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revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Les journalistes en Egypte ont de plus en plus recours à Internet à la recherche d'une plus grande liberté d'expression

Les journalistes en Egypte ont de plus en plus recours à Internet à la recherche d'une plus grande liberté d'expression | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

By: Mai Shams El-Din
As the boundaries of the analogue world of network television and print journalism seem to keep tightening, journalists in Egypt are increasingly fleeing to the Internet in search of greater freedoms, either through personal blogs or more institutionalized media outlets.
And with most mainstream media — whether state-run or privately owned — marching to the beat of the same drum, readers are also going online in search of diversity.
New media outlets like Qoll, Noon Post and Yanair Gate, among others, were born in recent months in reaction against the mainstream media’s increased subservience to the authorities at the expense of journalistic independence.
(...)
"Till now we have no headquarters. We have our laptops and stay wherever there is a place that has access to the Internet. But we are in the process of legalizing our work. Once we become registered, I know we will be monitored, and we are preparing ourselves for that."

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Indice de liberté de la presse : l'Égypte se classe 159e sur 180

Indice de liberté de la presse : l'Égypte se classe 159e sur 180 | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

 Egypt ranked 159th out of 180 nations in the 2014 Press Freedom Index by Reporters without Borders released Feb. 11.

Down one position from 2013, Egypt has not improved since the rise of media control asserted by former President Mohamed Morsi or his removal by Maj. Gen. Abdel Fatah al-Sisi.  Calling it a transition from “Brotherization” to “Sisification,” Reporters without Borders said the interim government has “systematically targeted” foreign and domestic media affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood, with 5 journalists killed and 80 arbitrarily detained in only the second half of 2013.

The new constitution approved by referendum in January 2014 guarantees a host of new media freedoms, but many of these rights have not yet been secured by the state, as the index reports that “arbitrary arrest and torture is now common”

Since the start of the Arab Spring, Egypt has dropped significantly, from its position at 127th in 2010 to 166th in 2011/2012, seeing only a slight rise in the previous two years.

Syria, which ranked 177th, above only Turkmenistan, North Korea, and Eritrea, saw 130 journalists killed in 2013.

The U.S. also fell 13 places, ranking 46th, for its crackdown on whistleblowers and the extended yet illegal reach afforded national security agencies to mine information. The trial and conviction of Private Chelsea Manning and the continued pursuit of state-contracted analyst Edward Snowden have been clear warnings against revealing any information to media, according to the index.

Finland, the Netherlands, and Norway ranked first, second, and third, respectively, for the second successive year.

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La liberté de la presse a dramatiquement décliné en 2013 en Egypte, selon le Comité de Protection des Journalistes

La liberté de la presse a dramatiquement décliné en 2013 en Egypte, selon le Comité de Protection des Journalistes | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

“Perhaps nowhere did press freedom decline more dramatically in 2013 than Egypt,” said the 2013 risk list issued Thursday by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

The list highlighted 10 countries where the media work environment suffered the biggest decline in 2013. However, according to the release, they are not the worst press freedom offenders.

According to CPJ’s release, Egypt was the third deadliest place for journalists after Syria and Iraq, where state-sponsored censorship exists, in addition to the killing of journalists.

CPJ documented at least 78 assaults against journalists in Egypt since August, 2013, until former President Mohamed Morsi’s ouster in July, 2013. The Muslim Brotherhood supporters were responsible for 72 of them, said the release.

The release noted that the press’s status in Egypt was greatly affected by the ouster of Morsi, where pro-Muslim Brotherhood news outlets were closed or heavily censored.

Further, foreign news organizations that were seen as unsympathetic to the military regime, like CNN and Al-Jazeera, were harassed.

At least five journalists were killed, 30 assaulted, 11 news outlets raided, 44 journalists detained, and five remained in jail in late 2013, added the release.

