabes figurent l’héritage de la corruption des régimes corrompus, les médias qui propagent des mensonges, les complots et les ingérences extérieures", a-t-il déclaré lors d’un congrès sur "les jeunes et la cause palestinienne à l'ombre du printemps arabe", organisé par le groupe islamique à Gaza.(gnet)


Plus : http://www.gnet.tn/revue-de-presse-internationale/haniyeh-appelle-les-jeunes-arabes-a-proteger-leurs-revolutions-des-complots/id-menu-957.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

La révolution égyptienne se poursuit, mais sans perspective

La révolution égyptienne se poursuit, mais sans perspective | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Deux années après le renversement de Moubarak, la crise politique et sociale à l’origine du soulèvement populaire s’approfondit. Le processus révolutionnaire est loin d’être achevé, mais aucune alternative politique sérieuse n’émerge face aux résidus de l’ancien régime et au gouvernement islamiste du président Morsi. C’est l’impasse…Les affrontements politiques violents se poursuivent en Egypte sur fond de désobéissance de la police, de résistance de la Justice et d’impuissance du président et du gouvernement à répondre aux principales attentes de la population. Les changements politiques intervenus jusqu’ici ainsi que les diverses élections pluralistes tenues depuis le départ du dictateur n’ont pas réglé la crise politique. Celle-ci s’approfondit.

La crise politique se caractérise par plusieurs éléments : une situation de double-pouvoir au sein du régime, une poursuite de la contestation politique du président par les oppositions démocrate et révolutionnaire et une persistance des luttes sociales. Cette crise politique se déroule sur fond de marasme économique duquel l’Egypte n’arrive pas à s’extirper.

La situation de double-pouvoir oppose de manière feutrée, au sein même du régime, le président et son gouvernement à une partie des anciens du régime de Moubarak retranchés dans la police, l’armée, la justice et l’administration. Et ce, en dépit du récent appel de Moubarak à soutenir Morsi. Fraichement élu, ce dernier avait gagné ses premières batailles en mettant les dirigeants du Conseil des forces armées à la retraite et en limogeant le procureur général d’Egypte… Mais ces victoires partielles n’ont pas mis fin à l’opposition d’un certain nombre de secteurs du régime rétifs aux tentatives des Frères musulmans d’instaurer leur pouvoir.

La justice, par le biais du tribunal administratif du Caire, a ainsi reporté les législatives convoquées pour le 22 avril par le président Morsi afin de renouveler l’assemblée nationale dissoute en juin 2012. Le tribunal a jugé la procédure présidentielle non conforme à la Constitution. Le président et ses partisans ne se sont pas opposés à cette décision. Le tribunal a par ailleurs renvoyé la loi électorale devant la Haute cour constitutionnelle (HCC), pour examen.
Egypt-actus's insight:
La crise politique perdureLe gouvernement Morsi doit également faire face à la fronde de la police qui a suspendu son travail. Les policiers revendiquent la non-utilisation de la police à des fins politiques, le limogeage du ministre de l’Intérieur Mohamed Ibrahim, des armes pour permettre aux policiers de se défendre… Ils reprochent au gouvernement de les envoyer désarmés au-devant des manifestants (opposants, syndicalistes, supporters de football…). Plus: http://www.lanation.info/La-revolution-egyptienne-se-poursuit-mais-sans-perspective_a2026.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Quatre artistes racontent la révolution égyptienne

Quatre artistes racontent la révolution égyptienne | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Trois ans après la chute de Moubarak, « Le Monde » a demandé à des artistes égyptiens de raconter leurs espoirs et leurs craintes.

 

- Andeel, caricaturiste et scénariste, né en 1986
- Youssra el Hawary, chanteuse, née en 1983
- Huda Lutfi, artiste plasticienne, née en 1948
- Ahmed Hefnawy, dessinateur et plasticien, né en 1978

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Nabil Fahmi :"Nous ne retournons pas en arrière, mais la transition est longue et demande du temps."

