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Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Blogger Maikel Nabil released after 10 months in detention

Blogger Maikel Nabil released after 10 months in detention | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The 10-month detention of blogger Maikel Nabil came to an end on Saturday after Egypt’s de facto ruler Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi ordered the release of 1959 prisoners who were convicted by military courts.Nabil was arrested in March on charges of insulting the military after writing a blog post entitled “The army and the people were never one hand”, one month after the military junta assumed power following the ouster of autocratic leader Hosni Mubarak.

He was initially sentenced to three years in prison but the verdict was later trimmed to two years following a retrial.

Nabil went on hunger strike in August 2011 in protest at his imprisonment by the army, consuming only juice and milk. This escalated on 18 December as he refused all forms of nourishment before neding his strike on 31 December." (Hatem Maher)

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"Egypt's revolutionaries take the propaganda war into their own hands"

A new multimedia campaign is taking place across Egypt.

Frustrated with the biased coverage in state run media, activists are taking matters into their own hands by screening the videos that the Military Council do not want to be seen.

The decentralised 'Kazeboon' (Liars) movement involves ordinary people going downloading videos of military abuses and showing them in the streets of their own neighbourhoods.

The screenings often turn into protest marches, and are regularly attacked by those who oppose the movement.

 

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Islamists win 70% of Egypt People's Assembly party list seats

Islamists win 70% of Egypt People's Assembly party list seats | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The Supreme Electoral Commission announced Saturday the overall make-up of the party list seats in Egypt's upcoming People's Assembly.

As widely expected, the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) won the lion’s share with just over 38 per cent of the seats.

The Salafist Nour Party also continued the trend from the independent candidate voting to come second and secure 29 per cent of the list seats.

The moderate Islamist Al-Wasat party secured 3 per cent of the list seats.

As a whole, the Islamist forces account for 70 per cent of the Assembly.

The Wafd Party were the most successful of the non-Islamist forces, winning 36 seats, or around 11 per cent. The Egyptian Bloc coalition ended up with 33 seats, close to 10 per cent.

Trailing further behind, the Revolution Continues electoral coalition secured 2 per cent of the list seats.

The Free Egyptians, the leading party of the Egyptian Bloc, was unexpectedly among the parties that failed to achieve the minimum proportion of seats – 0.5 per cent – in order to be conferred with independent representation in Parliament. Al-Ghad Party and the Democratic Front did also not meet the threshold.

Meanwhile, the offshoots of the now-dismantled and once ruling National Democratic Party (NDP) secured, in total, 4 per cent of the list seats.

Results for the individual seats were announced at the end of each of the three voting stages, which began on 28 November.

Party list seats make up 332 of the Lower House's 498 elected seats. Ten further representatives are appointed by the president, in this case the military council." (Sherif Tarek/Ahram Online)

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Al-Azhar : "Nous souhaitons que la Constitution se fonde sur la citoyenneté"

Al-Azhar : "Nous souhaitons que la Constitution se fonde sur la citoyenneté" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Il y a beaucoup de malentendus sur la question (la charia, la loi islamique) et al-Azhar entend les dissiper. Il faut savoir que, dans la Constitution actuelle, la charia n'est appliquée que dans la sphère de la vie personnelle : mariage, divorce et héritage. Nous n'avons pas une Constitution islamique comme en Iran ou en Arabie saoudite. En Égypte, nous avons un droit et des tribunaux civils. On ne coupe pas la main des voleurs et on ne lapide pas les femmes. Il faut également garder à l'esprit que la charia ne concerne que les musulmans. Les chrétiens appliquent leurs propres coutumes. Pour la première fois dans l'histoire moderne de l'Égypte, tous les courants - les candidats à la présidence, les chefs de partis musulmans et chrétiens, les nassériens et les salafistes - ont signé le document. (...)

