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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Mursi Leaves Unrest Behind in Visit to Pakistan and India

Mursi Leaves Unrest Behind in Visit to Pakistan and India | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

(....) Speaking to reporters after his meeting with the Indian PM, Mursi said that he wanted Egypt to be the “hub of Indian exports to Africa.”  His Indian counterpart said that “the agreements that we have signed today are a clear manifestation of our desire to impart a new dynamism to our relationship.”

Before embarking on his south Asia tour, President Mursi left Cairo amid tempestuous circumstances. The office of the Muslim Brotherhood’s guidance bureau, located in the Mokattam district of southern Cairo, has recently been the scene of two days of violent clashes. Security sources revealed that the violence, which broke out between security forces and demonstrators opposed to the Brotherhood’s rule three days ago, came to an end Sunday after dozens had been injured, some of them seriously.

 

Now, Mokattam district is experiencing a state of uneasy calm. Intensive security reinforcements have been deployed to guard the Brotherhood’s bureau, while plain clothed security personnel are patrolling the district.

 

http://www.aawsat.net/2013/03/article55296206

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Egypt’s descent into lawlessness a bitter own goal

Egypt’s descent into lawlessness a bitter own goal | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Protest has become a way of life for many Egyptians all over the country. Everyone seems to have a gripe; everyone is aware that something is rotten in the state of Egypt but there’s little consensus on how to put things right.

Scenes of angry demonstrators firing buildings and choking under clouds of teargas has become routine television watching, so much so that most café patrons simply glance at the screen and sigh before resuming their conversations or a game of dominoes.

On Friday, a court ruling confirming sentencing for those involved in a riot last year during a football match between Cairo’s Al Ahly and Port Said’s Masry club that robbed 74 fans (most Al Ahly supporters) of their lives pleased no one. (...) A large banner erected over the port’s [of Port-Said] entrance called for the city’s secession from Egypt, echoing an action taken by the city of Mahalla which declared its independence last year. Last week, the Interior Ministry withdrew its police forces from Port Said in the hope of calming tensions eliciting celebrations. Ostensibly, the army now has control of the city except the military is eschewing policing duties announcing it is only responsible for protecting state buildings and the canal. (...)

 

The general mood is one of helplessness and anxiety. It’s evident that a government overwhelmed by violent opposition and a security apparatus that’s breaking apart - over 30 police stations around the country are on strike - has lost direction and control, so much so that an increasing number of people are nostalgic for “the good old days” when Mubarak was at the helm. Placards asking Mubarak, who’s ailing and behind bars, for forgiveness are commonly seen.

 

Many more are calling upon the military to step-in and to prove their seriousness, are signing personal powers of attorney in the name of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces; ironic when just months ago, the thought of a military coup was anathema for almost everyone.  President Mohammad Mursi is in a quandary. An authoritarian approach only incites increased rage in a nation that suffered for over 30 years under a virtual dictatorship. On the other hand, a laissez-faire policy is bringing the country to its economic knees.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Instability has Egypt’s regional friends with fat pockets backing-off; investment has dried up along with tourism. (...) The government’s attempt to raise income, property and sales taxes in accordance with IMF conditions associated with a $4.8 billion loan is severely impacting the poor in a country where an estimated 50 million subsist below the poverty line. (...) Democracy isn’t doing too well either.(...)

 

A national unity government representing all sides of the political and religious spectrum and made up of veteran politicians and technocrats is the only sensible way forward. Mursi must admit that he can’t do it alone and reach out to the opposition. As Henry Ford is quoted as saying, “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently”.

 

More on: http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/international/13-Mar-2013/egypt-s-descent-into-lawlessness-a-bitter-own-goal

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Nouvelle crise politique en Egypte -

Nouvelle crise politique en Egypte - | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Depuis l’accession du frère musulman Mohamed Morsi au pouvoir en juin 2012, l’Egypte est constamment en ébullition. C’est la tension permanente entre le pouvoir et l’opposition, à tel point que l’on a l’impression que la révolution de début 2011 qui a fait partir Hosni Moubarak n’est toujours pas finie.

La violence, déjà endémique, a redoublé d’intensité le week-end avec la condamnation de supporters de Port Saïd. Affrontements avec la police, casses, incendies, perturbations de la navigation dans le canal de Suez, se sont emparés de Port Saïd qui, depuis un certain temps, est devenu une ville rebelle au pouvoir du Caire au point que ce dernier a été obligé d’y décréter momentanément l’état d’urgence et un couvre-feu. La violence agite tellement les eaux du Nil que la suspension par la justice des élections législatives programmées par le pouvoir pour le 22 avril prochain a été reléguée au second plan.

Pourtant, c’est un acte que l’on voit rarement sous nos tropiques où le pouvoir judiciaire, généralement assujetti à celui exécutif, n’ose pas le contredire. Malheureusement, cet acte, qui n’est pas le premier de la Justice égyptienne dont on ne peut douter de son indépendance, a été noyé et n’a pas été salué, commenté comme il se doit en ce qu’il est un exemple que beaucoup de pays africains doivent suivre. Le cycle de violences commence même par exaspérer la police qui a décidé d’aller en grève pour exiger du pouvoir des moyens adéquats pour faire le travail, et le limogeage du ministre de l’Intérieur.