 
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Il y a un seul côté de l'histoire en Egypte : la ligne gouvernementale

Il y a un seul côté de l'histoire en Egypte : la ligne gouvernementale | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The case of the Al Jazeera journalists sends a chilling message to journalists that there is a high price to pay for giving the Muslim Brotherhood a voice. A journalist working for a private pro-government Arabic daily sarcastly told Index that there is only one side to the story in Egypt: the government line. Mosa’ab El Shamy, a photojournalist whose brother is one of the defendants in the Al Jazeera case posted an article this week on the website Buzzfeed, humorously titled: If you want to get arrested in Egypt, work as a journalist.

In truth though, the case is no laughing matter. National Public Radio’s Cairo Correspondent Leila Fadel said it shows just how far Egypt has backslid on the goals of the January 2011 uprising when pro-democracy protesters had demanded greater freedom of expression. Today, violations against press freedoms in Egypt are the worst in decades, according to the New York-based Committee for the Protection of Journalists. Sadly, it does not look like the situation for journalists in Egypt will improve anytime soon.

In the meantime the fate of the Al Jazeera journalists hangs in the balance.

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Egypt's Morsi Drops Complaints Against Journalists

Egypt's Morsi Drops Complaints Against Journalists | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has ordered the withdrawal of legal complaints filed by the presidency against journalists, in a move that appeared aimed at fending off accusations of a crackdown on dissent by the Islamist-led authorities.
Morsi withdrew the complaints out of respect for freedom of expression, according to presidential spokesman Ehab Fahmy.
Morsi is under international pressure to work for consensus and stability while Egypt seeks aid from the International Monetary Fund to ease an economic crisis. On Monday his government appeared to be heeding some of the concerns of the liberal and leftist opposition by announcing moves to amend the new constitution.
However, the latest legal move does not apply to complaints filed independently by Morsi loyalists against journalists and media figures.

These include complaints that led to an arrest warrant being issued against the popular satirist Bassem Youssef. He is accused of insulting the president and Islam in a probe that has added to concern inside and outside Egypt about freedom of expression in the post-Hosni Mubarak era.


Voice of America

More : http://www.voanews.com/content/egypt_morsi_drops_complaints_against_journalists/1638938.html?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=t.co

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Arab press group laments persecution of journalists

Arab press group laments persecution of journalists | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Arab Journalists Union on Monday lamented legal threats and restrictions affecting reporters working in the region, particularly in Egypt and Tunisia.

The AJU "denounces legal proceedings targeting journalists in all Arab countries and expresses solidarity with colleagues in Egypt and Tunisia," it said in a final declaration following a meeting in the Mauritanian capital Nouakchott.

The AJU said journalists in the Arab Spring countries were frequently prosecuted and jailed, saying the uprisings should have led instead to a strengthening of press freedoms.

The body said Egyptian journalists were prevented from working freely and condemned "legal proceedings that have affected some of them". It similarly condemned Tunisia, calling for authorities there to guarantee freedom of the press.


The Daily Star
More : http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2013/Apr-09/213083-arab-press-group-laments-persecution-of-journalists.ashx?#axzz2Pwls2Ujp

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Post-Arab Spring censorship on the rise | DW (Egypt extracts)

Post-Arab Spring censorship on the rise | DW (Egypt extracts) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

More journalists, bloggers, musicians and other public figures are increasingly being summoned to court in an apparent crackdown on freedom of expression in Egypt and Tunisia. But they're not going without a fight.

Egyptian TV satirist Bassem Youssef, who has been compared with United States news parody show host Jon Stewart, this past week had to answer to Egyptian prosecutors over charges of insulting Islam and President Morsi. (...) Youssef still faces other, similar charges.

 

The fall of dictatorial regimes after the Arab Spring apparently hasn't brought about any durable guarantees for freedom of expression. On the contrary, there seems to be an offensive against free speech in North Africa - yet this is being met with resistance, and the world is looking on.

 

'Judicial harassment'

Human rights groups note an increase in court cases charging religious defamation. Amnesty International researcher Diana Eltahawy cited an offensive targeting 33 activists, bloggers and politicians over the past few weeks. This represents increasing "judicial harassment" of those leveling political or societal critique, Eltahawy told DW.

 

This comes despite the new Egyptian constitution guaranteeing freedom of expression. Clauses about defamation opened a legal grey area that certain forces are trying to exploit to muzzle criticism, also in the form of satire.