... les mêmes acteurs ont élaboré un manifeste intitulé "Les quatre libertés fondamentales : liberté de la croyance, liberté de l'opinion et de l'expression, liberté de la recherche scientifique, liberté de la création". La semaine prochaine, nous nous réunirons pour aborder la question du rôle de la femme dans la nouvelle Égypte." (Dr Mahmoud Hazab, conseiller auprès du Cheikh Ahmed al-Tayeb, l'imam d'al-Azhar, interviewé par Fatiha Temmiouri/Le Point)

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A Palestinian journalist wins first prize in cultural heritage photo competition

A Palestinian journalist wins first prize in cultural heritage photo competition | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It’s a night pilgrimage, and as the faithful go down the stairs, children light candles on the steps of Saint Mary’s Church in Jerusalem. This mysterious and shadowy atmosphere is caught in a moving frame by a young Palestinian photo-journalist, Mahmoud Illean, from Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2011 edition of “Crossing viewpoints: Mediterranean cities as spaces of socialisation” International Photography Award organised by the EU-funded Euromed Heritage programme and the Rehabimed Association.
“The photo is perfectly balanced and composed, both in terms of light and colors, and it drives the viewer with great sensitivity and dynamism to the main characters, the boy, the baby girl, the father…” says one member of the Jury Committee, architect Christophe Graz. “We have selected this picture because of its aesthetic and artistic value and because of its relevance to the theme. It is a rich composition of people in ritual ,“ says Christiane Dabdoub Nasser, another member of the Jury and team leader of Euromed Heritage Supporting Unit.
The theme of this award was “Mediterranean cities as spaces of socialisation” : the idea was to collect images from Mediterranean towns and cities, which are dynamic, living places that bring together different cultures, generations and types of people. In fact the people going down the stairway in Saint Mary’s Church are not of one faith; the holy place appears as shared by both Christians and Muslims: through the winning picture Jerusalem re-emerges as a place that should be shared by all. In fact, most of the entries to the competition reflect this diversity, and celebrate life in its varied social forms, from market squares to courtyards, from public fountains to churches.
The photo competition has once more highlighted the place that cultural heritage holds in Mediterranean contemporary societies, especially for the youth who have massively participated at the competition: the jury has received 266 pictures from 23 different countries. The country with the highest number of participants is Algeria, followed by Morocco and France. In total, 63% of all participants are originally from the Mediterranean partner’s countries.
The Jury has given a special mention to Mohamed Karim Boumais, a 29 year old Moroccan photographer, to Olivier Dubuquoy , a freelancer from Marseilles, to Mohamed Badarne, from Haifa, and to Emanuele Ciccomartine, a photographer from Spain. The winner Mahmoud Illean will be invited to the official inauguration of the exhibition “Crossing viewpoints: Mediterranean cities as spaces of socialisation”, to be held in Cairo in October 2012. (communiqué de presse)

 

http://www.euromedheritage.net/index.cfm?menuID=13

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Farmers Struggle to Reap the Harvest of Revolution

Farmers Struggle to Reap the Harvest of Revolution | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Almost one year after the revolution, Egyptian farmers still suffer from the effects of bad planning, exploitation, marginalization and corruption. But they are now more organized and ready to stand up for their rights. (...)

“We farmers are the backbone of the Egyptian state,” Haggag said. “But for years we have suffered the effects of corruption and bad planning. That is not only detrimental to us: it is against the interests of all Egyptians.”

Among the issues affecting Haggag and millions of other small farmers were a shortage of state-subsidized fertilizers, which were often resold on the black market at high prices.

“While factories sell 50kg of fertilizer to the state at LE30 ($4.97), we end up paying at least LE150 ($24.85) for the same amount,” said Haggag. “That is because the system is endemically corrupt.” (...)

Another chronic problem described by Haggag was the lack of clean water, including state failure to fulfil its responsibility to do annual maintenance work on irrigation channels.

“We have to pay for the cleaning and maintenance ourselves, even though this should be covered by our 60LE ($9.94) annual irrigation tax,” said Haggag. (...)

Abdel Ghani added that he believed the revolution had gone some way in restoring dignity for Egypt’s rural inhabitants, but that they had yet to see real change happen. “Democracy is not a theory,” he said. “Either we see its benefits on the ground, or we will simply need to keep pushing.”

