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Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Egypt : the latest hero, blinded in his pursuit of freedom

Egypt : the latest hero, blinded in his pursuit of freedom | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Ahmad Harara, twice blinded in the struggle to bring freedom to Egypt, was back in Tahrir Square on Wednesday, a fresh bandage over what had been his last good eye.

A crowd of well-wishers surrounded him anxious to see the people's latest hero, even if he could not see them.

Hundreds have been killed in Egypt this year, fighting against unforgiving regimes bent on maintaining their hold on power whatever the cost. But Mr Harara has paid a higher price than most from those who have survived.

In late January, during the bloodiest phase of the uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak, he was shot in one eye by a shotgun pellet fired by the security forces near Tahrir Square.

This weekend he returned to the same place, determined to join the protests against the military leadership." (Adrian Blomfield/The Telegraph)

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Gorbachev backs Egypt protesters

Gorbachev backs Egypt protesters | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, whose reforms helped lead to the fall of communism, has thrown his weight behind the pro-democracy protests in Egypt, saying they were "well-grounded and of vital importance".

"I am on the protesters' side," the 80-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner said. (...)

Mr Gorbachev said leaders across the Arab world were now faced with rising calls for democracy because they had been in power for too long and had created situations where people's voices had not been heard." (Independent.ie)

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Violence, Uncertainty in Egypt Could Affect US Policy

Violence, Uncertainty in Egypt Could Affect US Policy | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"White House spokesman Jay Carney said, “The United States continues to believe that the tragic events, that these tragic events, rather, should not stand in the way of elections and a continued transition to democracy.”

Egypt is the anchor of American foreign policy in the Middle East and its strategic importance is huge, says University of Maryland professor Shibley Telhami. “Egypt is the most populous and influential Arab state. What happens there will be consequential for other American interests, including in the Gulf, how the Gulf States will behave or how they will interpret it. So for all these reasons there is much at stake for the U.S," he said." (Meredith Buel/Voice of America)

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Tantawi : Muzzling the Revived Spirit of Tahrir

Tantawi  : Muzzling the Revived Spirit of Tahrir | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"In a Televised speech eerily reminiscent in form and content of those made by Mubarak before his ouster, head of Egypt’s ruling military council Muhammad Tantawi did little to address the fears and demands of hundreds of thousands of Egyptian who took to the streets over the last few days in what many saw as a revival of the spirit of the January 25 revolution. (...)

The high number of deaths has caused alarm over the extent of force used against protesters.

Many Egyptians fear that the new tear gas used by the interior ministry and armed forces to disperse protesters. Not all protesters, it seems were shot dead.

Some protesters suffocated after inhaling the newly introduced tear gas that was recently imported as part of the swap deal releasing Ilan Grapel, who was accused of spying for Israel.

Tear gas causes temporary incapacitation and, occasionally, seizures. The new CR teargas, developed by the British Ministry of Defense as early as the 1960’s, may cause death. It causes severe skin irritation, muscle cramps and breathing difficulties. It may also result in temporary incapacitation and tremors in arms and legs. Exposure to large quantities of the gas may also be lethal.

The effects of the CR gas are approximately 6 to 10 times more powerful than those of the CS gas. The Israeli occupation army may have used the CR gas against protesters in January 2011, leading to the death of Jawaher Abu Rahma. Saddam Hussein succeeded in manufacturing CS gas in the 70s. He developed and used it against Kurds in Iraq and against Iran during the Iraq/Iran war." (Muhammed Shuair/alakhbar)

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El futuro de Egipto, por Fawaz A. Gerges

"La brecha entre lo laico y lo religioso constituye la fractura fundamental en la política egipcia, un foso que pone en peligro la transición del autoritarismo al pluralismo. Profundamente desconfiadas con relación al compromiso de los partidos islamistas en lo concerniente a la pluralidad, las fuerzas laicas han apelado a las actuales autoridades militares de Egipto para que adopten las oportunas medidas preventivas destinadas a limitar la influencia y poder de sus rivales ideológicos en caso de que triunfen en las urnas. Quieren que una nueva Constitución garantice efectivamente las libertades de religión y expresión." (La Vanguardia)

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Vestiges of Mubarak’s Order Stifle Birth of New Egypt

Vestiges of Mubarak’s Order Stifle Birth of New Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The vestiges of Mr. Mubarak’s order — the military, the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamists, or fragmented liberals and leftists — seem ill prepared to navigate the transition from his rule. It is an altogether more difficult reckoning that has echoed in the Arab revolts in Syria, Libya, Yemen and Bahrain.