 

Eltahawy pointed out that many of the legal challenges are filed by regular individuals or Islamist lawyers. Slander of political figures and denigration of religious values are the primary charges.

But the state prosecution has ultimate say in the matter, Eltahawy added. "They can make the decision not to press charges, not to refer the matters to court," she said. Though it should be defending free speech, instead "the public prosecutor is increasingly charging individuals for freely expressing themselves," Eltahawy said.(...)

 

Not without a fight

But attempts to gag freedom of expression are facing resistance. Eltahawy described a local outcry and demonstrations of support for those facing charges for their critical opinions. "People didn't take to the streets to ask for an end of repression and tolerance for dissent, to only be faced with this again now," she explained.

A support committee has been established for persecuted rapper Weld El 15, while the "Graffiti is not a crime" group on Facebook is drumming up support for Zwewla. And when Youssef and other prominent entertainers are brought in for questioning, their court appearances are accompanied by masses of supporters.

Meanwhile, media provide extensive coverage of the events. Such persecution has itself become a focus of attention, for example when Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohamed ElBaradei sharply critized the Youssef legal challenges. Via Twitter, the opposition leader declared such questioning as the kind seen in "fascist regimes." (...)

 

More on: http://www.dw.de/post-arab-spring-censorship-on-the-rise/a-16725701

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Egypt's Journalists Syndicate chairman refuses to appear in appeals court

Egypt's Journalists Syndicate chairman refuses to appear in appeals court | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s Journalists Syndicate board deputy chairman Gamal Fahmy refused to appear in front of the Court of Appeal on Tuesday.

 

The Appeals Prosecution was scheduled to investigate a report against Fahmy for "publishing false news that threatens national security."(...)

 

Fahmy is accused of publishing the intentional killing of El-Hosseiny Abou-Deif during clashes outside of Cairo’s presidential palace in December 2012.

 

Abou-Deif passed away in the same month, following a one-week coma after being shot by an unknown assailant at the clashes.

 

More on: http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/67795/Egypt/Politics-/Egypts-Journalists-Syndicate-chairman-refuses-to-a.aspx

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Une journaliste accusée de “promotion du terrorisme”

Une journaliste accusée de “promotion du terrorisme” | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Reporters sans frontières exprime sa vive inquiétude quant aux poursuites lancées à l’encontre de la journaliste Dina Abdel Fattah, un cas révélateur de la dégradation de la liberté de l’information dans le pays.

Présentatrice de l’émission politique “Al-Shaab Yourid” (“Le peuple veut”) diffusée sur la chaîne Al-Tahrir, la journaliste fait l’objet d’une enquête pour avoir fait venir sur le plateau de son émission des membres des “Black Bloc”, un mouvement de protestation né récemment, devenu la bête noire des autorités égyptiennes. Dina Abdel Fattah a été convoquée par le bureau du Procureur général pour un interrogatoire le 10 février 2013, en compagnie de son collègue le journaliste Khairi Hassan, l’un des producteurs de l’émission. Ils ont tous deux été relâchés le jour-même, moyennant une caution de 5 000 livres égyptiennes (570 euros) chacun, versée par le syndicat des journalistes.

Le Procureur a ouvert une enquête pour “promotion du terrorisme”, affirmant avoir reçu alors 238 plaintes contre la journaliste dans cette même affaire. Des membres du Conseil de la Shura (la Chambre du Parlement), qui ont dénoncé l’émission, la qualifiant de “menace pour l’ordre public” et “d’incitation au vandalisme”, ont également déposé plainte. De nombreux journalistes, ONG et avocats ont aussitôt pris la défense de la journaliste.

Reporters sans frontières exige l’abandon de l’enquête visant Dina Abdel Fattah. “Nous dénonçons les mesures liberticides prises par l’administration égyptienne à l’encontre des professionnels des médias. Ces derniers doivent pouvoir couvrir les nouveaux mouvements de protestation qui secouent le pays, que cela plaise aux autorités ou non. Bâillonner la presse renforce l’instabilité. Depuis l’élection de Mohamed Morsi, le nombre de plaintes à l’encontre de journalistes a littéralement explosé. Les enquêtes et procès visent clairement à restreindre la liberté de l’information. Nous demandons aux autorités de mettre un terme à la politique de répression vis-à-vis des journalistes et acteurs de l’information”, a déclaré l’organisation.

