Égypt-actus
Follow
Find tag "liberté d'expression"
365.2K views | +18 today
Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
Curated by Egypt-actus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Trois ans après, les blogueurs arabes toujours sous pression

Trois ans après, les blogueurs arabes toujours sous pression | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Trois ans après les révolutions, les blogueurs et cyber-activistes du monde arabe se heurtent encore aux pressions des gouvernements.

En Egypte comme en Tunisie, l’idéal de liberté d’expression qu’il ont porté en 2011 est loin d’être atteint : surveillance massive, campagnes de dénigrement, menaces, tentatives de corruption et arrestations arbitraires.

« On a vécu quelques mois de liberté d’expression dans une période d’euphorie révolutionnaire, mais depuis, il y a eu une régression et un contournement des objectifs de la révolution », affirme Lina Ben Mhenni. Blogueuse tunisienne depuis 2008, elle fait partie de ces personnalités influentes qui ont participé au soulèvement contre le régime de Ben Ali en 2011. Depuis, Lina continue de critiquer les gouvernements qui se succèdent et d’aborder des sujets sensibles sur son blog « A Tunisian Girl » : religion, égalité homme-femme ou droits de l’homme.

Cette activité lui vaut de se retrouver sur les listes noires du groupe islamiste Ansar al-Charia et d'attirer la surveillance du gouvernement. « Avant, il y avait la censure mais je connaissais mon ennemi, c’était le régime, explique Lina. Aujourd’hui, je ne le connais plus vraiment car il y en a plusieurs : le gouvernement et les extrémistes religieux ».

Surveillance de masse

Témoins de l’influence et de la capacité de mobilisation des blogueurs lors des soulèvements de 2011, les nouveaux régimes surveillent de près ce qui se passe sur la Toile. Malgré la dénonciation d’attaques « sans précédent » du pouvoir, par 70 blogueurs arabes réunis à Amman (Jordanie) il y a deux semaines, la blogosphère a réaffirmé, le 11 février, ses craintes en participant à une campagne dénonçant la surveillance massive en ligne.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Il y a un seul côté de l'histoire en Egypte : la ligne gouvernementale

Il y a un seul côté de l'histoire en Egypte : la ligne gouvernementale | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The case of the Al Jazeera journalists sends a chilling message to journalists that there is a high price to pay for giving the Muslim Brotherhood a voice. A journalist working for a private pro-government Arabic daily sarcastly told Index that there is only one side to the story in Egypt: the government line. Mosa’ab El Shamy, a photojournalist whose brother is one of the defendants in the Al Jazeera case posted an article this week on the website Buzzfeed, humorously titled: If you want to get arrested in Egypt, work as a journalist.

In truth though, the case is no laughing matter. National Public Radio’s Cairo Correspondent Leila Fadel said it shows just how far Egypt has backslid on the goals of the January 2011 uprising when pro-democracy protesters had demanded greater freedom of expression. Today, violations against press freedoms in Egypt are the worst in decades, according to the New York-based Committee for the Protection of Journalists. Sadly, it does not look like the situation for journalists in Egypt will improve anytime soon.

In the meantime the fate of the Al Jazeera journalists hangs in the balance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Meet the ‘Muslim Anarchist’ Whose Cartoons Are Driving Fundamentalists in Egypt Crazy

Meet the ‘Muslim Anarchist’ Whose Cartoons Are Driving Fundamentalists in Egypt Crazy | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

(...) Cartoonist Dooa Eladl is 34-year-old Egyptian woman who calls herself a Muslim anarchist.  Her work appears in the prominent newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm—Egyptians Today. She has become one of Egypt’s best-known political cartoonists, in a field completely dominated by men. (One of her humorous drawings is a portrait of herself marching to work, her hair tied to the mustaches of four of her male colleagues.)

 

During the Egyptian uprising, Eladl and her colleagues supported the revolution by printing up some of their fiercest political satire, the kind that would not have been published, and handing them out in Tahrir Square. “I don’t think artists like myself should be members of political parties or organizers, but we should certainly use our art to speak out against injustice and oppression.”

 

Eladl’s blistering caricatures have landed her in hot water with some of Egypt’s powerful fundamentalists. She now has the distinction of being the first cartoonist in Egypt to face blasphemy charges. In 2012 Salafi lawyer Khaled El-Masry, Secretary General of a group called National Center for Defense of Freedoms, filed a complaint against her for defaming religious prophets. The cartoon he objected to shows an Egyptian man with angel wings lecturing Adam and Eve. The man is telling Adam and Eve that they would never have been expelled from heaven if they had simply voted in favor of the Brotherhood’s draft constitution in the recent Egyptian referendum. The court has not yet heard the case.