Crise en Egypte Les agents qui ont marre de casser du manifestant à la Place Tahrir ou dans d’autres villes du pays, ne sont rien d’autre que ceux des brigades anti-émeutes. Le bras armé de l’Etat, qui ne manque pas d’humanisme, ne supporte visiblement plus de se comporter comme sous l’ère Moubarak bien qu’il n’en a pas perdu les réflexes de brutalité au regard des nombreuses morts enregistrées. Les policiers aussi ont tiré des leçons de la révolution du Nil vu que bon nombre de leurs chefs ont maille à partir avec la justice pour avoir ordonné la répression de manifestations demandant le départ du raïs du pouvoir. Personne ne veut être sacrifié sur l’autel des politiciens qui n’hésitent pas à jeter des policiers en pâture pour calmer la colère de la population suite à des bavures.

 

Plus: http://senegal-actu.com/2013/03/12/nouvelle-crise-politique-en-egypte-3638.html

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The Brotherhood’s Dilemma in Ruling Egypt

The Brotherhood’s Dilemma in Ruling Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It is not too early to say now, after the recent succession of unfortunate events, that President Mursi and the Muslim Brotherhood are facing a real dilemma. The elections have been postponed by order of the judiciary, while civil disobedience continues in Port Said, as private property and government offices are burned down. Clashes and skirmishes have also spread to other cities in the Delta—Mansoura and Mahalla—and more dangerous than all this, police factions have rebelled and begun to join the protests.

This worsening situation is exacerbated by the failed and fragmented Egyptian opposition, united only by their opposition to the president. A segment of this opposition is clearly dishonest; aiming to thwart the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood even if they ignite the whole country in doing so, supported by an intoxicated media force that delivers more painful blows to an already severely strained situation, laughing sardonically at the confusion of the president and his fragile government.

This is a real dilemma, because with regards to the security deterioration, the president is facing two bitter solutions: Firstly, he could adopt a strict and firm approach to security by using live ammunition against the thugs and vandals who are attacking public and private property, some of whom carry weapons.

This is the solution advocated by some supporters of the president and his Islamist allies, and this is also the demand of a significant portion of the people who are growing tired at the continuing unrest and protests that have contributed to the deterioration of the economic situation, the decline in currency, and rising prices.

This solution involves significant risk because using force will pour more fuel on the already burning fire, potentially accelerating the country’s downfall into a spiral of violence and counter attacks. If a security officer shot dead one thug on the street, would the deceased turn into a martyr or national hero? Would we hear people ask “what crime did he commit that he deserved to die?” And then, what if the death toll turned into the dozens and hundreds?

The second solution, and this is what has so far been adopted by the president and his advisory team, is as follows: To exercise the highest degree of restraint towards violence and attacks on private and public property, and not to use arms against the perpetrators of these offences. This solution, although it appears humane and wise, also has serious side effects. It means more insecurity, a decline in the prestige of the ruler, and the further deterioration of the economic situation.

If the people are not fed when they are hungry, and not protected when they are scared, then they will pay little attention to a ruler’s kindness, humanity, and humility, even if he lives in a modest rented apartment.

 

More on: http://www.aawsat.net/2013/03/article55295400

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L'Égypte et ses plaies, par Denis Daumin

L'Égypte et ses plaies, par Denis Daumin | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

L'Égypte encore. Aux douze plaies bibliques qui ont accablé cette immense contrée, s'ajoutent désormais le football, autre religion universelle, et l'inflammabilité des esprits chauffés à blanc.

Le drame de Port-Saïd voici un an et le verdict rendu hier au Caire ne sont évidemment que le support et les symptômes d'une crise qui dépasse les rivalités d'arènes sportives et le patriotisme du maillot. Après la Syrie à feu et à sang depuis deux ans, une nouvelle guerre civile sur les rives du Nil ?
Tout le laisse craindre et d'abord la quasi-paralysie d'un État aujourd'hui « au bord de l'effondrement » selon l'analyse d'un dignitaire d'une armée volontairement en retrait. Pierre angulaire d'un système renversé voici deux printemps, elle attend. Mais quoi ?
Au sommet de la pyramide, le pharaon du moment ne dit rien, ne bouge pas. Les quelques illusions qui avaient accompagné son élection se sont dissipées. 
L'américanophone, formé sur la côte Ouest, n'a jamais cessé d'être un fellah, disciple étriqué des Frères musulmans. Et sa silhouette dense ne lui a jamais donné la carrure d'un chef d'État.
Que retiendra-t-on de l'intérim Morsi ? Moins d'argent, plus de désordre et de sang. Et puis le sable et le vent effaceront son nom, laissant le sphinx parfaitement indifférent.

(La Nouvelle République)http://www.lanouvellerepublique.fr/Toute-zone/Actualite/24-Heures/n/Contenus/Articles/2013/03/10/L-Egypte-et-ses-plaies-1364800
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Francoise Autier's comment, March 10, 2013 12:37 AM
pourvu que l interim de Morsi prenne bientot fin !!!
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Al-Qaeda’s Syrian Revival, a Lesson for Egypt

Al-Qaeda’s Syrian Revival, a Lesson for Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

One of the worst consequences of the Western and Arab worlds’ reluctance to topple Bashar Al-Assad has been Syria’s transformation into fertile ground for extremism and parasitic terrorist groups. By this I certainly do not mean the many honorable, moderate fighters who wish to overthrow Bashar the Bloody, and in his place establish a political system that respects justice and the rights of the people. Rather I mean the opportunistic few that exploit the resistance, such as Al-Qaeda and its ilk, who act on their belief that there can be no change without violence.

Al-Qaeda has received some devastating blows ever since its true cards became exposed. For despite its earlier claims that it was combating Zionist and American influence, (...) its appeal has plummeted and its propaganda has fallen on deaf ears. The Arab Spring hastened its decline, with the peoples of Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen proving that the path to change need not pass through the gates of violence and arms. (...)