The strategy that for so long successfully repressed public anger and sapped people’s will to rebel was no longer working. As a result, it is not at all clear what path Egypt will find to go forward. The authorities hoped that the protesters would exhaust themselves and go home, but they have not. The military tried violence, but it has not worked. It has tried limited concessions, but they did not work. And it has blamed foreigners for inciting the violence, and that did not work." (Anthony Shadid/The New York Times)

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Unconvinced by army’s promises, Egypt protesters battle on to end military rule

Unconvinced by army’s promises, Egypt protesters battle on to end military rule | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Less than two hours after the speech by Egypt’s military ruler Field Marshal Mohammed Hussein Tantawi, clashes have erupted again on Mohammed Mahmoud Street, a sign that activists and politician say indicates that the nation’s military rulers are following the former regime’s failed strategy to remain in power. (...)

Tantawi angered many of the youthful demonstrators on Cairo’s Tahrir Square and in other cities by suggesting a referendum on whether military rule should end earlier - a move many saw as a ploy to appeal to the many Egyptians who fear further upheaval and to divide those from the young activists.

“Leave! Leave!” came the chants in Cairo, according to Reuters, and, in an echo of February’s chorus: “The people want to topple the marshal.” (Al-Arabiya)

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22 political movements form government of national salvation

22 political movements form government of national salvation | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"A total of 22 movements and political parties announced their consent to Egyptian Prime Minister Essam Sharaf government’s resignation. They decided to form a government of a national salvation within a week with full authorities to rule Egypt’s affairs.

They called upon Egypt’s ruling military council to return back to its main role, which is to protect the borders and rule the armed forces affairs only.

The movements determined the government of national salvation’s roles as follows;

• Open an immediate investigation in incidents.
• Send those involved in killing the demonstrators to fair judiciary trials.
• Implement the People’s assembly and Shura’s council procedures and then the presidential elections during a period no later than May 2012.
• Announce and apply a secured plan to eliminate instability.
• Cleanse the Ministry of Interior of corruptors.
• Announce a short economic plan to refresh Egypt’s economy.
• Applying minimum and maximum wages." (Noura Fakhry/Youm7)

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Egypt protesters sing the same revolutionary tunes

Egypt protesters sing the same revolutionary tunes | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"n the Egyptian capital's Tahrir Square where a popular uprising ousted president Hosni Mubarak's regime in February, tens of thousands of demonstrators are singing the same revolutionary tunes once again. (...)

But instead of chanting "The people want the fall of the regime," the crowds now shout "The people want the fall of the field marshal," in reference to Hussein Tantawi who heads the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF)."

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Why Coptic Christians worry about Egypt

Why Coptic Christians worry about Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"When the government chose a Christian governor in Upper Egypt, the Islamists refused to accept the appointment. They closed the railroad tracks and blocked the highways to the province for two weeks. Even while the current constitution forbids the formation of political parties based on religion, there exist today close to a dozen Islamic parties, and thousands of candidates ready to take on parliamentary elections due to start this month. Muslim leaders announced that they expect the Muslim Brotherhood to vie for 50 percent of the seats with an additional 30 percent of the parliamentary seats going to a coalition of other Islamic parties. The Muslim Brotherhood’s newly established Freedom and Justice Party “rejects the candidacy of women or Copts for Egypt’s presidency.” (Dr. Sherif Meleka)

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Une présidentielle mi-2012 et un référendum en vue

Une présidentielle mi-2012 et un référendum en vue | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Le pouvoir espère ainsi calmer la révolte et maintenir les législatives prévues la semaine prochaine. (...)

Sur la place Tahrir, des dizaines de milliers d'Egyptiens ont continué de réclamer la fin du pouvoir militaire, accusé de chercher à s'incruster et de perpétuer le système répressif hérité du président Hosni Moubarak. Poussé au départ le 11 février à la suite d'une révolte populaire, Hosni Moubarak avait remis ses pouvoirs à l'armée, faisant du maréchal Tantaoui le nouveau chef de l'Etat de facto.