Le 24 février dernier, après l’annulation de son programme “Al-Shaab Yourid” par la direction de la chaîne, Dina Abdel Fattah a annoncé sa démission, entendant ainsi protester contre la violation de la liberté de l’information dont elle est victime. D’après le président du Syndicat Egyptien des Médias, Al-Sayed El-Shazli, il est probable que les autorités aient intimé l’ordre à la direction d’Al-Tahrir de ne pas diffuser l’émission.

La chaîne égyptienne, née au lendemain de la révolution de 2011, avait à ses débuts l’ambition d’incarner les aspirations des révolutions arabes. Elle a pourtant connu un changement de sa politique éditoriale, et perdu dans le même temps certaines de ses figures emblématiques, qui ont toutes choisi de démissionner : Mahmoud Saad, Belal Fadl, Amr El-Leithy, Hamdy Kandeel, Doaa Sultan,Ibrahim Eissa, Dina Abdel Rahman et enfin Dina Abdel Fattah.

Reporters sans frontières rappelle que l’Egypte est classée 158ème sur 179 pays dans le classement mondial de la liberté de la presse publié par l’organisation cette année.

 http://fr.rsf.org/egypte-une-journaliste-accusee-de-14-03-2013,44208.html
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The Brotherhood vs. the Free Press - By Hani Shukrallah

The Brotherhood vs. the Free Press - By Hani Shukrallah | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A tiny editorial team, made up of myself and two marvelous colleagues, had been setting it up for months. We had started from scratch: When we began, there was no office space or computers, and extremely inadequate technical backup.

 

We were the newest addition to the plethora of media products published by the country's largest state-owned media organization -- some 18 newspapers, magazines, and journals, including the flagship daily, Al-Ahram. As such, we warranted minimal resources -- we were just a speck amid the mega-organization's bloated bureaucracy, which even now employs nearly 2,000 journalists and thousands of administrators and workers. Even the enthusiastic support of the then newly appointed chairman of the al-Ahram organization -- a modernizer who hailed from a scholarly background -- could do little to overcome the hurdles of ineptitude and wastefulness that had solidified over decades.

But despite it all, we had a deadline to meet. Parliamentary elections were at hand, and I resolved that Ahram's new English-language news portal would begin with a bang. At the time, this was as exciting as Egypt's dreary political life got: I was convinced the vote would be disastrous, and I was soon proved right. Hosni Mubarak's ruling clique had decided that the Muslim Brotherhood, which had won an unprecedented 88 seats in the 2005 elections, had overstayed its welcome, and manipulated the constitution to muscle the Islamist group out of the next parliament. (...)

 

At one point, the editor of the flagship Arabic daily, al-Ahram, appeared at the door of our newsroom, asking to see me. "I just had [then Interior Minister, Habib] El-Adly on the phone with me, complaining that Ahram Online is making a scandal of the elections, and that foreign correspondents are tagging behind Ahram Online and rushing to polling stations where you report violence or irregularities," he told me.

 

The censure by management went so far as to objecting to the words "blow-by-blow" on our live blog, which they saw as implying violence. I made a half-hearted attempt to explain the English idiom, but was happy to concede the point, changing the words to "minute-by-minute." (...)

 

And herein lies the secret of my intermittent survival in Ahram, as managing editor and then chief editor of the English-language al-Ahram Weekly (from 1991 to 2005) and Ahram Online (from January 2010 to January 2013): I rarely take political differences personally. And I never interested myself in bureaucratic politics. (...)

 

More on: http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/03/01/the_brotherhood_vs_the_free_press

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The Triple Threat to Egyptian Press Freedom

The Triple Threat to Egyptian Press Freedom | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood, an intrusive state bureaucracy, and a dangerously deflated economy all endanger the country's newly-open media environment.