 

It may be too early to start drawing lessons from the Syrian revolution, but one thing is certain: The liberals, knowingly or unknowingly, fan Al-Qaeda’s fires whenever they fiercely oppose moderate Islamists, as is clearly the case currently in Egypt. The chaos caused by the violent clashes in Syria is what has allowed Al-Qaeda to thrive once again, fueled by the young Arabs who first came to Syria to take part in a revolution.

Another point which I doubt has escaped liberals is that, generally speaking, Al-Qaeda is unable to recruit new members itself; instead it leeches followers off the other, more peaceful Islamist movements (for example the Salafists, Muslim Brotherhood, Tabligh, and so on). The fierce battle in Egypt against the Brotherhood and the Salafists, who have both willingly subjected themselves to the principles of democracy and the peaceful of transfer of power, will drag the country into a downward spiral of self-perpetuating violence, with Al-Qaeda lurking in wait. An Al-Qaeda presence in the Egyptian arena is practically unheard of, just as it had been in Syria before the outbreak of the armed revolution.

 

More on: http://www.aawsat.net/2013/03/article55294885

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Egypte : "Ces politiciens ne nous représentent pas, ils ne veulent qu'un siège"

Egypte : "Ces politiciens ne nous représentent pas, ils ne veulent qu'un siège" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

L’opposition au gouvernement des Frères musulmans ne paraît toujours pas à la hauteur. Disparate, divisée, peu suivie, elle saurait mieux accuser que proposer. (...)

Le Front du Salut National regroupe trois figures majeures : deux anciens candidats à la présidentielle de 2012, Amr Moussa, ancien ministre des Affaires étrangères (sous Moubarak), et ancien secrétaire général de la Ligue Arabe, et Hamdeen Sabbahi, syndicaliste journaliste nassériste, et l’ancienne coqueluche des opposants à Moubarak, Mohamed el- Baradei, le libéral et ancien directeur de l’agence internationale pour l’Energie atomique.

Beaucoup de ceux qui les soutenaient, voire avaient voté pour eux aux dernières présidentielles, ne leur font plus confiance. Baradei ne serait bon qu’à se répandre en lamentations et invectives diverses sur Twitter, Amr Moussa courrait après un poste depuis toujours y compris sous Moubarak, et Hamdeen Sabbahi n’aurait pas digéré de n’arriver que troisième au premier tour de la présidentielle et attendrait toujours qu’on refasse le match.

« Ces politiciens ne nous représentent pas, ils ne veulent qu’un siège. A la rigueur, des journalistes comme Yosri Fouda ou un présentateur satirique comme Bassem Youssef font plus pour la liberté d’expression et élever le niveau de conscience politique ! » entend-on fréquemment chez les activistes.

Depuis deux ans, certains ont rendu leur tablier et se bouchent les oreilles à la moindre nouvelle politique, d’autres ont à cent reprises abandonné puis remis le couvert. Il faut dire que l’opposition aux Frères musulmans n’est pas la même que l’opposition du temps de Moubarak ou aux toutes premières heures du Conseil militaire : déjà il faut en ôter les sympathisants des Frères musulmans (même s’il faut reconnaître qu’un certain nombre fait défection) et ensuite y rajouter des tendances plus ou moins proches de l’ancien régime et de tout temps hostiles aux islamistes. (Afrik.com)

 

Plus : http://www.afrik.com/egypte-ces-politiciens-ne-nous-representent-pas-ils-ne-veulent-qu-un-siege


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Currency crisis hits Egypt’s wheat supply

Currency crisis hits Egypt’s wheat supply | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt, the world’s largest wheat importer, is struggling to buy the staple in the international market because of the impact of a currency crisis, creating a fresh challenge to the government of Mohamed Morsi, the Islamist president.

Grain traders shipping wheat to Egypt said Cairo had cut back on its overseas purchases as the Egyptian pound plunged against the US dollar. The slowdown has depleted the country’s grain stocks to unusually low levels, traders added.

Cairo on Wednesday said that government inventory levels of wheat, usually at enough to cover six months’ worth of consumption, had almost halved to just 101 days. “They are living hand-to-mouth,” said one Swiss-based international grain trader.

The Egyptian cabinet added that wheat reserves would stretch by another month with the arrival of supplies tendered for delivery in March and April.

With more than 40 per cent of Egyptians living below the poverty line, subsidised bread is an important part of the Egyptian government’s strategy for maintaining social peace. Lower inventories made it vulnerable to any supply disruptions, analysts and traders said. (Emiko Terazono in London and Heba Saleh in Cairo)


More : http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/828043ca-7608-11e2-8eb6-00144feabdc0.html

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Egypt in political clinch as economic cliff looms

Egypt in political clinch as economic cliff looms | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Two years after a pro-democracy uprising, Egypt resembles a rickety bus rolling towards a cliff, its passengers too busy feuding over blame to wrench the steering wheel to safety.

 

Foreign exchange reserves are dwindling. Tourism is moribund. Investment is at a standstill. Subsidised diesel fuel and fertiliser are in short supply, while the cost of subsidies is swelling the budget deficit unsustainably. The Egyptian pound has lost 14 percent of its value since the 2011 revolt. Dollars are scarce. An IMF loan that could unlock wider aid is on hold. Unemployment is rising. Public security has deteriorated, and arms smuggling is rife.

 

With little regard for the looming economic cliff, politicians in the most populous Arab nation are trading blows over an Islamist-tilted constitution, political violence and an alleged power grab by the Muslim Brotherhood.

 

To President Mohamed Mursi and his supporters in the Freedom and Justice Party, the Brotherhood's political arm, this is just a tough home stretch in Egypt's delayed transition to democracy.

