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Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Claim that Abu Hamed sought to overthrow regime to be investigated

Claim that Abu Hamed sought to overthrow regime to be investigated | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

General Prosecutor Judge Abdel Meguid Mahmoud referred a claim accusing former MP Mohamed Abu Hamed of “calling for overthrowing the regime, receiving funds from a businessman and inciting Copts to protest against legitimacy.”

The plaintiff, a man named Mahmoud Abdel Rahman, stated in his accusation that while he was watching a show on a religious satellite channel, the TV presenter received a call from political and human rights activist Mohamed Othman where the latter said he had “information that show Abu Hamed received funds to cause sectarian sedition and overthrow the regime.”

The activist said that Abu Hamed received these funds when he was in Lebanon and met with Lebanese politician Samir Geagea, Abdel Rahman said.

Abu Hamed also received financial support from a businessman to set the Egyptian people against the elected regime, Abdel Rahman added.

The plaintiff also stated that in an interview with an international television network which he did not name Abu Hamed said that an American official asked him to “mobilize no less than 100 thousand citizens for a sit-in in front of the presidential palace and vital areas … in order to topple president-elect Mohamed Mursi.” (Aswat Masriya)

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New constitution draft proposals: President and parliament can send ministers to trial

New constitution draft proposals: President and parliament can send ministers to trial | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Political System Committee of the Constituent Assembly tasked with writing Egypt's new constitution has proposed two noteworthy articles: one that gives the president, parliament and prosecutor-general the right to send the prime minister and other ministers to trial if they violate the law while in office; the second establishing that government officials accused must relinquish their posts until their case is closed. If a minister choses to resign, or if his or her tenure is over, this would not close any pending legal case.

The first article proposes that for parliament to send a cabinet official to trial at least five members of parliament should propose the accusation and at least one-third of parliament should approve the accusation.

The constitution drafting Constituent Assembly is divided into groups, each with a different specialisation. The Political System Committee is one subgroup.

Earlier, Prime Minister Hisham Kandil revealed that a draft of the country's new constitution will be ready for approval by a nationwide referendum by the end of September, according to a report of the state-run MENA news agency.

The Constituent Assembly is yet to announce a date for the completion of the draft. Kandil does not officially represent the drafting body.

The assembly remains at risk of dissolution, however, pending a court ruling slated for September. The constitutionality of the Constituent Assembly has been brought into question, because it was appointed by Egypt's parliament, whose lower house — the People's Assembly — was dissolved on the basis of a ruling by the High Constitutional Court that declared the law that regulated 2011's November parliamentary elections unconstitutional.

If the Constituent Assembly is found unconstitutional and dissolved, Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi will be entitled to form a new body to draft the charter. (Al-Ahram, via Aswat Masriya)

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MP: Mursi's Visit to Iran Shows Egypt's Independence from US, Israeli Policies

MP: Mursi's Visit to Iran Shows Egypt's Independence from US, Israeli Policies | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The upcoming visit to Tehran by Egyptian President Mohammad Mursi indicates Cairo's independence from the US and Israeli policies, a senior member of the Egyptian parliament stressed on Sunday.

"Mursi's presence in Tehran conveys this message to the US and Israel that the era of Egypt's political obedience to Washington and Tel Aviv has ended," Sabri Amer told FNA.

"During Hosni Mubarak's leadership all the decisions and policies in both areas of domestic and foreign policy were made through coordination with the US and the Zionist regime, but the conditions have now changed in Egypt and the era of the ruling of the Egyptian regimes which were allies and loyal to the West has ended," he added.

Spokesman of Egypt's Presidential Office Yasser Ali on Friday confirmed President Mursi's visit to Tehran next week, saying that the Egyptian president plans to discuss ties and regional issues with Iranian officials.