 

As the Arab uprisings continue, war and state repression aren't the only threats to free expression.Egypt in the last week saw two other factors impinging on the independent media: bad finances and malignant bureaucracy. They pose a potent threat that could drastically worsen the dimming prospects for a transition away from authoritarianism.

 

The traditional print media's business model has suffered all over the world, and Arab countries undergoing political transitions are not immune. Throw into the mix the fact that bloated state agencies control many of the major publishing conglomerates and television networks, and you have a gargantuan set of problems above and beyond efforts by the government to punish dissent and restrict speech (read my recent Internationalist column in The Boston Globe for more about Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi's exertions on that front).

 

This week, the dismal economics of the print media nearly forced the closure of the Egypt Independent, one of the best sources of critical and feature reportage about Egypt. The editors were told this week that their paper, formerly known as Al Masry Al Youm English, would be closed because it loses too much money. They persuaded management to give them a stay of execution while they made their publication financially viable, but it seems only a matter of time before they face the prospect of closure again. (Another English-language paper, The Daily News Egypt, folded in 2012 although investors have since brought it back.)

 

Meanwhile, the dismal values of the Muslim Brotherhood's media commissioners have driven out the editor of Al Ahram Online, an odd bright spot of breaking news and dissenting journalism that thrived, in English, within the otherwise moribund state publishing conglomerate. Ahram Online's editor Hani Shukrallah is a secular leftist with Christian origins. He was forced into early retirement by the new Ahram supervisors put in place by the Muslim Brotherhood. (...)

 

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

The English-language local press served an important function before the uprisings that broke out two years ago. Its reporters had more leeway than the Arabic press, and pushed boundaries in their reporting on torture, corruption and incompetent governance. (...)

 

Ahram Online might revert to regime control, but that's not irreversible. It could be a temporary setback in a multi-year transition. If Egypt Independent closes, many of its talented journalists will have to seek employment elsewhere or leave journalism - but the publication could be resuscitated by an angel investor (...)

 

More on: http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/02/the-triple-threat-to-egyptian-press-freedom/273303/

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"A final goodbye to Ahram", by Hani Shukrallah

"A final goodbye to Ahram", by Hani Shukrallah | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

"The deed is done: the MB has now fulfilled its resolve to drive me out of Ahram. It began with cutting my salary in half (the first act of the then new MB chairman); I hung one. Then came my forcible retirement (3 years too early in the case of a chief editor, which I had been); I hung on, pushing for Ahram Online managing editor, the wonderful Fouad Mansour, to take my place (telling my staff that I'd be Vito Corleone -after he was shot- to Fouad's Michael). Then they moved on the remaining half of my salary, cutting that by two thirds (whereby I was now getting paid less than the most junior of my staff) - and one and half month later, no decision to appoint Fouad as my successor. Just today I found out that in a meeting with a committee formed by Ahram Online staff to negotiate with the management, they were told that my status was "too complicated", and that (despite previous denials that it'd all been a bureaucratic mistake) the third of one half would remain in place, while my connection with Ahram Online would depend on the wishes of the new editor (who's yet to be named). The object of course is humiliation. Which simply shows how stupid they are. 
So now, I bid a final goodbye to Ahram. I do so with zero savings, own nothing, and will have to sell my car (to pay back Ahram what I owe on it). But fools! I have something immeasurably more precious: my dignity and self-respect. What do you have?"

https://www.facebook.com/hani.shukrallah.1/posts/606150136077502

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State TV presenter interrogated for asking Qandil about torture

State TV presenter interrogated for asking Qandil about torture | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Information Minister Salah Abdel Maqsoud referred a state TV presenter to interrogations after the presenter asked the prime minister about dragging citizens and torturing them in the streets during a live news conference, state TV sources told Al-Masry Al-Youm.

State TV attempted to mute the sound when the presenter, Ahmed Abdel Aziz, raised the question with Prime Minister Hesham Qandil, who responded by telling Abdel Aziz not to watch TV too much. (Egypt independent)

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/state-tv-presenter-interrogated-asking-qandil-about-torture?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

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L'État égyptien contre les journalistes : une brève chronologie des violations de la liberté de la presse en Egypte

L'État égyptien contre les journalistes : une brève chronologie des violations de la liberté de la presse en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
By: Mai Shams El-Din

As 20 Al Jazeera journalists stand trial in the Cairo Criminal Court on charges of belonging to a terrorist organization — arguably the most serious escalation against press freedoms since the January 25 revolution erupted — Mada Masr presents a brief timeline of the most striking violations committed against journalists from January 25, 2011 to the post-Morsi era.