Certains manifestants ont affirmé ne pas croire un mot du discours du maréchal. "Nous ne pouvons pas croire ce qu'il dit. La balle était dans le camp du conseil militaire pendant des mois et ils n'ont rien fait", affirme Ibtissam al-Hamalawy, 50 ans." (Le Nouvel Observateur)

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Tahrir 2011-11-22 : Dispatch and Triage

Vidéo proposée par Issandr El-Amrani

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Candidates suspend electoral campaigns in solidarity with Tahrir demos

Candidates suspend electoral campaigns in solidarity with Tahrir demos | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Many candidates running in upcoming parliamentary elections have suspended campaigning in solidarity with Tahrir Square demonstrations. They are protesting the violence used by security services against the demonstrators. Muslim Brotherhood’s candidates, however, have continued to campaign.

“It is unbecoming to campaign while the demonstrators are assaulted,” said Khaled Shaaban, a candidate of the Egyptian Bloc."  (al-Masry al-Youm)

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Egypt: fourth night of protests in Tahrir Square – in pictures

Egypt: fourth night of protests in Tahrir Square – in pictures | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Clashes continue between demonstrators and police in Tahrir Square amid calls for Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi to step down...
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In Egypt, Split Seen Between Protesters, Organized Political Groups

Violent clashes between protesters and security forces continued Tuesday in central Cairo, but the country's military rulers appeared to give ground on political reforms. Jeffrey Brown discusses what's next for Egypt's "unfinished revolution" with Mervat Hatem of Howard University.

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Egypt protesters battle on to end army rule

Egypt protesters battle on to end army rule | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

* Military chief promises swifter move to civilian rule

* Protesters unconvinced, dig in for push to oust marshal

* Parliamentary elections confirmed for next week

* Cabinet which offered military immunity resigns

* Army suggests referendum on ending political role now

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Egypt is at its most fragile since the fall of Mubarak

Egypt is at its most fragile since the fall of Mubarak | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"After eight months of post-Mubarak uncertainty in Egypt, this week was supposed to mark the beginning of an era in which citizens could take the country back into their own hands through a newly-forged democracy.But after the violent confrontations between protesters and security forces in Tahrir Square and around the country that started on Saturday and caused the deaths of at least 33 people and injuries to more than 1,500, the road map for transferring power from the military to a civilian government is under threat.

Egypt is going through one of its most fragile moments since Hosni Mubarak stepped down on February 11 amid a massive uprising. (...)

The protests in Tahrir Square have revealed a new fissure among voters, dividing those who believe the only way to build a true democracy is to sweep out the current interim government from those who want to go ahead with next week's elections.

"Most of the people in the square don't even care about the elections," said Ramy Yaccoub, a political strategist who has spent the past several days observing the events in Tahrir Square.

"The feeling is that the elections are a hoax, that the only way to preserve the revolution is to cleanse the [military] government and the cabinet." (Bradley Hope/The National)

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Egypt mufti denies discrimination

Egypt mufti denies discrimination | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Egypt's highest Islamic legal official denied on Tuesday that Christians faced sectarian discrimination and said Islamists would win no more than 20 per cent of votes in next week's election.

Grand Mufti Ali Gomaa said Egypt had done its best to abolish discrimination against Copts, who make up 10 per cent of Egypt's roughly 80 million population, but a small minority of radical salafist Islamists were causing trouble.
"There is no real problem," said Gomaa, Egypt's second-highest Islamic official, whose office oversees the issuing of fatwas, or religious decrees, on application of Muslim law.
The clash last month "was not sectarian violence", he told Reuters at a Catholic-Muslim dialogue conference at the Jordan River in Jordan. "This just echoes the chaotic transition period we have been going through in Egypt." he said." (The Egyptian Gazette/Reuters)

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Deal to Hasten Transition in Egypt Is Jeered at Protests

Deal to Hasten Transition in Egypt Is Jeered at Protests | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The agreement, which centered on a presidential election by late June, appeared unlikely to extinguish the resurgent protest movement — the largest since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak nine months ago. The crowd roared its disapproval when the deal was announced at 8 p.m., fighting spiked on the avenue leading to the Interior Ministry, and the number of protesters continued to swell.

Unlikely to satisfy the public demands for the military to leave power, the deal may have driven a new wedge into the opposition, reopening a divide between the seething public and the political elite, between liberals and Islamists and, as events unfolded, among the Islamists themselves.(...)