With the strongest national machine, they confidently expect to win parliamentary elections in April or May, completing their conquest of the new democratic institutions, then set about reforming the country along conservative Islamic lines.(...)

 

Ziad Bahaa el-Din, a former investment authority chief who is now vice-president of the opposition Social Democratic party, says the Brotherhood, like past Egyptian rulers, is trying to secure its grip on power before tackling the country's problems.

 

"This has happened ever since (Ottoman pasha) Muhammad Ali slaughtered the Mamluks in the early 19th century," he said in an interview. "(Gamal Abdel) Nasser locked up the Muslim Brothers and the Communists in 1954. (Anwar) Sadat locked up his opponents in 1971.

Egypt-actus's insight:


"The difference now is that people's acceptance is no longer there. You cannot control public opinion, and the kind of economic problems we are facing cannot be postponed for a couple of years," he added.

 

Dan Kurzer, a former U.S. ambassador to Cairo now teaching at Princeton University, said Egypt was only in "round three of a 15-round heavyweight contest".

 

Among the players in the ring, he sees the Brotherhood, the military, the internal security forces, the revolutionary street, and what he called "the fourth heavyweight - old regime loyalists who may be off balance, in jail or in exile but who will be energised if the economy collapses".

 

More on: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Business/Analysis/2013/Feb-19/207030-egypt-in-political-clinch-as-economic-cliff-looms.ashx#axzz2LKUxyNtd

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Egypt Against Itself

Egypt Against Itself | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Weekly Standard, February 18, 2013, Vol. 18, No. 22 

This week marks the second anniversary of the fall of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak. Two years after the refrain “the people want to topple the regime” filled Tahrir Square, it is now Egypt itself that is toppling. Street violence has pitted various groups against each other—anarchists against Islamists, policemen against protesters, men against women—and has left scores dead throughout the country.

 

The economy is hemorrhaging reserves and incapable of securing foreign investment, while Egypt’s currency tumbles to record lows. The international community, captivated two years ago by the revolution, has little confidence that Egypt’s new rulers can make peace between the country’s feuding factions. If the conventional wisdom among Western policymakers holds that Egypt is too big to be allowed to fail, the stark reality is that by many measures it is already failing.

 

A $4.8 billion IMF loan has been put on hold pending President Mohamed Morsi’s stabilizing the political situation. The catch is that the loan requires a host of reforms, like slashing subsidies for fuel and household staples, that will cause yet more suffering across a wide swath of Egyptian society, most likely bringing further instability. Much of Egypt’s technocratic class is in exile or in jail, charged, often spuriously, with corruption under the old regime. Any of the liberal reform measures that might actually help set Egypt back on its feet are associated with precisely those figures that the revolution sought to punish.

 

More on: http://aijac.org.au/news/article/egypt-s-chaos-west-bank-realities#Article_1

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The coming crisis: Egypt’s food, energy faces uncertain future

The coming crisis: Egypt’s food, energy faces uncertain future | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt is on the brink. Socially, economically and politically. Within 6 months, the country could be facing an economic crisis of unparalleled catastrophe with the government’s coffers expected to be empty, not enough food to feed the growing population and an energy crisis that could leave the country nearly completely shutdown.

The near doomsday scenario is being discussed already by leaders of the economic and food sectors, stoking worries that the political unrest seen in the country in recent months could deteriorate even further if efforts are not made now to ward off disaster.

This week, the latest worry was petrol, and more specifically diesel. Diesel supplies are drying up as a cash-strapped government struggles to cap a mounting bill for subsidies it has promised the IMF it will reform to secure an elusive $4.8 billion loan desperately needed to keep a sagging economy afloat.

Adding to that fear is the fact that Egypt’s foreign reserves are down below $15 billion, less than three months’ imports, despite deposits from Qatar and Turkey. The Egyptian pound has lost 8 percent of its value this year and a black market has emerged for hard currency. (Joseph Mayton/Bikya news)

 

More : http://bikyanews.com/85541/the-coming-crisis-egypts-food-energy-faces-uncertain-future/

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Egypt at Another Crossroads

Egypt at Another Crossroads | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt, arguably the most important Arab state, again finds itself at a crossroads, with growing public unrest challenging the increasingly authoritarian rule of the Muslim Brotherhood-backed President Mohamed Morsi. Even some observers who had hopes for Morsi are alarmed, as Adil E. Shamoo notes.

 

Egypt is rapidly approaching its most acute political and economic crisis since the 2011 revolution that swept dictator Hosni Mubarak from power.

Poverty is at an all-time high of 25 percent, with youth unemployment at a record 40 percent. Foreign currency reserves are on a rapid decline. President Mohamed Morsi is losing the most important commodity he possesses — the people’s confidence and trust. Conditions seem ripe for either a new uprising from below or a new military coup from above.

 

Instead of cementing his new regime’s democratic credentials, Morsi has undermined the legitimacy of his rule in word and deed. For example, immediately after collaborating with President Barack Obama to broker a ceasefire in Gaza last November, Morsi issued a decree giving himself sweeping powers not even enjoyed by Mubarak. If Morsi thought his usefulness to the Obama administration would persuade Washington to look the other way during his power grabs, the administration has done little to correct him.

 

Regime critics have held massive demonstrations in Tahrir Square and in several other cities. Although many Christians and secularists have joined the recent demonstrations, the overwhelming majority of the demonstrators have been Muslims, with most of the women in Tahrir Square donning headdresses. (...)

 

In the past, I have been very optimistic about the future of Egypt’s revolution. I continued to be optimistic when the Muslim Brotherhood came to power through free and democratic elections. I overlooked some of the more inartful statements and acts by Brotherhood leaders as part of the democratic struggle on the bumpy road to full democracy. With some exceptions, Egyptians seemed to agree.