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Le ministre des Affaires étrangères se termine sa tournée européenne au milieu de fortes critiques à propos de la liberté de la presse

Le ministre des Affaires étrangères se termine sa tournée européenne au milieu de fortes critiques à propos de la liberté de la presse | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Minister of Foreign Affairs Nabil Fahmy told Dutch media that Egypt is open to foreign journalists as long as they work within Egyptian law.

Speaking in a press conference with his Dutch counterpart Frans Timmermans on Thursday in the Netherlands, Fahmy said, “We welcome foreign press, we provide them with assurances of press freedoms and guarantees for their safety, given that they should pursue their efforts [with]in the law.”

Last week, Dutch journalist Rena Netjes departed Egypt following her indictment by the prosecution along with Al-Jazeera journalists and others, dubbed the “Marriott cell” in the prosecution’s statement. They are accused of setting up an illegal media network “to support a terrorist group” among other charges. She was allowed to leave the country following discussions between the Dutch embassy and the Egyptian authorities.

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Les attaques de la part de l'Egypte vis-à-vis des médias n'incitent guère à l'espoir

Les attaques de la part de l'Egypte vis-à-vis des médias n'incitent guère à l'espoir | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Cumulatively, and amid the continuing mass arrests and detentions, these incidents have had a chilling effect on the media. Journalists must now contend with both the threat of being shot, or detained, or attacked by enterprising members of the general public who have it rammed down their throats – by local media – that al-Jazeera and foreign journalists are out to spread chaos in Egypt.

What is most frightening, however, is that both private and public media have chosen to abdicate their duty to question the state's narrative and hold officials to account. The other side of the story, criticism of events since 30 June, rarely appears on the pages of the local press, whether out of a misguided sense of patriotism or because of the red lines that have re-established themselves following a brief hiatus after 2011.

The 30 June revolution, its advocates say, saved Egypt from the Muslim Brotherhood's religious totalitarianism. The question now is whether it has replaced it with something just as bad.

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La "spirale descendante" de la liberté des médias en Egypte

La "spirale descendante" de la liberté des médias en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The terms “banned” and “terrorist” are once again affixed to mention of the Muslim Brotherhood in nearly all Egyptian media. State and private media alike tout themilitary-backed government’s lines. Newspapers and talk shows on TV, Egypt’s most popular medium, extol the military for reclaiming the revolution and sinisterly warn against traitors who dissent. All news and opposing views are vilified as pro-Brotherhood—and therefore dangerous. 

It is no surprise that Egyptian media largely heralded the military’s assent and stayed silent as it cracked down on the Brotherhood and opposition voices: for decades, a toxic mix of political and economic interests have stifled the development of, and respect for, the mechanisms for independent and transparent media. Now, as Egypt passes the three-year mark since Hosni Mubarak’s ouster in 2011, many are bracing for how far this latest crackdown on media freedoms can go. 

 “We are in a downward spiral,” American University of Cairo Mass Communications Professor Rasha Abdulla said by phone from Cairo. “We are back to where we were under the Mubarak era, but now with the support of the masses.”   

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Egypte: une journaliste accusée d'imposer la culture occidentale - RTBF Monde

Egypte: une journaliste accusée d'imposer la culture occidentale - RTBF Monde | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
La correspondante néerlandaise Rena Netjes a été arrêtée lundi soir dans la capitale égyptienne Le Caire, rapportent mardi BNR Nieuwsradio et Het Parool, pour qui travaille notamment la journaliste.


La journaliste réalisait un reportage sur le chômage des jeunes au moment de son arrestation. Selon BNR, elle est accusée "d'espionnage et d'imposition de la culture occidentale aux Egyptiens".