 

More on:http://www.disinfo.com/2013/04/meet-the-muslim-anarchist-whose-cartoons-are-driving-fundamentalists-in-egypt-crazy/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Is Egypt living in a time of unprecedented freedom?

There is a big difference between freedom of expression and defying authority. The latter is what’s happening in Egypt and we’re paying for it in blood.

 

I recently spoke at the World Summit on Information Systems + 10 (WSIS+10) in Paris. My kind invitation from UNESCO was to speak on a panel on 'Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Development in the Arab States', and naturally most of my remarks were focused on Egypt. Among (...)
 

When the floor was open for discussion, an enthusiastic young man in the front row, whose body language was clearly protesting my remarks all along, raised his hand emphatically asking to speak. He identified himself as a member of the Egypt delegation to UNESCO, and informed the moderator that in order for the session to be interactive, he would not stick to the request to keep comments from the floor “brief.”

He started his “talk” by expressing his gratitude for the opportunity to criticise his own government in such an “informal” setting, and proceeded to give a full account of how we in Egypt now live in times of “unprecedented freedom” under President Mohamed Morsi.

His explanation for this was that there is an unprecedented amount of criticism of the Egyptian president, the government, and the whole regime on television, in newspapers, and in the social media. He went on to blame the Egyptian media for the distorted picture in people’s minds about what is going on in the country, and wished that one day our Egyptian media would be as professional as Fox News. (I think this was when he completely lost the audience).

 

I could not let the gentleman’s remarks go by unanswered. What is happening in Egypt is not unprecedented freedom of expression. As a matter of fact, I believe we are at a time of unprecedented lack of freedom of expression. What is happening in Egypt is that people everywhere and at every level are defying authority. People refuse to be silenced anymore. They have spoken, and they will not shut up no matter what the price is.

 

More on: http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContentP/4/67754/Opinion/Is-Egypt-living-in-a-time-of-unprecedented-freedom.aspx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egyptians fear decay of press freedoms under Morsi

Egyptians fear decay of press freedoms under Morsi | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Each morning before the sun rises, newspapers are delivered across the country, often with blazing criticisms of the Egyptian government and President Mohammed Morsi.

 

On the newsstands, the competing editions are examples of the free speech and media freedoms that were among the principal gains of the nation's 2-year-old revolt that toppled dictator Hosni Mubarak.

But Mubarak-era laws still on the books and government encroachment on freedom of expression is clashing with a government that is embracing some democratic ideals and not others.

"This is an example of the struggle between the old Egypt and the new Egypt," said Sherif Mansour, Middle East and North Africa coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists.

 

Many Egyptians have enthusiastically seized on the new freedom to say and write what they believe about the government since Mubarak's ouster. But since Morsi was elected president last year, there have been tangible deterioration in press freedoms.

 

Among them are several criminal prosecutions against journalists made possible by the laws of Mubarak's era.(...)

"It's getting worse day after day," said Nihad Aboud, freedom of media and artistic creation programs coordinator at the Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression, in Egypt.

 

Repressive laws also extend to insults on religion and over the past several months there has been an increase in the number of blasphemy prosecutions

(....)

 

"Egypt is heading toward a real breakdown," said Liliane Daoud, a broadcast journalist with the privately owned ONTV.

 

Daoud believes the fight for free speech could have long-term positive consequences. The more the general public becomes aware of issues related to freer speech and media, the more they will demand it, she said.

 

More on: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/usatoday/article/1963237

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt TV host faces investigation over insulting president

Egypt TV host faces investigation over insulting president | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s public prosecutor ordered on Monday an investigation in a lawsuit that was filed against television host Bassem Youssef accusing him of insulting President Mohamed Mursi. 

Twelve citizens had come forward to the attorney general with an appeal to summon Bassem Youssef who hosts an evening political satire show on Friday.

The legal challenge mentioned that Youssef mocked an interview by the president, comparing it to the Oscars and granting it awards, including "best editing" and "best film".

Plaintiffs said in their appeal that they were offended by the insulting of the president of the country who is considered a symbol for the nation's prestige. 

Prosecution has decided to summon the plaintiffs to hear their appeal and contact the CBC satellite channel for a copy of the episode that was aired last Friday. 

 

This is the second time for the liberal TV host to face allegations of that kind.

 

This text is from Aswat Masreya

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

TV host sent to criminal court for insulting police syndicate

TV host sent to criminal court for insulting police syndicate | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s general prosecutor’s office referred on Sunday popular television host Tawfeek Okasha to criminal court for insulting the police syndicate. 