Meanwhile, corruption at the local level meant that “we need a major clean-up of all institutions, not just higher government,” said Haggag. “So long as local government and cooperative employees continue to divert funds, and so long as we are unable to organize into efficient, independent unions, we will remain marginalized.” (Serene Assir)

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Tahrir Imam condemns Egypt media for tarnishing revolution's image

Tahrir Imam condemns Egypt media for tarnishing revolution's image | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The “Tahrir Preacher” Sheikh Mazhar Shaheen, in his Friday sermon in Omar Makram Mosque today in Tahrir Square, condemned Egyptian media for destroying the image of the revolution.Shaheen, the Imam of the landmark mosque, which is adjacent to the square and regularly serves as a makeshift hospital when protesters are attacked in Tahrir during the interval protests this year, said that the media has spread rumours that the mosque is a place of prostitution, drugs and torture.

Shaheen noted that the media is ignoring all the major political issues currently plaguing the country, like the death of protesters in recent clashes and focused, instead, on the burning of the Scientific Institute, which was torched during clashes in front of the Cabinet building in December." (Ahram Online)

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Egypt's Brotherhood Warns Military

Egypt's Brotherhood Warns Military | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, the powerful group that is expected to gain new clout following recent parliamentary polls, signaled for the first time that it would confront the military in the country's transition to civilian power.

Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie said the incoming Parliament will scrutinize the military's budget and hold the army accountable for mistakes made during the transition, setting the stage for a possible confrontation with a military leadership that has sought to protect its political privileges.

"We respect and appreciate the army but the military council must be held accountable for any mistakes," Mr. Badie said. "No one is above accountability." (Matt Bradley)

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International Congress to be Held in Alexandria in 2013

International Congress to be Held in Alexandria in 2013 | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Last year, the changes in Egypt made it impossible for the Egyptian organizers to continue their plans for the International Congress of Egyptologists that had been scheduled for September 2012 in Cairo. As a result, the IAE asked member organizations for bids to host the next Congress elsewhere, which we had planned to post on the IAE website this month so that all IAE members could vote on them. We have received a large number of such bids, and are all very grateful for the vision and initiative of the IAE members and member organizations who submitted them.

In the last few months, however, our Egyptian colleagues have come forward with a proposal to host the next Congress at the Calligraphy Center in Alexandria. As you may recall, this was actually the proposal first discussed at the 2008 ICE in Rhodes, before the Egyptian authorities changed the venue to Cairo. The officers of the IAE have discussed this new proposal in detail with our Egyptian counterparts, and we are agreed that we should accept it on behalf of the IAE. We have reached this decision primarily for two reasons. First, we feel a sense of commitment to our Egyptian colleagues because of the agreement reached in 2008 to hold the Congress in Egypt and because it has been the tradition to award the Congress to Egypt if they request it. Second, we feel it is important for the IAE to show its support for the efforts of our Egyptian colleagues to continue academic work after the disruptions of last year. In this, we believe that we reflect the feelings of all Egyptologists.

The next Congress will be held at the Calligraphy Center in Alexandria, under the direction of Ahmed Mansour, Deputy Director of the Center. The schedule has been set preliminarily for Friday, September 13, to Friday, September 20. All announcements, news, and details regarding the Congress will be posted on this website as we receive them. In addition, the Calligraphy Center is preparing its own website devoted to the Congress.

We extend our thanks and best wishes to our Egyptian hosts, and urge all IAE members to plan on attending. The IAE will cooperate in every way possible to ensure that ICE 2013 is a success."

See you in Alex!

James P. Allen, President, IAE
Laure Pantalacci, Vice-President, IAE
Ursula Verhoeven-van Elsbergen, General Secretary, IAE

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Tahrir Square: Where people make history

Tahrir Square: Where people make history | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The square, the epicentre of the January 25 Revolution, witnessed the ebb of flow of post-Mubarak Egypt throughout the year. Initially the focus of millions chanting for the fall of the Mubarak regime, and later the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Tahrir witnessed violent crackdowns, celebrations, funerals and even weddings.

From the first day of the revolution, the square was a magnet that pulled in revolutionaries — a target they were aiming to reach, no matter where the protest started. But the significance that pulled revolutionaries to this central point in Cairo goes a long way back in history.

Tahrir Square, one of the most famous in Egypt, has witnessed political struggle since the 1919 Revolution and was a focal point in many demonstrations and popular uprisings.