 

But now Morsi has to prove himself worthy of that trust. He must push the next parliament into amending the constitution to give complete and equal freedom to Egyptians regardless of gender or religion, reduce the number of military members in the national defense council, and bring the military budget under the auspices of the parliament.

 

More on: http://consortiumnews.com/2013/02/13/egypt-at-another-crossroads/

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Tunisie et Egypte: crise idéologique sur fond de crise économique

Tunisie et Egypte: crise idéologique sur fond de crise économique | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Pas évident d'établir une stabilité économique et d'écrire une constitution après une révolution qui a chassé une dictature de plus de trois décennies. La Tunisie et l'Egypte connaissent des difficultés similaires.

Les raisons économiques ont été la principale cause des révoltes qui ont embrasé la région et dès la chute des dictateurs, des critères idéologiques se sont ajoutés à la crise. (...). Les tensions accroissent les divisions et les difficultés pour créer un Etat stable permettant de mettre fin à la crise idéologique, politique (constitutionnelle) et économique.

 

Crise idéologique
(...)

Selon Taoufik Djebali, professeur de civilisation américaine et de sociologie à l'Université de Caen "les islamistes ne sont pas des démocrates. Leur alliance avec le Qatar et leur proximité idéologique avec l'Arabie Saoudite sont les vrais problèmes". M. Djebali, qui retourne chaque année en Tunisie pour enseigner en tant que professeur invité explique que "rien n'a été fait pour écrire la constitution, rien pour l'emploi mais que des débats sur la burqa, l'identité, l'islam, la laïcité...". Il ajoute que "les islamistes en Tunisie comme en Egypte ne sont pas capable de faire la transition démocratique".

Cette division idéologique, alimentée par des discours populistes et identitaires des acteurs politiques, mais également de chaines comme Al Jazeera, augmentent les risques de tensions et d'assassinats des éléments modérés. (...)

Aujourd'hui, ce risque de radicalisation est très présent en Tunisie et en Egypte. (....)

L'instabilité économique rend difficile la construction politique

En plus des divisions idéologiques, la crise économique tunisienne créée une instabilité et un manque de perspectives favorables à l'écriture d'une constitution ainsi qu'à la construction de solides institutions politiques. Aujourd'hui, la Tunisie et l'Egypte ont besoin d'argent. (...)

Il en va de même en Egypte où la crise financière s'accroit de manière trop importante, et le prix du blé est prévu à la hausse. Les tensions et divisions dans le pays vont au rythme de la crise financière.

 

Plus: http://www.huffingtonpost.fr/milad-jokar/violences-tunisie_b_2661913.html?utm_hp_ref=france

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Al-Watan propose initiative to solve Egypt’s crisis

Al-Watan propose initiative to solve Egypt’s crisis | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Joel Gulhane | Daily news Egypt

 

The Al-Watan Party proposed a new initiative on Wednesday in an attempt to solve the current economic and political crisis in Egypt. The Salafi party put forward a 13-point plan called “The Charter of Honour and National Responsibility”.

In a statement the party outlined the plan and the different elements of the crisis in Egypt, both economic and political. Al-Watan recommended that the initiative be implemented by whichever party or bloc wins the upcoming parliamentary elections.

The plan provides 13 recommendations for the new government which include achieving reconciliation between political parties, the establishment of an economic development committee, inclusive governance, social justice, education reform, equality and youth employment.

The plan places great importance on working to solve the economic crisis through international investment and increasing employment, especially amongst the Egyptian youth.

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/03/13/al-watan-propose-initiative-to-solve-egypts-crisis/

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The Spectre haunting Egypt

The Spectre haunting Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

We are overwhelmed by the latest breaking story, and this past week there have been an unnerving number of them. But a sense of an intensifying crisis – until now a largely ignored economic as well as the obvious political crisis has been intensifying since late November. The street violence has been escalating ever since.  This is not to even mention the rising unemployment, periodic banditry on the highways, the looting and land seizures at archaeological sites across the country, garbage littered streets and an epidemic of car theft all of which preceded Mursi taking power.

What is different about much of the violence now and the street fighting back in January-February 2011 is that during the Tahrir Uprising, the protestors did not initiate the violence. It was the security forces then – police and riot police who attacked, and then when repulsed, were replaced by thugs and the tourist -trade camel riders, who were fought off largely by the experienced street fighters of the Ultras – organized fanatic football fans who have a deep and reciprocated hated of the police, and who rallied to Tahrir, as they would to any other cause providing an opportunity to fight the police. Alongside them then were the Muslim Brotherhood Youth who brought a strong almost Leninist sense of party discipline to the organization of security measures to protect Tahrir during those 18 days from both attacks and infiltration.

Taking the initiative

Now it is the demonstrators who are almost always taking the initiative and attacking the security forces -- be they Cairo Ahali Ultras -- protesting a court ruling letting off policemen accused of being party to the death of more than 70 mostly Ahali fans in Port Said more than a year ago -- and putting a Police Club and the offices of the Egyptian Football Federation on fire ,or the protestors on the opposite side of the Nile.

They are a different band, overwhelmingly street kids and unemployed youth who have taken the initiative in attacking security forces while attempting to block traffic on the Corniche – the main downtown artery near Tahrir and setting on fire two Egyptian owned restaurants nearby (believed to be owned by Muslim Brotherhood businessmen),as well as attacking the Five-Star Semiramis Hotel, throwing stones and Molotov cocktails. “Why are you attacking the hotel” the photojournalist Cliff Cheny who has been covering most of the action, asked the demonstrators.. “Because the police are protecting the hotel” replied one of the young men.