Protesters are demanding that the military council, at the least, begin immediately delegating domestic decision making to a newly empowered civilian government that would replace the current civilian prime minister and cabinet, who have been charged solely with carrying out the generals’ orders. But instead the generals agreed only to install a new apolitical “technocrat” government that would continue to do the same." (David D. Kirkpatrick/Thed New York Times)

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Egyptian protesters reject military's timetable for elections

Egyptian protesters reject military's timetable for elections | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Egypt's revolution has been plunged into fresh uncertainty after hundreds of thousands of angry demonstrators rejected a promise by the country's military council on Tuesday to accelerate the transition to civilian rule.

In an extraordinary display of people power, protesters at a mass rally in Cairo's Tahrir Square demanded the immediate departure of Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, the head of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Scaf), just as they had demanded President Hosni Mubarak's humiliating exit in February.

"We are not leaving, he leaves," the crowd chanted." (Ian Black, Middle East editor, and Jack Shenker in Cairo/The Guardian,)

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Quelques échos en direct du Caire (23/11/2011)

Quelques échos en direct du Caire (23/11/2011) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

De Claude Guibal (journaliste française, auteur de "L'Egypte de Tahrir" - Seuil) :

- "Quick update : after another tense night, Egypt is now at a turning point. Cabinet offered its resignation last night, contradictory reports whether SCAF accepted it or not. Rumours say Baradei is negociating to form a governement. A call for a million people march has been made, today 4 PM. Last night, when I left Tahrir at dawn, I was impressed by the determination of the people fighting on Mohamed Mahmoud street. Met also a lot of people telling me they were against the protests till now, but have decided to return to Tahrir to "end the job". Also "not to leave the Place to one group only" (meaning the islamists)." (page Facebook)

- "Hors de Tahrir, la plupart des Egyptiens estiment que le SCAF a répondu aux demandes : l'accélération de la transition."

- "Deux noms ont circulé pour le nveau gouvernement : Baradei et A.M. Aboulfoutouh, dissident Frère Musulman, tendance réformatrice."

- "Résumons : en Egypte, auourd'huij, il n'y a ni président, ni parlement, ni constitution, ni gouvernement. Et en plus, ce matin, il fait froid."

- "So, in Egypt today, there's no more president, nor constitution, nor parliament, nor governement. And this morning, it's cold."

 

Source : https://twitter.com/#!/ClaudeGuibal

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Tantawi speech ruffles Tahrir

Tantawi speech ruffles Tahrir | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Less than two hours after the speech by Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, clashes have erupted again on Mohamed Mahmoud Street, a sign that activists and politician say indicates that the nation’s military rulers are following the former regime’s failed strategy to remain in power.é

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Egyptian civil unrest to escalate despite military's efforts

Egyptian civil unrest to escalate despite military's efforts | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The showdown between Egyptian street demonstrators and the military-led government will likely escalate in the countdown to next week's parliamentary elections despite the military council's pledge Tuesday to speed up the transition to civilian rule, analysts said. The impasse bears upon how angry protesters - gathered once again in Cairo's Tahrir Square as they were during the revolution earlier this year - are demanding that the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) withdraw immediately from power, analysts said. (...)

Analysts credited the council's Field Marshall Mohamed Hussein Tantawi with making a politically savvy maneuver Tuesday when he suggested a national referendum could be held on whether the military-led government should surrender power immediately."  (Michael Martinez, CNN)

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The portrait of a revolutionary from Cairo’s Tahrir Square

The portrait of a revolutionary from Cairo’s Tahrir Square | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Tear gas rained down across the streets, jam-packed with civilian protesters. Buckshots were fired with stinger ammunition, aimed towards their feet. Protesters would tuck tail for a brief moment out of fear of being hurt or killed by their adversaries. This is the typical scene for countless protesters like Mostafa Nasr, a 21-year-old graduate of Political Science from the American University in Cairo, who have taken to Cairo’s Tahrir Square to demand the fall of the interim military government. (...)

"The reason I am here fighting is because I want to put a stop to military rule and dictatorship, which has been ongoing in Egypt since the 1950’s.” (Luiz Sanchez/Bikya Masr)

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The Muslim Brothers are left behind, again

"I often think the Brothers' biggest problem is not that they are fundamentalist, or out of touch with the Egyptian mainstream, or too radical. It's that they are perceived, rightly, as schemers by average people. It's true of their leaders, at least, and it's what has made so many bright young people leave them in recent years and so many others doubt their intentions." (Issandr El-Amrani/The Arabist)

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