The area, which originally was a mix of sand and swamp, became one of the most vibrant parts of the city. It was planned to emulate the design of Charles de Gaulle Square in Paris and was constructed in 1865 under Khedive Ismail." (Menatallah Abrahim)

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Letter from Cairo : Do you speak Baradei?

Letter from Cairo : Do you speak Baradei? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Mohamed al-Baradei is the doyen of the most endangered species of languages not only because very few are able to understand it, but also because very many are keen to install the kind of subtitles that relegate it to the position of its rival tongues. He is, in fact, this rare language with all the values that make up its nouns and the magnanimity that inform its verbs.

Anyone who listens carefully and objectively to the statement in which he announced his decision not to run for president would detect the characteristics that distinguish the Baradei language, as subtle as it is, from others, as loud as they are. It is very hard to miss this single component that dominates his discourse and which he himself mentions as the reason for his withdrawal from what he rightly sees as poorly-directed charade: dialogue with the conscience. (...)

The Baradei language is by no means elitist as many who are unable to fathom it claim as they look for an excuse for neither understanding it nor even attempting to listen to it let alone learn about its rules. It is only as far-fetched as any altruistic action in the midst of a ruthless fight for as many morsels of the cake as one can get and it too human to be grasped by those who value parliament seats more than they do flesh and blood." (Sonia Farid)

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"All'ombra della dea del sicomoro", di Sivana Cincotti e Andrea Ghisolfi

"All'ombra della dea del sicomoro", di Sivana Cincotti e Andrea Ghisolfi | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Ananke, 2012, 196 p.

 

"Primo libro in lingua italiana dedicato ai giardini dell’antico Egitto, il testo nasce dalle diverse competenze dei due autori che, avvalendosi di un approccio interdisciplinare, affrontano in modo puntuale le fonti iconografiche, archeologiche e filologiche.

Ad una prima parte introduttiva, fa seguito una divisione in macro argomenti riferiti alle tipologie architettoniche fondamentali: il tempio, la tomba, il giardino d’uso e i giardini legati alle residenze. Ogni singolo aspetto è analizzato e legato alle entità botaniche più ricorrenti non solo da un punto di vista pratico ma anche simbolico. Dallo studio emerge infatti che quella faraonica, società agraria per eccellenza, destinava al giardino un ruolo fondamentale perchè costituiva un mondo ordinato e rassicurante, un piacevole rifugio a garanzia di benessere e sussistenza.

Nel corso del testo rimane costante il richiamo alla lingua egizia con corrispondenze ai geroglifici e alla trattazione strettamente egittologica sono legati gli ultimi due capitoli dedicati all’influenza della cultura egizia nell’evoluzione dell’idea del giardino: i giardini egizi in epoca romana e i capricci egittizzanti.

Il testo è corredato di rilievi iconografici, planimetrie, disegni e di suggestivi scatti fotografici che testimoniano l’immutata bellezza del paesaggio nilotico." (présentation de l'éditeur)

Prezzo: 17,50 €

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Seeking Consensus, the FJP Remains Wary of Alliance with Salafis

"Despite widespread speculation to the contrary, the Muslim Brotherhood's political wing -- the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) -- has consistently ruled outthe possibility of forming any strategic alliance with the Salafist Nour Party. Although the two parties have been indiscriminately – and incorrectly -- lumped together as "Islamists" by some observers, the FJP has been keen on maintaining its distinctly moderate outlook by focusing on nationalist alliances instead of ideology-based ones and prioritizing public policy over religious agendas.

The Muslim Brotherhood, much like other parties, was caught off guard by the Salafis electoral gains in the latest People's Assembly elections. With almost a quarter of the seats, the Nour Party came in second to the FJP, and the former’s leader has been nominated for the influential post of deputy speaker of the People’s Assembly, scheduled to convene for its first session on January 23.

A challenge for the FJP now is to maintain its inclusive policy toward other parties without falling into the trap of ideological polarization, and without excluding the Salafis either. The FJP’s track record throughout the transitional phase has proven that it is not seeking strategic alliances with the Salafis nor with other Islamist parties per se, but rather cross-ideological coalitions that can achieve "consensus." The FJP’s commitment to coalition-building gave rise to the Democratic Alliance for Egypt (DAE) in the months following the ousting of Hosni Mubarak, a coalition that started with 13 parties from across the political spectrum aimed at uniting diverse parties around a common political agenda. The DAE was later converted into a powerful electoral coalition which garnered 47 percent of the seats in PA elections. As the only non-ideological coalition competing in the last elections, the DAE offered a middle-of-the road alternative between the secular-dominated Egyptian Bloc, and the Salafi coalition led by Nour Party.