 

The prosecution's spokesman said that the attorney general has ordered the referral of Okasha to criminal court in response to a legal complaint filed by the police syndicate for its defamation on his television program. 

A number of police officers, who are members of the syndicate that is under construction, had come forward with a legal challenge against the TV host for insulting the police officers and their wives on an episode that aired on the satellite channel that he owns.
 

A court had sentenced Okasha to four months in prison in October for insulting Islamist President Mohamed Mursi. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

1 - Liberté, menaces et autocensure: les défis de la presse en Egypte

1 - Liberté, menaces et autocensure: les défis de la presse en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

L’Atelier des médias a rencontré une journaliste et un spécialiste des médias en Egypte pour dresser un état des lieux de la presse deux ans après la chute de Hosni Moubarak. Les sujets d'inquiétudes restent nombreux même si certains acquis sont indiscutables.

 

Il y a deux ans, la rue égyptienne venait à bout, en quelques jours, d'une des dictatures les plus anciennes et les plus corrompues du monde arabe. Un vent de liberté et d'espoir soufflait sur le Caire, Alexandrie, Port Said et l'ensemble du pays. Un vent d'espoir immédiatement tempéré par les réalités du terrain, le pouvoir des militaires, les violences intercommunautaires, la monté des partis religieux.

 

Deux ans après, l'incertitude et les inquiétudes demeurent. L'exécutif, et particulièrement le Président frère musulman Mohamed Morsi, a montré des tentations de pouvoir sans partage. Les violences et comportements dégradants de la police continuent et sont dénoncés grâce à des vidéos amateurs.


Les affrontement récents d'une violence inouïe à Port Said ont même poussé certains spécialistes à s'interroger un moment sur l'éventualité d'une guerre civile.

 

Du point de vue des libertés, le tableau est également plein d'interrogations. Il y a quelques jours un juge a décidé d'interdire l'accès à Youtube, le site de partage vidéo, pendant un mois pour avoir diffusé le film Innocence of muslims. Une décision contestée, probablement inapplicable, mais inquiétante tout de même. L'Egypte de Moubarak n'était pas l'état le plus fermé du monde arabe en termes de liberté d'expression. Il y avait une presse dynamique, des espaces d'expression libre mais aussi un certain nombre de lignes rouges infranchissables : le président, sa famille, les forces de l'ordre, la corruption des puissants etc. A-t-on évolué de ce point de vue? Y a-t-il encore des tabous? De nouvelles lignes rouges?

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

Cette semaine, l'Atelier était au Caire, en Egypte pour une émission spéciale. Nous profitons de l'organisation du Forum 4M par Canal France International (CFI). Les forums 4M réunissent depuis deux ans des acteurs des médias pour s'interroger sur le journalisme face aux enjeux numériques. 4 M pour média, Méditerranée mutations et Montpellier la ville où est née cette conférence nomade.

 

Plus: http://www.rfi.fr/emission/20130223-1-egypte-2-ans-apres-revolution

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

The Belly Dancing Barometer

The Belly Dancing Barometer | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Daily News of Egypt reported that the national administrative court ruled last week that the popular Al-Tet “belly dancing channel” be taken off the air for broadcasting without a license. Who knew that Egypt had a belly dancing channel? (Does Comcast know about this?) It is evidently quite popular but apparently offensive to some of the rising Islamist forces in Egypt. It is not clear how much the Muslim Brotherhood’s party had to do with the belly ban, but what is clear is that no one in Egypt is having much fun these days.

 

The country is more divided than ever between Islamist and less religious and liberal parties, and the Egyptian currency has lost 8 percent of its value against the dollar in the last two months. Even more disturbing, there has been a sharp increase lately in cases of police brutality and rape directed at opposition protesters. It is all adding up to the first impression that President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood are blowing their first chance at power.

 

Sometime in the next few months, Morsi is to visit the White House. He has only one chance to make a second impression if he wants to continue to receive U.S. aid from Congress. But the more I see of Muslim Brotherhood rule in Egypt, the more I wonder if it has any second impression to offer.(...)

 

In order to get Egyptians to sign on to that pain, a big majority needs to feel invested in the government and its success. And that is not the case today. Morsi desperately needs a national unity government, made up of a broad cross-section of Egyptian parties, but, so far, the Muslim Brotherhood has failed to reach any understanding with the National Salvation Front, the opposition coalition. (...)