 

More on: http://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/2013/03/13/The-Spectre-haunting-Egypt.html

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"Egypt: Ministry of Chaos", by Steven A. Cook

"Egypt: Ministry of Chaos", by Steven A. Cook | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The lawlessness and seemingly senseless violence that has descended upon Egypt in recent weeks has led some Egyptians to wonder whether March 2013 is the modern analogue to January 1952.  Black Sunday, as it came to be known, was a spasm of violence that engulfed Cairo after British forces killed a group of Egyptian policeman in the city of Ismailia.  That day of rage—January 25—culminated in a fire in downtown Cairo that destroyed movie theaters, restaurants, and clubs.  Debate continues over who started the fires with some contending it was the Muslim Brotherhood and other arguing that it was provocateurs associated with the Free Officers.  Regardless, Black Sunday set in motion a chain of events that led to the Free Officers coup of July 1952.

It could happen again.  Egypt is hanging by a thread.  The military, which is already in the streets in Port Said—a city that has been in open revolt for more than a month—may find it has no other choice as if the situation deteriorates further.  My friend, Issandr el Amrani, offers a compelling explanation of the violence in a recent column in The National.  He focuses the build of his attention on the so-called “Ultras,” who were the shock troops of the revolution and heroes to many, but who are little more than anarchists engaged in violence for the sake of violence. Issandr also touches on the problems associated with the Ministry of Interior, which is notorious for its brutality.  And while everyone agrees that the Ministry is badly in need of reform, neither the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces during its eighteen-month tenure holding executive power nor President Mohammed Morsi has been willing to move against this redoubt of the old regime.  Why?  Given the profound way Egyptians loathe the Ministry of Interior, it seems that the potential political payoff of sacking the police generals who run the place would be too hard to resist.(Council Foreign relations)

 

More : http://blogs.cfr.org/cook/2013/03/11/egypt-ministry-of-chaos/

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Egypt shuts down

Egypt shuts down | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Energy crisis drives taxi and bus operators to cease work; police officers’ strike prompts debate about ‘private security committees’.

 

Egypt’s descent into anarchy due to its government’s inability to establish order and a continuing energy shortage lead all major Arab newspapers.


 

“Egyptian interior minister: Army cannot secure the country alone” reads the main headline of the Saudi-owned A-Sharq Al-Awsat, a paper known for its staunch hostility to the Muslim Brotherhood. In response to the violent protests against the Egyptian government that have taken place in cities along Suez Canal and north of Cairo, thousands of low-ranking police officers have gone on strike to express their disapproval of the Islamist politicization of the police force.

The result has been a complete breakdown in government control of major Egyptian population centers. Fearing a seizure of power by the Egyptian Armed Forces and fighting immense criticism for his handling of the police officers’ strike, Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim says “the army cannot secure the country alone.”

The London-based Al-Hayat reports that Ibrahim has expressed “willingness to resign on the spot if that will resolve the crisis.” However, he insists that all that must be done to restore order is to “keep rioters away from sensitive security areas and order will be restored within one month.”

In light of the security breakdown, the widespread vandalism of public property, and the thousands of people who have been wounded in the rioting, a group of Muslim Brotherhood legislators have proposed a law calling for the establishment of “popular security committees” by private Egyptian citizens to defend their neighborhoods and restore order, according to the London-based Al Quds Al-Arabi.

 

Justifying the creation of these “committees,” the legislators released a statement saying “the nation is exposed to vigorous attempts to abort the Egyptian revolution and sabotage Egypt from the inside.”

The National Salvation Front, the leading political opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood-led Egyptian government, categorically rejected the proposal, warning it would be the precursor to the forming of armed militias that would plunge the country into a real civil war.

 

However, Hassan Yassin, an adviser to Egypt’s attorney general, expressed support for the formation of security committees.

“It would give citizens the right to stop perpetrators of criminal offenses as long as they caught them in flagrant violation and handed them over to the nearest policeman,” he said.

 

More on:  http://www.timesofisrael.com/egypt-shuts-down/

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DEAR AMERICA: Things Are Falling Apart In Egypt

DEAR AMERICA: Things Are Falling Apart In Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A letter from a woman in Cairo.

 

I have been in correspondence with a thirty-something college-educated woman who lives in Cairo with her family.

 

I've had her identity independently verified. Until now, she was reluctant to have her story published, and still asks we not use her name.

But things are getting bad over there and she wants American to know.

 

Here's a letter from Egypt:

 

I'm very frustrated. I'm angry. We're seeing total security vacuum in some places in Cairo - total absence of security forces (police); non-stop clashes and deaths spilling out from Portstaid to at least 2 more governorates.

Too many deaths — protesters and policemen and military. The police are cracking down on protesters and in other places they're absent and thugs are controlling the streets in downtown and in front of Semiramis Hotel. And we're seeing severe shortage of solar, which is causing awful traffic jams almost everywhere and strikes by taxi and truck drivers. 

Muslim Brotherhood (MB) students are losing in student university union elections — they won in two universities but lost in several other places. 

Why is the USA giving any money to Egypt? Why does Obama Administration still support the MB?

The government is ignoring the events and protests; the Interior Ministry is heavily involved in what's happening and they too are angry because of casualties among them.

Something wrong is going on. Why is the USA silent?

Do they want another Syria? Obama doesn't know that this atmosphere helps homegrown extremists to do what they want inside and outside the country?

Some newspapers criticize Morsi and his government and policies, but that's not enough. Why did the US use harsh language with Mubarak and not doing the same with Morsi?