Nabil Fahmi :"Nous ne retournons pas en arrière, mais la transition est longue et demande du temps." | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

«Voi europei vi dite perplessi per quel che accade in Egitto? Ma questo mi conforta perché forse iniziate a percepire l’enorme complessità, le difficoltà della transizione nel mio Paese. Tutti vorremmo che filasse alla perfezione e in un battibaleno, ma neppure da voi storicamente è andata così». Nabil Fahmi, il ministro degli Esteri egiziano in visita ufficiale a Roma - le lenti da intellettuale, ex blogger sull’Huffington Post - ha l’accento di chi è nato e vissuto in America per oltre un ventennio, e l’abitudine di frequentare la dialettica democratica.
.../...
"...in Egitto è in corso un cambiamento epocale. Non si tratta di cambiare soltanto un presidente o un governo; l’intera società sta cercando di definire, nientemeno, la propria identità nel Ventunesimo secolo, e in cui tutte le parti siano rappresentate. Ma certo, lungo il percorso abbiamo commesso errori e altri ne compiremo."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Sur la jeunesse égyptienne et la possibilité d'une autre révolution

It is unclear what caused the increase in youth participation in pro-Morsi demonstrations but one of the very possible reasons could be the number of young people who were either killed by the police or unjustly sent to jail since the army ousted Mohamed Morsi following the massive anti-Brotherhood protests on June 30, 2013. Four Cairo University students were killed on campus so far; that never happened since the day Princess Fatma Ismael decided to donate her jewelry pieces to fund the foundation of Cairo University around 100 years ago. Three other students were killed in Al Azhar University, also on campus. These eight students are just a fraction of the number of young people who were killed during demonstrations; a few of them were not even supporters of the Brotherhood. Sayed Weza, 19, a member of the Tamarod movement that was pivotal in ousting Morsi from power, chose to demonstrate against the current regime during the third anniversary of the January 25th revolution. He was gunned down by a police officer in downtown Cairo. Kill or imprison a young person, and his/her Facebook friends will take to the streets against you.

While the number of youth in the pro-Morsi demonstration is an interesting development worth of analysis, I’m not claiming that Egypt’s youth have shifted to the pro-Morsi or the pro-Brotherhood camp. In spite of the Brotherhood’s popularity loss due to their dreadful year in power, pro-Morsi are still violently doing things like preventing other students from taking exams, storming exam classrooms and instigating clashes with the police forcing them to enter the university campuses. The majority of youth are not becoming pro-Morsi, they’re becoming pro-apathy. That was evident  in the latest referendum that a considerable portion of youth – especially in the urban areas – have boycotted.

It seems that Egypt’s urban youth -the ones who triggered the revolution – are mostly becoming politically apathetic; a smaller minority is joining the pro-Morsi camp. What could such a development yield in the future, let’s say after three or four years?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte : trois ans après la révolution, un anniversaire au goût amer

Egypte : trois ans après la révolution, un anniversaire au goût amer | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it


Depuis le renversement du président Frère musulman Mohamed Morsi par l'armée en juillet 2013, le ministère de l'intérieur, avec l'assentiment des militaires aux manettes, a retrouvé de sa superbe. La police s'attaque sans relâche et dans un esprit de revanche non dissimulé à toute forme d'opposition. Une répression aveugle soutenue par une large frange de la population, galvanisée par une rhétorique d'incitation à la haine et à la xénophobie diffusée par la quasi-totalité des médias.

« C'est horrible, je n'arrive pas à croire ce que je vois ! On ne peut même pas descendre dans la rue. Il suffit que tu sois pris pour un révolutionnaire ou un Frère musulman et tu te fais attaquer ! Même quand tu es journaliste, même quand tu n'es pas contre le régime, tu es en danger ! », poursuit Naïra, rongée par l'angoisse. « Je n'en peux plus ! C'est trop dur. Je ne veux pas me faire arrêter ! (...)
Le bilan est donc lourd pour cette troisième commémoration de la révolution. Il y a trois ans, les affrontements entre les forces de police et les manifestants avaient fait moins de dix victimes. « Quand on parle de meurtre, c'est toujours l'Etat qui gagne. Le nombre de morts liés à la violence policière aujourd'hui est plus élevé que le nombre de morts dus aux attentats de vendredi », conclut une activiste, sur son fil Twitter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Ces militants de la révolte qui dénoncent « un coup d’État contre la révolution » ...