 

Bottom line: Either the Muslim Brotherhood changes or it fails — and the sooner it realizes that the better. I understand why President Obama’s team prefers to convey this message privately: so the political forces in Egypt don’t start focusing on us instead of on each other.

 

More on: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/20/opinion/friedman-the-belly-dancing-barometer.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Morsi s’oriente vers le tout contrôle en Egypte

Morsi s’oriente vers le tout contrôle en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Pendant de nombreuses années et en vertu de la loi, le régime de Moubarak n’a cessé de violer les droits de l’homme. La création des partis était criminalisée, les manifestations, les grèves, les rassemblements comme presque toute critique du régime aussi. Cet arsenal juridique, soutenu par un état d’urgence permanent confisquant les droits, n’a pourtant pas empêché les Egyptiens d’exercer leurs droits en violation de la loi et n’a pas non plus entravé la chute de Moubarak.

 

Quelques mois avant l’arrivée du président Morsi, l’état d’urgence prolongé par les militaires qui assuraient l’intérim a été abrogé. Mais les mois qui ont suivi l’installation de Morsi à la tête du pays ont été marqués par un ensemble de lois ou projets de loi qui reprennent dans le fond l’arsenal législatif utilisé par l’ancien régime pour « légaliser la répression et restreindre les libertés », selon l’opposition et les ONG.

Des lois sont passées, d’autres sont en cours de préparation. L’un des projets de loi les plus dangereux est intitulé « Protéger la société contre les personnes dangereuses » et il reprend une ancienne loi de l’époque royale des années 1940 dite « loi soupçon », car elle criminalise les suspects avant de commettre le crime et entreprend comme mesures préventives leur placement sous surveillance policière ou l’interdiction de leur présence dans des lieux spécifiques, ou leur détention sans accusation précise ou verdict de justice. « Cette loi a été jugée inconstitutionnelle car elle ouvre la voie à l’arbitraire dans son application et à des abus sur les libertés individuelles », explique Hafez Abou-Seada, directeur de l’Organisation égyptienne des droits de l’homme.

Mais il semble que le ministère de l’Intérieur veut la faire passer, si l’on en croit les discussions à la Chambre haute du Parlement, qui détient temporairement le pouvoir législatif. Le Sénat examine déjà ces jours-ci une loi qui « réglemente » les manifestations. Approuvée par le gouvernement, elle a pour objectif d’ « assurer la nature pacifique des manifestations » et de « protéger le droit » de manifester, se défend le ministre de la Justice, Ahmad Mekki. (Samar Al-Gamal/Al-Ahram Hebdo)

 

Plus : http://hebdo.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/962/10/124/1749/Politique-Morsi-s%E2%80%99oriente-vers-le-tout-contr%C3%B4le-en.aspx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt Struggles to Define 'Free Speech' (& video)

Egypt Struggles to Define 'Free Speech' (& video) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

From online activism to protests in the street, Egyptians have exercised their right to free speech over the past two years in ways unimaginable even in the recent past.

But novelist Alaa el-Aswany believes that sense of freedom is illusory, with the government of President Mohamed Morsi pursuing its own agenda.

"The formula is the following: you write whatever you want, I'm going to do whatever I want," says el-Aswany.

He believes the current leadership has cracked down even more than ex-president Hosni Mubarak.

"Mr. Morsi brought about 10 writers to the court who were accused of insulting the president. He did that in like four months, six months," el-Aswany says. "Mubarak, in 30 years, he did that three times."

It's not just insults to political leaders that prompt a reaction. A U.S.-made video impugning Islam's Prophet Muhammad set off an attack on the American Embassy and brought death sentences, in absentia, for the Egyptians who made it.

An Islamist view of free speech can differ dramatically from the concept embraced in the West.

 

Safwat al-Ghani, of Gama'a Islamiya, says there is a different understanding of freedom. He favors freedom which is controlled by “respect for sacredness and the conventions of Islam.”

 

That view has wide support in this deeply religious country. But for many, protection for political figures is another matter.

Political satirist Bassem al-Youssef is one of Egypt's most popular comedians, but prosecutors don't find his mocking of the president so amusing.

More on: http://www.voanews.com/content/egypt-free-speech/1606470.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Author summoned by prosecution over Al-Azhar complaint

Author summoned by prosecution over Al-Azhar complaint | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Supreme State Security Prosecution has summoned author Youssef Zeydan for interrogation over a complaint by Al-Azhar's Islamic Research Academy, the details of which remain unknown.

Zyedan said the he is summoned Tuesday to the prosecution's office in Cairo's Fifth Settlement, and that he had been informed that the summons is related to his book, “The Arab Theology.”