What kind of experience do the MB have to run the country? Did you hear about the "Powers of Attorney" by tens of citizens in Portsaid and other places for General Al-Sisi to run the country?

It is all too much to bear, believing that nobody, anywhere, really cares.



More on: http://www.businessinsider.com/whats-happening-in-cairo-egypt-2013-3?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+businessinsider%2Fpolitics+%28Business+Insider+-+Politix%29
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Morsi plays it cool while Egypt crumbles

Morsi plays it cool while Egypt crumbles | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is facing withering criticism and a dangerous public backlash in the wake of his controversial announcement over the weekend to hold parliamentary elections at the end of April, Arab newspapers report. (...).

 

In a television interview with the Dubai-based media channel al-Arabiya, President Morsi calmly reassures that parliamentary elections are the first step towards bringing Egypt to real political and economic stability.

 

“I invite all political forces to come together to ensure that the elections will be held with transparency and integrity,” Morsi said. “These are the first steps on the right path to achieve what is necessary for the Egyptian people.”

 

Furthermore, Morsi denied any bad blood between his administration and the Egyptian military, insisting that he has always seen the army playing a strong role in the affairs of the state. (...). Morsi vowed to visit Port Said in the very near future.

When he does, however, he may well receive a stormy reception. Protests and calls for civil disobedience are continuing for an eighth straight day in Port Said.

 

The Saudi-owned a-Sharq al-Awsat reports that the entire Suez Canal port complex was shut down yesterday when demonstrators blocked off the customs authority and all transportation leading up to it. (...)

This prompted Talaat Afifi, Egypt’s minister of religious endowments, to issue a public outcry against such action.

 

“The sole beneficiaries of the calls for civil disobedience and the disabling of state institutions are the enemies of the nation who dream of halting its march toward reconstruction and to prevent it from getting rid of a corrupt governmental system,” Afifi said.

“Islam totally rejects all claims of sabotage and violence and the disruption of people’s interests. Islamic law does not allow for the destabilization of communities.”

 

The London-based daily al-Quds al-Arabi reveals that a small number of protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square managed to completely shut down the Mogamma, the massive governmental services building that serves as the centerpiece of the Egyptian bureaucracy. In blocking access, 18,000 Egyptian government workers were unable to get to work.

 

According to witnesses, “the protesters did not enter the building complex,” but “confirmed that they will not allow anyone else to enter the compound either.”

 

More on: http://www.timesofisrael.com/morsi-plays-it-cool-while-egypt-crumbles/

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U.S. needs to show Egypt some tough love

U.S. needs to show Egypt some tough love | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry need to pay attention to Egypt — now. The most populous Arab country, poster child of the Arab Spring, faces a looming economic crisis and a widespread breakdown in law and order, including increasingly prevalent crime and rape. Either will cripple Egypt’s faltering effort to become a stable democracy.

The Obama administration has treated Egypt primarily as an economic problem and has urged Cairo to move quickly to satisfy International Monetary Fund (IMF) demands to qualify for financing. But there is no separating Egypt’s economic crisis from its political crisis — or from the failures of its current government. Egypt’s economy is struggling, and disorder is rampant primarily because the country’s leaders the past two years — first the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, now President Mohamed Morsi — have failed to build an inclusive political process. Until they do, no amount of IMF funding will make a difference.

 

Although Morsi won a narrow victory last summer, he has yet to learn what it means to lead in a democratic society. His Muslim Brotherhood is Egypt’s strongest political force, but it does not command a majority of public support. It cannot simply force its will on the nation, especially one still aroused by the spirit of revolution. Morsi can hardly take on urgent tasks, such as the cutting of wasteful fuel subsidies and the reformation of a corrupt interior ministry and police force, when much of the country is against him and ready to take to the streets at the least provocation.

 

Under Morsi’s rule, Egyptian society has become polarized between Islamists and non-Islamists. Enraging the political opposition late last year, he railroaded through a new constitution that contains inadequate protections for the rights of women and non-Muslims and leaves open the possibility of Islamic clerical oversight of legislation. (....)

 

The increasingly desperate secular opposition parties have formed a “National Salvation Front,” but under the surface they are divided between those who want to force Morsi to compromise and those who want to force him from power. Even though most favor the economic reforms necessary to get an IMF loan, many feel they must mobilize street protests against any Morsi action.

 

The result is that, with Egypt at the edge of bankruptcy — it has enough reserves to pay for only three more months of food and fuel imports — the government and the opposition are locked in a game of chicken. The economy is sinking, political conflict is rising and the security situation is deteriorating.

 

More on: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/time-to-get-tough-with-egypt-and-morsi/2013/02/20/7e1343c6-7aba-11e2-82e8-61a46c2cde3d_story.html

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Crise politique : L'Egypte dans un cercle vicieux

Crise politique : L'Egypte dans un cercle vicieux | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Les efforts s’intensifient pour trouver un dénouement à la crise politique entre les islamistes au pouvoir et l'opposition. Pourtant, les manifestations et la violence se poursuivent. Etat des lieux. (...)