Ces militants de la révolte qui dénoncent « un coup d’État contre la révolution » ... | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Ils étaient admirés en Égypte pour avoir fait chuter Hosni Moubarak en 2011. Certains de ces « jeunes de la révolution » sont aujourd'hui en prison et d'autres ont été tués dans la répression menée par un pouvoir dont les méthodes leur rappellent tristement celles du régime contre lequel ils s'étaient révoltés.


Certes, le pouvoir dirigé par les militaires depuis qu'ils ont destitué le 3 juillet 2013 le président islamiste Mohammad Morsi, a réprimé dans le sang les manifestations pro-Morsi mais, depuis peu, il s'en prend aux jeunes libéraux et laïcs issu de la révolte anti-Moubarak quand ils contestent ses méthodes dans la rue.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Une célébration de la révolution au goût amer

Une célébration de la révolution au goût amer | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Y a-t-il encore du sens à manifester le 25 janvier ? A la veille du troisième anniversaire de la révolution égyptienne, de nombreux activistes se posent la question, non sans sans amertume. Les quatre attentats de la journée, visant principalement des intérêts policiers, vont sans doute les en dissuader un peu plus. Ces révolutionnaires de la première heure avaient prévu de descendre dans la rue demain, non tant pour célébrer l'événement, que pour rappeler qu'ils existent encore et qu'ils s'opposent au nouveau régime et à sa politique répressive. En marge des arrestations des Frères Musulmans, plusieurs figures du 25 janvier ont été condamnées : le blogueur Alaa Abdel Fatah ou le leader du mouvement 6 avril, Ahmed Maher pour ne citer qu'eux.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Anniversaire dans le sang d'une révolution jamais accomplie.

Anniversaire dans le sang d'une révolution jamais accomplie. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Un anniversario macchiato di sangue, quello che si appresta a vivere l'Egitto. A tre anni esatti dalla “rivoluzione del 25 gennaio” che costrinse l'ex presidente Hosnu Mubarak a dare le dimissioni, il Cairo è stato colpito da 3 violenti attentati che, secondo un primo bilancio fornito dalla tv di Stato, hanno causato 5 morti e 91 feriti. (...)
Intanto, a seguito delle esplosioni, le misure di sicurezza sono state massicciamente rafforzate nella capitale, all'aeroporto internazionale, nel distretto di Giza, al ministero dell'Interno e davanti a tutte le ambascite occidentali: secondo quanto riferito dal quotidiano egiziano Al Masry Al Youm, è inoltre stato di massima allerta in tutte le province del Paese, con 10mila agenti e 50 squadre di pronto intervento schierate per scongiurare altri eventuali attacchi.
Quelli di oggi, ha sottolineato il premier Hazem el-Beblawi, “sono tentativi vili e disperati da parte di forze terroristiche malvage per vanificare il successo che l'Egitto e il suo popolo hanno conseguito nell'attuare la transizione, e nell'approvare la nuova Costituzione”.
Una Costituzione sottoposta a referendum e votata dal 98% delle persone, nonostante l'affluenza sia stata molto più bassa del previsto (38%): un apparente piccolo passo in avanti che non riesce però a nascondere un Paese tutt'oggi lacerato, preda di differenze inconciliabili e di un difficile passaggio di poteri, eredità di quella primavera araba di cui non si riesce ancora a cogliere i frutti.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'esprit Tahrir

L'esprit Tahrir | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Trois ans après le soulèvement de la place Tahrir en Égypte, il peut être tentant pour les esprits chagrins de dire que la révolution a été un échec. La vérité, c'est qu'il est beaucoup trop tôt pour le dire.

«On ne saura pas avant plusieurs décennies si la révolution a réussi. Les objectifs de cette révolution (pain, liberté, justice sociale, dignité...), il faudra plus de deux ans pour les réaliser. On ne peut que jeter les fondements du changement.»

Ces sages paroles sont de Khalid Abdalla, acteur britannique d'origine égyptienne que l'on a pu voir dans Les cerfs-volants de Kaboul. Il fait partie de ces manifestants de la place Tahrir que l'excellent documentaire The Square, en nomination pour un Oscar, nous invite à suivre. Fils d'un militant qui a dû s'exiler après avoir été emprisonné en Égypte, il devient, dans cette poignante oeuvre de cinéma-vérité, l'un des acteurs d'un film révolutionnaire qui le dépasse et dont la suite reste à écrire.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egyptian doctors 'ordered to operate on protesters without anaesthetic'

Egyptian doctors 'ordered to operate on protesters without anaesthetic' | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Exclusive: Leaked presidential report recommends an investigation into the highest echelons of the army leadership .