Complaints related to the insult of religion against actors, authors and media figures have been on the rise, coinciding with the mounting political influence of Islamist forces since the January 2011 uprising.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Le gouvernement égyptien veut contrôler les manifestations

Le gouvernement égyptien veut contrôler les manifestations | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le gouvernement égyptien a approuvé mercredi un projet de loi visant à réguler l’organisation des manifestations, considéré par des associations de droits de l’Homme comme une atteinte à la liberté d’expression. 
La loi doit encore être votée par le sénat, qui détient le pouvoir législatif jusqu’à la tenue d’élections législatives dans les prochains mois. 
Elle a pour objectif d’»assurer la nature pacifique des manifestations» et «protéger le droit» à manifester, a affirmé le ministre de la Justice, Ahmed Mekki, lors d’une conférence de presse. 
Le projet de loi doit aussi «empêcher la confusion entre les manifestations pacifiques, que l’Etat souhaite protéger, et les attaques visant les individus et les propriétés ainsi que les troubles à l’ordre public», a-t-il précisé. 
Le texte stipule que les organisateurs doivent informer à l’avance les autorités de leur projet de manifestation et que le ministère de l’Intérieur a le droit de refuser aux organisateurs le droit de manifester. (Libération/ma)


Plus : http://www.libe.ma/Le-gouvernement-egyptien-veut-controler-les-manifestations_a35190.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

En Egypte, la liberté de la presse se détériore de façon alarmante

En Egypte, la liberté de la presse se détériore de façon alarmante | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le constat émane du récent rapport du comité de protection des journalistes. Arrestation, détention, censure, intimidation. Le régime déploie une énergie considérable pour faire taire la presse, qui souhaite donner la parole à toutes les parties.

La situation devient inquiétante, notamment depuis l’incarcération il y a un mois et demi de l’équipe d’Al Jazeera en langue anglaise.

En Egypte, les journalistes sont désormais des cibles pour les autorités.

 

Ecouter : http://www.franceculture.fr/player/reecouter?play=4794420

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

La "spirale descendante" de la liberté des médias en Egypte

La "spirale descendante" de la liberté des médias en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The terms “banned” and “terrorist” are once again affixed to mention of the Muslim Brotherhood in nearly all Egyptian media. State and private media alike tout themilitary-backed government’s lines. Newspapers and talk shows on TV, Egypt’s most popular medium, extol the military for reclaiming the revolution and sinisterly warn against traitors who dissent. All news and opposing views are vilified as pro-Brotherhood—and therefore dangerous. 

It is no surprise that Egyptian media largely heralded the military’s assent and stayed silent as it cracked down on the Brotherhood and opposition voices: for decades, a toxic mix of political and economic interests have stifled the development of, and respect for, the mechanisms for independent and transparent media. Now, as Egypt passes the three-year mark since Hosni Mubarak’s ouster in 2011, many are bracing for how far this latest crackdown on media freedoms can go. 

 “We are in a downward spiral,” American University of Cairo Mass Communications Professor Rasha Abdulla said by phone from Cairo. “We are back to where we were under the Mubarak era, but now with the support of the masses.”   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Arabic Network For Human Rights Information denounces the persistent using of security solutions against the right of the students to expression

Arabic Network For Human Rights Information denounces the persistent using of security solutions against the right of the students to expression | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI), denounces dispersing a peaceful demonstration organized by the students of the Miser International University (MIU) by the security forces and MIU guards. The students organized the demonstration in front of MIU’s administration building on the Cairo-Ismailia desert road. The aim of the demonstration is solidarity with their colleague who was punished on the background of participating in a peaceful demonstration that demanded from the administration of MIU to build a pedestrian bridge. The security forces used tear gas bombs and Cartouche which led several injuries among the students.

As one of the students suffered from a road accident during passing the road in his way to the university, which led a group of students to organize a demonstration in front of the MIU’s President Office. They demanded from him to build a pedestrian bridge in front of MIU to keep the students safe. The administration sought the assistance of the ministry of interior to disperse the protest last Tuesday. Therefore, the central security forces assaulted the protesters and dispersed their protest by force.

ANHRI said that “the Egyptian State still support the security solutions to address the fair demands of the citizens and limits its security arm, represented in the ministry of interior, on protecting the authority and the businessmen. The Egyptian State keep the forces to address all the forms of peaceful expression instead of play their role of protecting the citizens”.