Rena Netjes a passé toute la nuit dans une cellule et s'y trouve encore. La rédaction de BNR cherche à contacter d'autres clients de la journaliste pour évaluer la situation et essaie de lui trouver un avocat.

 

Le ministère néerlandais des Affaires étrangères a confirmé l'arrestation de la journaliste. L'ambassade au Caire est en contact avec elle, a indiqué un porte-parole du département

 

RTBF: http://www.rtbf.be/info/monde/detail_egypte-une-journaliste-accusee-d-imposer-la-culture-occidentale?id=7967525

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Meet the ‘Muslim Anarchist’ Whose Cartoons Are Driving Fundamentalists in Egypt Crazy

Meet the ‘Muslim Anarchist’ Whose Cartoons Are Driving Fundamentalists in Egypt Crazy | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

(...) Cartoonist Dooa Eladl is 34-year-old Egyptian woman who calls herself a Muslim anarchist.  Her work appears in the prominent newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm—Egyptians Today. She has become one of Egypt’s best-known political cartoonists, in a field completely dominated by men. (One of her humorous drawings is a portrait of herself marching to work, her hair tied to the mustaches of four of her male colleagues.)

 

During the Egyptian uprising, Eladl and her colleagues supported the revolution by printing up some of their fiercest political satire, the kind that would not have been published, and handing them out in Tahrir Square. “I don’t think artists like myself should be members of political parties or organizers, but we should certainly use our art to speak out against injustice and oppression.”

 

Eladl’s blistering caricatures have landed her in hot water with some of Egypt’s powerful fundamentalists. She now has the distinction of being the first cartoonist in Egypt to face blasphemy charges. In 2012 Salafi lawyer Khaled El-Masry, Secretary General of a group called National Center for Defense of Freedoms, filed a complaint against her for defaming religious prophets. The cartoon he objected to shows an Egyptian man with angel wings lecturing Adam and Eve. The man is telling Adam and Eve that they would never have been expelled from heaven if they had simply voted in favor of the Brotherhood’s draft constitution in the recent Egyptian referendum. The court has not yet heard the case.

 

More on:http://www.disinfo.com/2013/04/meet-the-muslim-anarchist-whose-cartoons-are-driving-fundamentalists-in-egypt-crazy/

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War of words between US, Egypt over media freedoms

The summoning of popular Egyptian satirist Bassem Youssef to the court has caused a war of words between the US Embassy in Cairo and the Egyptian Presidential Office.

This started when the US Embassy posted a video of American political satirist Jon Steward poking fun of the Egyptian President in defense of Youssef.

The Egyptian satirist was summoned for investigation by the Prosecutor General on charges of insulting President Mohamed Morsi and Islam as well as disturbing public peace.

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Egypt press syndicate accuses presidency of 'intimidating' journalists

The syndicate  issued a statement Monday accusing the presidency of launching a campaign of "intimidation and incitement" against journalists.

The syndicate's statement comes amid ongoing protests against perceived anti-Islamist media bias outside Cairo's Media Production City (MPC), where numerous media outlets are based.

"The situation has reached the extent that top-level authorities are interfering and implementing the campaign," the statement asserts. "This was clearly seen in President Mohamed Morsi's recent address which resembled [government speeches from] the dark eras before the January 25 Revolution."

"Why did the siege on the MPC – which included severe assaults and harassment [of journalists] – come only hours after the president's speech? Is there a linkage between both issues?" the syndicate asked.

The statement went on to stress the Egyptian people's unequivocal right to a free and diverse media, warning against a situation that could lead the country into further into a state of "crisis and resentment."

 

Ahram online

More : http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/67729/Egypt/Politics-/Egypt-press-syndicate-accuses-presidency-of-intimi.aspx

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Egypt daily says offices attacked by vandals

Egypt daily says offices attacked by vandals | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The independent Egyptian newspaper El-Watan reported yesterday that a mob attacked and vandalized its offices in the early morning.

“More than 40 people torched the entrance to the building, stormed it and destroyed its contents,” the daily reported on its website.

The newspaper has been highly critical of the country’s ruling party.

It also recently angered fans of the Cairo Al-Ahly football club — who have protested against the government — by publishing a report that they had held meetings with a senior Muslim Brotherhood member.