Senior Egyptian army doctors were ordered to operate without anaesthetic on wounded protesters at a military hospital in Cairo during protests against military rule, according to an investigation commissioned by president Mohamed Morsi. The report into military and police malpractice since 2011 also alleges that doctors, soldiers and medics assaulted protesters inside the hospital.

The findings, which relate to the army's behaviour during the Abbassiya clashes in May 2012, are the latest leak to the Guardian of a suppressed report investigating human rights abuses in Egypt since the start of the 2011 uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak. Earlier leaks alleged that the military were involved in torture, killings and forced disappearances during the uprising.

The new chapter contains testimony from doctors and protesters about the treatment of injured demonstrators at the Kobri el-Qoba military hospital in Cairo in May 2012.

It alleges that a senior military doctor ordered subordinates to operate on wounded protesters without anaesthetic or sterilisation and reports that doctors, nurses and senior officers also beat some of the wounded protesters. It also claims that a senior officer ordered soldiers to lock protesters in a basement.

The chapter concludes by recommending an investigation into the highest echelons of the army leadership – a deeply significant development. Even though the report has not been officially published, its status as a presidential document – coupled with the extent of its conclusions – represents the first acknowledgment by the state of the scale of the atrocities both during and since the 2011 uprising.

"I can't overestimate the importance of this report," said Heba Morayef, the director of Human Rights Watch in Egypt. "It's incredibly important. Until today, there has been no official state acknowledgement of excessive force on the part of the police or military.

 

More on: http://m.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/apr/11/egypt-doctors-operate-protesters-anaesthetic?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'Egypte depuis la chute de Hosni Moubarak

L'Egypte depuis la chute de Hosni Moubarak | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Dates-clés de l'Egypte depuis la chute en février 2011 du régime de Hosni Moubarak, après 30 ans d'un règne sans partage.

 

--2011--

- 11 fév: Hosni Moubarak démissionne et remet ses pouvoirs au Conseil suprême des forces armées (CSFA), dirigé par le maréchal Hussein Tantaoui, au 18e jour d'une révolte populaire. Les violences ont fait près de 850 morts.

L'armée promet une "transition pacifique" vers "un pouvoir civil élu", puis suspend la Constitution et dissout le Parlement.

- 19 mars: Les Egyptiens votent massivement "oui" lors d'un référendum sur la révision de la Constitution, validant une transition vers un pouvoir civil élu.

- 13 avr: Moubarak placé en détention préventive dans un hôpital de Charm el-Cheikh (Sinaï, est). Il sera transféré au Caire début août, au moment du début de son procès.

 

Plus: http://quebec.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/04/11/legypte-depuis-la-chute-_n_3059840.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

ليه الشغب؟ ?Why Riot

Help us caption and translate this video on Amara.org: http://www.amara.org/en/v/Bi0K/ أكثر من عامين على بداية الثورة ولاتزال دولة القمع والظلم تحكم. تتغير ا...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

AP EXCLUSIVE: Police blamed in Egypt revolt deaths

AP EXCLUSIVE: Police blamed in Egypt revolt deaths | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The highest-level inquiry to date into the deaths of nearly 900 protesters during Egypt's 2011 uprising has concluded police were behind nearly all the killings and used snipers on rooftops overlooking Cairo's central Tahrir Square to shoot into the huge crowds.

 

The report, parts of which were obtained by The Associated Press, is the most authoritative and sweeping account of the killings and determines the deadly force used could only have been authorized by ousted President Hosni Mubarak's security chief, with the president's full knowledge.

 

The report's findings could weigh heavily in the upcoming retrial of Mubarak, his security chief — former Interior Minister Habib el-Adly — and six top police commanders. It is likely to also fuel calls for reforming the security forces and lead to prosecutions of policemen.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/ap-exclusive-police-blamed-egypt-revolt-deaths-173430983.html

more...
No comment yet.