 

More : http://www.anhri.net/en/?p=11992

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Égypte: un atelier TAIEX sur la liberté d’accès à l’information

Égypte: un atelier TAIEX sur la liberté d’accès à l’information | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Le ministère égyptien de la justice a organisé, avec le soutien de TAIEX (Technical Assistance and Information Exchange instrument), un atelier international sur le projet de loi relatif à la liberté de l’information. Le texte de loi que rédigent actuellement les services du ministère prévoit la création d’un « Conseil national de l’information » chargé de garantir aux citoyens l’accès aux informations et aux données recueillies par l’État et ses instances. Cet atelier avait pour objectif de communiquer aux acteurs égyptiens les diverses remarques et le feedback d’experts d’États membres de l’UE (Royaume-Uni, Suède, Roumanie et Estonie). La Banque mondiale a également participé à l’événement, ce qui a permis aux législateurs égyptiens de profiter de l’expertise indienne et mexicaine. Une séance à huis-clos a par ailleurs réuni les experts et de hauts responsables égyptiens chargés de finaliser le projet de loi, permettant aux experts de proposer des pistes pour garantir que le texte de loi respecte bien les normes internationales. Une fois le texte adopté, l’Égypte deviendra le 94e pays à mettre en place un tel mécanisme de divulgation.  (enpi.info.eu)
Plus : http://enpi-info.eu/medportal/news/latest/32404/%C3%89gypte:-un-atelier-TAIEX-sur-la-libert%C3%A9-d%E2%80%99acc%C3%A8s-%C3%A0-l%E2%80%99information
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Le bureau d'un journal a été attaqué en Égypte

Le bureau d'un journal a été attaqué en Égypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

En Egypte, plus de 40 personnes ont attaqué le bureau du journal indépendant Al-Watan, a rapporté le site du journal ce samedi, sans préciser le nom de la ville où cette attaque a eu lieu.

Le journal connu pour ses critiques du mouvement islamique au pouvoir, les Frères musulmans, a récemment publié un article sur les supporters du club anti-gouvernemental du Caire Al Ahli et aurait pris contact avec l'un des hauts responsables dans le gouvernement. Mais le journal a dû par la suite se rétracter et publier un démenti.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Arab Spring Blues?

Arab Spring Blues? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Arab revolutions are going through a rough patch, from political uncertainty in North Africa to daily massacres in Syria. Egypt appears, at times, on the brink of either economic collapse or a military coup. Tunisia is still reeling from a political assassination and may face prolonged instability (...) Many ordinary citizens in both countries are depressed and disoriented.

But at least they haven’t lost their sense of humor.

 

The latest meme to take over both Egyptian [and Tunisian] social media involves filming a silly dance to the Harlem Shake, an electronic tune by the American D.J. Baauer, and uploading the result to YouTube. (...) it has spread to the Middle East, with a twist: It is getting people arrested or in trouble, turning it into a new genre of political protest.

 

Last week, Egyptians began to threaten to perform the Harlem Shake in front of the headquarters of the governing Muslim Brotherhood. This prompted the group’s spokesman to warn that the dance could turn to violence (the building was targeted by rioters during protests in December).

In a separate incident, Egyptian police promptly moved to arrest four men who performed the dance in their underwear in the streets of Cairo. The number might now become a symbol of defiance, already a popular pastime in a country rocked by nonstop protests since late November and with a growing wave of civil disobedience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Égypte. Des restrictions encore plus sévères pour les ONG

Égypte. Des restrictions encore plus sévères pour les ONG | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Une décision récente des autorités égyptiennes soumet tout contact entre les ONG nationales et des organisations étrangères à l'approbation préalable d'organismes de sécurité. Cette mesure accentue encore l'hostilité du régime envers la liberté d'association, a déclaré Amnesty International. 

Dans une lettre à l'Organisation égyptienne des droits humains, le ministère égyptien des Assurances et des Affaires sociales a déclaré qu'aucune « entité locale » n'était autorisée à entrer en relation avec des « entités internationales » sans avoir d'abord obtenu l'aval des « organismes chargés de la sécurité ». Cette déclaration s'appuyait sur des instructions du Premier ministre. 

Amnesty International a pu obtenir copie de cette lettre. L'expression « entités internationales » est suffisamment vague pour pouvoir désigner à la fois des organisations internationales de défense des droits humains et des organismes des Nations unies. 