El-Watan issued a rare retraction and apology to the Ahly fans yesterday.

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Press explosion in Egypt brewing trouble?, by H.A. Hellyer

Press explosion in Egypt brewing trouble?, by H.A. Hellyer | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Since President Mohammed Mursi, the Muslim Brotherhood candidate, was elected last summer, there have been increasing concerns around the freedom of the press within Egypt. Those concerns suddenly became more pronounced over the last couple of weeks, raising new questions. Those questions go beyond, however, the freedom of the press in Egypt – they also raise other ones about its integrity, as well as its role in a revolutionary transition within this, the Arab world’s most populous country. 

There have been concerns for quite some time around freedom of expression and freedom of the press in Egypt. The new constitution approved last year in an extremely tense vote created a new government press regulator, and reinforced the power of the state to close media outlets. Journalists across the state media have privately, and publicly, called attention to articles they believe were pulled due to being critical of the government. The upper house of parliament, the Shura Council, appointed political allies to the heads of media institutions, and in less than 9 months, the numbers of trials over “insulting the president” has exceeded all those that took place during Mubarak’s entire reign. (...)

After a successful transition, one might hope that all Egyptian state media would be wound up into a BBC-like institution – both in terms of numbers of mediums, as well as in style and approach. Egypt is a far way off from that, however. In the meantime, genuinely pro-revolutionary media probably should find space, somewhere, to be that equivalent of the BBC. A voice that represents all facets of Egyptian society – because no one else will do it. The MB media is not interested; nor is the state media. That, in itself, is actually a very revolutionary move – because it shows, by example, what ought to be the case. If the state can’t – or won’t – do their duty in this regard, pro-revolutionary mediums should take it up instead.

That is not to say that there should not be other types of independent, private voices in the media arena, that are deeply opinionated – on the contrary, at this stage in Egypt’s transition, perhaps most of all, there is a need for continued agitation. That can only happen with such incisive analysis and commentary, which should indeed be as partisan as the authors are. In such endeavors, nonetheless, an emphasis on truth, rather than political success, needs to be first and foremost. 

If one can talk about “revolutionary success” when it comes to the media, it probably has two major elements to it. The first is the pre-eminent emphasis on relying only on the most truthful and trustworthy of sources – regardless of who that benefits or not. The second is fairness – something that probably the most revolutionary of writers, journalists and commentators in Egypt ought to seriously consider themselves as honor bound to uphold, at least until there is serious reform in the state media. Activist media is indeed an integral part of the revolution during its transition – and those two elements are, indeed, deeply embedded within the best kind of activist media. (Al-Arabiya news)


More : http://english.alarabiya.net/views/2013/02/23/267845.html

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Un appel du quotidien "Egypt independent"

Un appel du quotidien "Egypt independent" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Pour pouvoir continuer son travail d'information en toute liberté et indépendanece, le journal "Egypt independent" (al-Masry al-Youm) fait appel à une participation financière de ses lecteurs.

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ANHRI condemns attack on journalists

The Arab Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) condemned last Sunday’s attack on journalists by state-run Al-Ahram security personnel on Wednesday. The journalists held a meeting with the chairman of Al-Ahram’s board of directors Mamdouh Al-Wali to discuss a solution surrounding the current newspaper crisis in Egypt last Saturday.

The ANHRI said the protesters were originally there to discuss how to deal with the problems that arose from the closure of newspapers and the loss in salaries, as well as the promised allowances by the Press Syndicate for those who had lost their jobs and relocation of employment to other state-run newspapers. Al-Wali previously agreed to several of their demands but had continuously stalled on signing an agreement. As a result, those attending the meetings called for a sit-in to pressure him.

According to the ANHRI, Al-Wali informed the Bulaq Abul Ela police station of the sit-in, and added that the protesters had attempted to storm his office. Al-Ahram security personnel reportedly threatened to use force on the protesters and at one point they were beaten after security guards turned off the lights. The police, the ANHRI said, did not respond to the protesters’ calls for help and the protesters were subsequently removed by force.

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/13/anhri-condemns-attack-on-journalists/

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