Furthermore, the FJP sought to allay fears of an "Islamist Government" by insisting on its intention to form a coalition government. This would be based on the 11 parties currently in the DAE together with other parties and independents expected to join FJP's coalition from outside the alliance. This indicates that FJP still abides by MB's old—yet still valid—motto "Participation rather than Domination." Based on the same logic behind the traditional slogan, the FJP has stated that it will not field a presidential candidate affiliated with the Brotherhood." (Ikhwan Web)

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Egyptian blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad to be released

Egyptian blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad to be released | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Jailed Egyptian blogger Maikel Nabil is set to be released, along with 1,959 other jailed Egyptian civilians, according to a report from Egypt’s state-run Al-Ahram newspaper.The Egyptian government has received fierce criticism domestically and abroad for their detention and sentencing of Nabil, who was sentenced for comments he made in a blog post entitled “The Army and the people are not one hand.”

On April 10, in a case widely seen as the first of its kind in the post-Hosni Mubarak Egypt, Nabil was sentenced to three years in jail by a military court.

The young blogger spent most of his time in jail on a prison hunger strike to protest of his treatment in Egypt’s judicial and prison systems." (Sarah Sheffer)

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Egypte: un an après, trop tôt pour fêter la révolution, selon des militants

Egypte: un an après, trop tôt pour fêter la révolution, selon des militants | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Les militants pro-démocratie égyptiens accusent le pouvoir militaire de vouloir récupérer à son profit le premier anniversaire, le 25 janvier, du début de la révolte qui a poussé Hosni Moubarak au départ, estimant que la révolution reste encore à faire.
Face au Conseil suprême des forces armées (CSFA) qui prépare pour le 25 janvier, promu "journée de la révolution", des célébrations en grande pompe avec feux d'artifice et défilés, les mouvements de jeunes qui ont lancé la révolte prévoient manifestations et appels au départ des généraux.
"La fête de la révolution n'aura lieu que quand le pouvoir aura été totalement transféré à des instances civiles élues", affirme le groupe "Nous sommes tous Khaled Saïd", du nom d'un jeune d'Alexandrie dont la mort lors d'une arrestation policière avait contribué à mobiliser contre le régime.
"Si nous devons célébrer quelque chose, ce sera la poursuite de notre révolution", estime le groupe créé notamment par le cyber-militant Waël Ghonim en 2010." (AFP, via Le Parisien)

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Egypte: les islamistes remportent plus des deux tiers des sièges de députés - LExpress.fr

Egypte: les islamistes remportent plus des deux tiers des sièges de députés - LExpress.fr | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Les islamistes égyptiens ont remporté plus de deux tiers des sièges de députés, dont près de la moitié pour les seuls Frères musulmans, selon les résultats officiels de la première élection depuis la chute du président Hosni Moubarak diffusés samedi.
Le parti de la liberté et de la justice (PLJ), issu des Frères musulmans, se taille la part du lion avec 235 sièges sur les 498 en lice, soit 47% environ, lors de ce scrutin qui s'est tenu en plusieurs phases depuis le 28 novembre.
Le parti fondamentaliste salafiste Al-Nour arrive en deuxième position, avec 121 sièges (environ 24%).
Le parti libéral Wafd a eu quelque 9% des sièges. Le Bloc égyptien, coalition de partis libéraux laïcs, obtient 7% des députés dans cette élection considérée comme la plus ouverte depuis le renversement de la monarchie en 1952." (L'Express)

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The problem with Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood is not sharia

The problem with Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood is not sharia | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Secularism is not my cause and sharia is not my fear but I am one of those Egyptians who are critical of the Muslim Brotherhood movement – one who made a point of not voting for the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice party in the recent elections.

My cause is Egypt, the revolution, and seeing my country become a true democracy. My fear is the prolongation of military rule, of transformation to a system that gives the military special status above civil institutions, or one that grants the army and its budget immunity against parliamentary accountability.