La violence se poursuit donc à un moment où le dialogue politique entre les islamistes au pouvoir et l’opposition reste bloqué malgré les efforts pour désamorcer la crise. Le dialogue national parrainé par la présidence de la République et qui devait se tenir cette semaine a été reporté sine die. C’est d’ailleurs dans ce contexte que le président Morsi s’est entretenu avec l’opposant Ayman Nour sur les moyens d’apaiser la tension. Dans des déclarations aux médias, Nour a dit que le président avait renouvelé son appel aux forces de l’opposition en vue de reprendre le dialogue national tout en s’engageant à répondre à leurs revendications sur les amendements constitutionnels et les garanties nécessaires à la transparence des prochaines élections législatives. Parallèlement, Saad Al-Katatni, président du Parti Liberté et justice, bras politique de la confrérie des Frères musulmans, a rencontré, samedi à huis clos, Mohamed ElBaradei, coordinateur du Front National du Salut (FNS, ombrelle de partis de l’opposition laïque). Les deux hommes ont évoqué les conditions du FNS pour reprendre le dialogue national. De même, des dirigeants du parti salafiste Al-Nour se sont réunis avec des dirigeants du FNS pour mettre au point l’initiative d’arrêt de la violence, lancée parAl-Nour la semaine dernière. Amr Moussa, Al-Sayed Al-Badawi et Amr Hamzawi, présidents respectifs des partis du Congrès, d’Al-Wafd et de l’Egypte la liberté, ont pris part à la réunion, ainsi qu’Achraf Sabet, président adjoint du parti Al-Nour.

Le FNS s’est dit prêt à participer au dialogue national si la présidence accepte de soumettre à un vote les décisions prises lors de ces réunions, de désigner les personnalités qui vont gérer le dialogue et de signer à l’issue de chaque séance de dialogue un procès-verbal récapitulant les décisions prises. Les gestes de rapprochement continuent donc mais le manque de confiance sévit d’un côté comme de l’autre. Plusieurs facteurs ont contribué à cet état de blocage, dont le refus de Morsi d’assouplir sa position face aux conditions de l’opposition pour reprendre le dialogue. (May Al-Maghrabi/Al-Ahram Hebdo)

 

Plus : http://hebdo.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/962/1/130/1763/Crise-politique%C2%A0-LEgypte-dans-un-cercle-vicieux.aspx

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Allowing the Egyptian state to fall

Allowing the Egyptian state to fall | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

From the very first moments and till the regime was actually topped, I and many others warned of the difference between toppling a regime and toppling a state. During the past two years, there have been attempts at destroying, or at least dwarfing, the pillars of the state. Several political and youth factions took part in those attempts unknowingly after being deceived by other factions that have clear goals so that they ended up not differentiating between toppling a regime and toppling a state.

 

Organized attacks have recently targeted the main pillars of the state like security, economy, relations between political factions, the judiciary, and the army. Some of those attempts relatively succeeded in affecting many of those pillars while other institutions managed to rescue themselves. What is certain is that we are now paying for what Egypt has witnessed during the past two years.

Available options

We are still facing the same challenges, for we were deceived into thinking that we have reached stability while the truth is that the ruling clique, which is not different from the one that remained in power till the end of 2010, decided to monopolize power in the country. We are left with one of two options: either giving in or engaging in confrontations. It is not clear why the ruling faction is trying to destroy the pillars of society through instigating conflicts between the police and the people so that one of the two has to be repressed. What is also not clear is this indifference towards the financial conditions of the country, and making it seem like the best achievement is securing more loans and the most effective economic initiative is selling a bank or a financial institution to Qatar or importing more goods from Turkey. (...)

 

More on: http://english.alarabiya.net/views/2013/02/15/266390.html ;

 

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ElBaradei: Egypt 'is a failed state' (CNN Video)

Becky Anderson talks to Mohamed ElBaradei, Egyptian opposition politician, about Morsy, the IMF and the country's future.
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Les tensions s'exacerbent en Egypte

La dette égyptienne a été dégradée mardi soir par l'agence Moody's, à B3, pour la cinquième fois depuis la chute d'Hosni Moubarak, il y a exactement deux ans. L'agence a justifié sa décision par les tensions politiques, illustrées par des affrontements encore lundi entre des centaines de jeunes et la police devant le palais du président issu des Frères musulmans, Mohammed Morsi. Un garde du corps du gouverneur de la banque centrale, Hisham Ramez, a aussi été tué hier lors d'une attaque sur sa voiture. Moody's estime que l'octroi d'un crédit crucial de 4,8 milliards de dollars du Fonds monétaire international est menacé par la crise politique. Alors que les réserves de change sont tombées à 13,6 milliards de dollars, les négociations avec leFMI doivent reprendre bientôt après des mois d'interruption, mais le parti salafiste allié au Premier ministre a estimé mardi que ce crédit devrait être soumis aux autorités religieuses pour juger s'il est conforme à la charia. (Yves Bourdillon/Les Echos)

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Int'l Conference For Supporting Egypt's Economy Is Necessary: Amr Moussa

Int'l Conference For Supporting Egypt's Economy Is Necessary: Amr Moussa | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

There are more than an interior and exterior regional player in the Arab region, said Amr Moussa, Former Secretary General of the Arab League; referring that the Arab world and Middle East is facing a critical period.

Moussa has referred to the significance of holding an international conference to bolster the Egyptian economy with the upcoming years; clarifying that Egypt needs a financial push to revive the economy. This matter requires well management and taking rapid necessary decisions at the suitable time.

In statements on the sidelines of International Conference of Council for Arab and International Relations, kicked off yesterday, Moussa described the changes occur in the Arab world as radical so we can't back to square one; elucidating that the Arab people are witnessing a radical change, which is a development in itself. Therefore, this development should be accompanied by improvements in how to manage the concerns of the Middle East.

 

The initiative launched by Al Nour Party is convenient to the initiative of the National Salvation Front (NSF) over a national salvation cabinet and changing a number of current policies, Moussa said. Despite that, the Egyptian president hasn't approved forming new government so far, although the new government is a key matter in improving the level of the political and economic policies.

 

More on: http://amwalalghad.com/en/news/egypt-news/14355-intl-conference-for-supporting-egypts-economy-is-necessary-amr-moussa.html

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