« Les ONG présentes en Égypte sont déjà confrontées à des restrictions exorbitantes, mais cette nouvelle décision aggrave encore la situation, a déclaré Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, directrice adjointe d'Amnesty International pour le Moyen-Orient et l'Afrique du Nord. Nous sommes en présence d'une décision qui annonce probablement d'autres mesures hostiles aux groupes de défense des droits humains dans la loi que prépare le gouvernement. » 

Au nom de la législation en vigueur, les ONG se voient opposer de nombreux obstacles, notamment des restrictions à leur enregistrement officiel et à l'obtention de fonds provenant de l'étranger. Des projets de lois nouvelles ont pu être examinés par Amnesty International. Ils accentuent encore les restrictions existantes et, dans certains cas, limitent considérablement la capacité des ONG à mettre sur pied des visites et d'autres activités destinées à recueillir faits et témoignages ainsi que leur droit de recevoir des fonds pour financer leurs activités. 

« Nous craignons que les autorités soient sur le point de faire adopter une législation dont le but serait de faire taire la société civile afin d'empêcher l'expression de toute critique », a déclaré Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui. 

Depuis la « Révolution du 25 janvier 2011 », les autorités égyptiennes n'ont eu de cesse de réprimer les organisations internationales et les groupes de défense des droits humains. 

En juillet 2011, le gouvernement égyptien a ouvert une enquête sur le financement des ONG par des pays étrangers. Celle-ci a débouché en décembre 2011 sur une série sans précédent de descentes policières visant des groupes internationaux ou de la société civile égyptienne. 

Cette répression s'était traduite par la mise en accusation de 43 membres du personnel d'associations internationales, soupçonnés d'avoir exercé leur activité sans autorisation officielle et d'avoir obtenu des fonds provenant de l'étranger sans l'approbation des autorités égyptiennes. Amnesty International avait aussitôt demandé l'abandon des poursuites. 

« Les autorités doivent cesser de présenter les organisations indépendantes de la société civile comme des boucs émissaires responsables de toutes les plaies de l'Égypte », a déclaré Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui. « L'interdiction de contacts avec des "entités" internationales renvoie à des pratiques qui avaient cours sous Moubarak et que le président actuel avait promis de bannir. » 

« Nous demandons aux autorités égyptiennes de faire en sorte que la loi qui remplacera celle qui s'applique aujourd'hui aux ONG respecte le droit international, notamment la liberté d'expression et d'association. Elle doit en outre faire appel à la consultation transparente des organisations de défense des droits humains et autres ONG. » 

Le gouvernement égyptien a dû récemment faire face à l'expression de critiques relatives à un nouveau projet de loi limitant la liberté de réunion, entre autres projets législatifs de nature restrictive. 

L'année dernière, l'Organisation égyptienne des droits humains s'était vue interdire par le gouvernement la possibilité de mettre en chantier un projet portant sur la liberté d'association. (communiqué de presse)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt Crowdsources Censorship

Egypt Crowdsources Censorship | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Egyptian government is now crowdsourcing censorship efforts. A new web page created by the country's National Telecommunications Registry Agency, allows citizens to report blasphemous websites (Arabic-language links).

According to Alix Dunn of tech activism blog The Engine Room, the site is designed to help find pages showing a controversial anti-Islam film. The film, a low-budget American effort called The Innocence of Muslims, portrays Mohammed in extremely negative ways and sparked violent riots worldwide.

Visitors to the National Telecommunications Registry page are instructed to leave the offending URL on a page with a CAPTCHA link; government bureaucrats then review the page and block it if it leads to blasphemous content. This service follows on the heels of a failed attempt to ban YouTube in Egypt because of numerous uploaded copies of The Innocence of Muslims.

 

More on: http://www.fastcompany.com/3006149/fast-feed/egypt-crowdsources-censorship

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

EOHR worried about freedom of expression

EOHR worried about freedom of expression | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Egyptian Organisation for Human Rights (EOHR) expressed concerns on Wednesday regarding freedom of expression in Egypt.

The EOHR said in a statement that the proliferation of contempt of religion lawsuits threatens free speech. It added that the legislations governing freedom of thought and expression should be amended to fit international conventions and treaties ratified by Egypt.

Author and novelist Youssef Ziedan was referred to investigations by the Supreme State Security Prosecution on Tuesday. Zeidan was accused of contempt of religion.

“Freedom of thought and expression is a right recognised by international conventions and treaties governing human rights,” said Hafez Abu Saada, secretary general of EOHR. “Yet the current domestic laws only aim at controlling media outlets.” He added that cases such as contempt of religion shouldn’t be addressed in court yet through objective dialogue and discussions. (Daily news Egypt)

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/20/eohr-worried-about-freedom-of-expression/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+DailyNewsEgypt+%28Daily+News+Egypt%29

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Égypte: le HCDH préoccupé par un projet de loi qui restreint le droit de rassemblement

Égypte: le HCDH préoccupé par un projet de loi qui restreint le droit de rassemblement | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l'homme (HCDH) a exprimé mardi sa préoccupation devant le projet de loi approuvé la semaine dernière par le cabinet égyptien et qui restreint considérablement la liberté de rassemblement.