The Brotherhood's priorities are different from mine, and their objectives have occasionally conflicted with those of the revolutionaries. (...)

In their pursuit of "stability", the Brothers have occasionally sided with the ruling military council – the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Scaf) – in defiance of the demands from Tahrir and other squares in Egypt. They say stability will benefit the revolution, and holding elections will lead to peaceful transition of power to civilians.

But revolutionaries disagree, on the grounds that the regime's remnants – many of whom are still in power across the hierarchies of governmental bodies (including the army and Scaf) – will not relinquish their power easily and peacefully. Elections are not a magical solution when it comes to making powerful, corrupt figures let go of advantages they have enjoyed for decades and instead face justice." (Sara Khorshid)

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Egypt Islamists say military will not escape scrutiny

Egypt Islamists say military will not escape scrutiny | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The head of the Muslim Brotherhood, set to be the biggest party in Egypt’s new freely elected parliament, said on Friday interim military rulers would be held accountable after handing power to civilians for any mistakes made during their time at the helm.

The military budget will also be subject to parliamentary oversight, the Brotherhood’s general guide, Mohammed Badie, said in an interview with private Egyptian channel Dream TV, three days before the first session of parliament’s lower house.

The military council, which took over from Hosni Mubarak last February after the president of 30 years was ousted during 18 days of popular protests, has promised to relinquish power to civilian officials once presidential elections are completed in June. But activists fear it is actually working behind the scenes to maintain sway over Egyptian politics.

Some analysts have suggested the military will not fully abandon politics unless the Muslim Brotherhood and other prominent political parties offer guarantees that it will not face legal retribution over the killing of protesters." (Reuters, via al Arabiya News)

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Activist who lost eyes named spokesperson of the revolution

Activist who lost eyes named spokesperson of the revolution | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Blind revolutionary Ahmed Harara has been named the spokesperson of the revolution by Tahrir activists on Friday.The activists, who were participating in the Friday of Martyr's Dream rally in Tahrir Square to prepare for the first anniversary of the January 25 revolution, decided that they will create an advisory council made up of 50 revolutionary youth, topped by Harara to represent the group.

Harara, a 31-year-old dentist, became an iconic figure of the revolution after he lost both eyes in two separate clashes since the revolution erupted in January 2011." (Ahram Online)

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Egyptian anarchists seek self-governed society

Egyptian anarchists seek self-governed society | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"They do not believe in governments, they boycotted the elections, they demand “direct democracy” and they’re associated with chaos and have been targeted by the military and some Islamists.Egypt’s anarchists are anticipating a crackdown before the first anniversary of the January 25 uprising. They are perceived as seeking chaos; villains who want to bring down the state, defy authority and spread lawlessness.

The word ‘anarchy’ in Greek means "no authority." Anarchists’ central belief is that “no man is good enough to be another man’s master,” and that “good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws.”

Anarchy became the new bogeyman — a place once reserved to the Muslim Brotherhood under the Mubarak regime. Many believe that this ideology is dangerous to Egypt.

“Egypt, the homeland, is not the same as the system or the state or the government. The people called for the overthrow of the regime and this means to bring the current system or the state down, as it happened before with the Abbasids, Ayyubids, Ottomans and others whose state was overthrown, but Egypt was not harmed,” said self-proclaimed anarchist Yasser Abdel Kawy, an artist, photographer and graphic designer." (Hanan Solayman /Special to Daily News Egypt)

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Some news from Zahi Hawass

Some news from Zahi Hawass | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"For the last few months, I have been busy writing and working hard, as I am used to doing. I am at my private office 7 days a week working on various projects. Actually, being away from government has been god for me. I needed time to recover from all the trouble, and to give the friends of Seth, the god of chaos, some time to calm down. I have been staying very busy giving public lectures. One recent talk was at the Mena House hotel for an American group, and another one for 60 Australians was at a resort in Sahl-Hasheesh, Hurghada. I really enjoyed the two days that I spent at this beautiful seaside resort, and the wonderful people I met there. I even agreed to travel to Australia and New Zealand at the end of May to give some public lectures. I believe that this tour will be a great opportunity to promote tourism in Egypt. (...)