« Nous regrettons que le projet de loi sur les manifestations approuvé le 13 février dernier ne prenne pas suffisamment en compte les observations du HCDH et d'autres organisations des droits de l'homme », a indiqué Rupert Colville, porte-parole du Haut Commissariat, lors d'un point de presse donné à Genève.

M. Colville a reconnu que la liberté de rassemblement, considérée comme l'une des pierres angulaires de la démocratie, peut être sujette à certaines restrictions. Cependant, « elle devrait aussi être considérée comme la règle, et les restrictions comme l'exception. Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi soulève des préoccupations quant à la nature et à la portée des limites imposées », a-t-il noté.

Le texte prévoit notamment des sanctions pénales contre les organisateurs qui ne respecteraient pas le cadre juridique désormais fixé pour l'organisation d'une manifestation. Il impose également de larges restrictions aux rassemblements publics et limite le choix des lieux où ils peuvent se dérouler, tout en accordant aux Ministère de l'Intérieur toute discrétion pour annuler les rassemblements.

« Personne ne devrait être pénalisé ou exposé à des menaces d'actes de violence, de harcèlement ou de persécution pour avoir exprimé de manière pacifique des préoccupations quant aux questions relatives aux droits de l'homme», a rappelé M. Colville.

« Nous recommandons donc que les dispositions du projet de loi soient réexaminées, de manière à s'assurer qu'il respecte les normes internationales des droits de l'homme. »

Des dizaines de milliers d'Égyptiens ont pris part le mois dernier à des manifestations contre le Président Mohammed Morsi, deux ans après les soulèvements populaires qui avaient provoqué la chute de l'ancien Président Hosni Moubarak et ouvert une période de transition dans le pays. Des dizaines de personnes ont trouvé la mort lors des récentes manifestations, qui ont également fait plus d'un millier de blessés.

Devant ces incidents, le Secrétaire général Ban Ki-moon et la Haute Commissaire aux droits de l'homme Navi Pillay ont appelé les Égyptiens à restés engagés en faveur d'un dialogue pacifique et de la non-violence alors que se poursuit la transition démocratique.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Protest law will infringe on human rights

Protest law will infringe on human rights | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A protest bill proposed by the government threatens the right to demonstrate in addition to encouraging police brutality, human rights organisations have said.

The drafted protest bill was sent to the Shura Council to be reviewed. The bill, drafted by the Ministry of Justice, will then be voted upon by members in the upper house of parliament and, if passed, will be signed into law by President Mohamed Morsi.

The proposed bill stirred controversy among activists and human rights organisations who argue it infringes upon freedoms of expression and movement, the right to protest, the right to strike, and sanctions the use violence by security forces against protesters.

“This law infringes upon the right to protest and freedom of movement,” said Ahmed Ezzat, who heads the legal unit of the Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression. (Daily news Egypt)

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/18/protest-law-will-infringe-on-human-rights/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

"A final goodbye to Ahram", by Hani Shukrallah

"A final goodbye to Ahram", by Hani Shukrallah | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

"The deed is done: the MB has now fulfilled its resolve to drive me out of Ahram. It began with cutting my salary in half (the first act of the then new MB chairman); I hung one. Then came my forcible retirement (3 years too early in the case of a chief editor, which I had been); I hung on, pushing for Ahram Online managing editor, the wonderful Fouad Mansour, to take my place (telling my staff that I'd be Vito Corleone -after he was shot- to Fouad's Michael). Then they moved on the remaining half of my salary, cutting that by two thirds (whereby I was now getting paid less than the most junior of my staff) - and one and half month later, no decision to appoint Fouad as my successor. Just today I found out that in a meeting with a committee formed by Ahram Online staff to negotiate with the management, they were told that my status was "too complicated", and that (despite previous denials that it'd all been a bureaucratic mistake) the third of one half would remain in place, while my connection with Ahram Online would depend on the wishes of the new editor (who's yet to be named). The object of course is humiliation. Which simply shows how stupid they are. 
So now, I bid a final goodbye to Ahram. I do so with zero savings, own nothing, and will have to sell my car (to pay back Ahram what I owe on it). But fools! I have something immeasurably more precious: my dignity and self-respect. What do you have?"

https://www.facebook.com/hani.shukrallah.1/posts/606150136077502

more...
No comment yet.