I feel that it is very important that I take every opportunity to remind members of the press that in spite of what people around the world hear daily about trouble in Egypt, guests who come here to see our ancient monuments have stayed safe. All the tourists that I have met have enjoyed their time in Egypt since the Revolution. We need tourists to come back in even greater numbers for the sake of our economy, and also for the sake of our antiquities – all the ongoing restoration and other projects that we are undertaking require money. Because of the way the government budget has worked for many years, this money has really come from only two sources-tourists and exhibits outside of Egypt. (...)

In addition to giving talks, I have been writing a great deal – something that I love doing very much. I have written a new book about Tutankhamun which will be published in Japanese, and later will be published for the iPad.
My book on antiquities and the 2011 Revolution is almost finished. I have just finished chapter 13, and I still need to write two more chapters. These two chapters will be the most important ones in the book. I will publish this book first in English, and then in Arabic. At the same time, I am working on a few scientific articles."

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Egyptologists still digging up past, even with uncertain future

Egyptologists still digging up past, even with uncertain future | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"The Egyptian Revolution that began a year ago continues to create instability in a country rich with antiquity. But most Egyptologists say it’s business as usual, even with the recent return of protestors to Tahrir Square in Cairo.

“The impact has been very minor,” said Emily Teeter, an Egyptologist and research associate at the Oriental Institute, a research center and archaeology museum at the University of Chicago. Teeter, also a representative to the Chicago chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt, was in Egypt as recently as last November. “The biggest disruption has been bureaucratic. Permissions were disrupted because committees weren’t meeting. Basically trying to do advanced planning was very hard,” she said. (...)

“Obviously the political turmoil is happening, and you don’t know exactly what’s going to happen,” Scott said. “But at the moment we feel fairly confident.”

Most archaeological work occurs not in the major cities, but in less populated places such as Luxor, the site of former Egyptian capital Thebes, where the University of Chicago has a permanent headquarters. Although Luxor was undisrupted, various institutions did send home students as a precaution." (David B. Nelson)

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Opérations vérité sur les "kâziboun" (menteurs) - 2e partie

Opérations vérité sur les "kâziboun" (menteurs) - 2e partie | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
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"Les animaux en Egypte ancienne" (France inter)

"Les animaux en Egypte ancienne" (France inter) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"Hérodote et les Grecs marquaient de l'étonnement. Les Romains multipliaient les sarcasmes : des villes entières qui vénèrent les chats, les poissons, ces dévots du Nil sont des fous ! Plus tard, les Pères de l'Eglise s'indignèrent... Le rapport des Egyptiens aux animaux, longtemps, parut inouï.

Mais, voilà qu'aujourd'hui, on débat de plus en plus de la barrière des espèces. Où placer la frontière entre l'animal et l'humain ? Y a t-il vraiment un propre de l'homme ? En la matière, l'observation des positions, assez extraordinaires, des Egyptiens, n'est pas inutile. Chez eux, l'animal et l'humain s'entremêlaient, de la même manière que l'imaginaire et le quotidien. Les Egyptiens ne posaient pas comme nous une frontière entre nature et culture. Dans l'histoire des grandes civilisations, ils font vraiment figure d'animaux singuliers puisqu'ils ne considéraient pas l'homme comme un animal "spécial"..."

(émission "La marche de l'histoire" - France inter - présentée par Jean Lebrun)

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In Egypt's New Parliament, Women Will Be Scarce

In Egypt's New Parliament, Women Will Be Scarce | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

"In Egypt's recent parliamentary elections, the first since Hosni Mubarak's ouster and the fairest in the country's history, Islamists won big.

And one group suffered a shocking disappointment — women.

Although the final numbers haven't been announced, it appears there will be only about eight women out of the 508 seats — or fewer than 2 percent.

"I think it's a disastrous Parliament; how this can represent a society?" said Dalia Abdel Hamid, the gender officer at the Egyptian Initiative for Human Rights. "After the revolution everyone wanted to be represented and to have their voices heard but ... women are just being marginalized by all the parties."

It's been almost a year since Egypt's revolution, and there's a feeling now that the heady days when men and women stood together in Cairo's Tahrir Square are long gone." (Lourdes Garcia-Navarro)

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