Ali said Mursi will visit Iran to take part in the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) summit on August 30, adding that he also plans to discuss bilateral ties and exchange views over regional issues, specially Syria, in meetings with senior Iranian officials, including President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

What matters in this visit is cooperation and communication, he said in a statement published by the London-based Asharq al-Awsat newspaper.

The discussions between the Egyptian and Iranian presidents will target the overall situation in the region and methods of cooperation as well as prospects of cooperation in the Syrian issue since "Iran is a major player in this issue", Ali stated.

The upcoming visit to Iran by the newly-elected president of post-revolution Egypt is seen as a landmark event which analysts expect to serve as a cornerstone of rapid and expansive changes not just in the two countries' ties, but in regional equations.

The Egyptian president is due to first visit China and then arrive in Tehran to attend the NAM summit meeting in the Iranian capital on August 20 and 30.

NAM is comprised of some 120 member states and 17 observer countries.

Egypt is currently head of the Non-Aligned Movement, founded to advocate the causes of the developing world, and is set to hand it over to Iran in the Tehran meeting.

Mursi's visit will be the first by an Egyptian head of state to Tehran since the Islamic Revolution in 1979.

In Tehran, officials have welcomed Mursi's visit as an event which could be a milestone in ties between the two Muslim world kingpins.

Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani welcomed Mursi's participation in the NAM summit, stressing Iran and Egypt's importance as two big Muslim states.

Larijani noted that the presence of Mursi in the upcoming meeting is very useful and beneficial.

"Since long time ago, Egypt and Iran as two big Muslim countries have had close ties and played key roles in the Islamic civilization," he added.

Also earlier this month, President of the Middle-East Center for Regional and Strategic Studies Mustafa al-Labad pointed to Iran's invitation to the Egyptian president to visit Tehran to attend the NAM meeting, and said the visit will be "very sensitive".

"In fact, the visit will be very important and sensitive after the present political changes and developments. Iran and Egypt are two great regional countries with great and profound cultures and civilizations, and it is natural for them to consult with each other over regional conditions," Labad told FNA.

"We hope that Mohammad Mursi will melt down the freeze in the two countries' relations by giving a positive response to the invitation," the analyst said.

The visit will mean much, not just for Egypt and Iran, but for Iran's enemies, specially the US which has rushed to voice its strong opposition to the world states' participation in the NAM meeting in Tehran.

Since Egypt's Hosni Mubarak was toppled last year, Egypt and Iran have signaled interest in renewing ties severed after Iran's Islamic Revolution and Egypt's recognition of Israel, when relations between the two broke down.

Earlier this year, Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi officially invited his then Egyptian counterpart, Nabil Al-Arabi, to pay a visit to Tehran. Later, the Iranian foreign minister and his former Egyptian counterpart also held a meeting in Bali, Indonesia.

During the meeting which took place on the sidelines of a ministerial meeting of the NAM, the two diplomats conferred on ways to promote the bilateral relations between Tehran and Cairo, and stressed the need for continued consultations in this regard. (FARS news agency)

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Egyptians indifferent to American aid cut threat

EGYPT'S new leaders are lashing out at Israel and the United States, prompting Washington politicians to ask just what their $ 65 billion in aid has bought the United States. Since a 1979 peace treaty between Egypt and Israel, Washington has given Cairo economic and military aid that has exceeded $ 1.5 billion per year.

Congress believes that the funds help keep Egypt afloat, and that they should buy Washington some good will and gratitude. But the reality is that the military assistance is largely an economic lifeline for America's defense industry, which is the chief beneficiary of the aid program. And in a country where many are too young to remember the reasons behind the aid, generations have been reared to believe it is a sacrosanct privilege. As a result, American threats to cut aid ring hollow and attempts to link it to foreign policy objectives are futile.

Egypt is the second-largest recipient of foreign aid, after Israel. Of the $ 1.56 billion in aid the Obama administration asked Congress to approve for Egypt in 2012, only $ 250 million was earmarked for economic assistance. The lion's share of the request - $ 1.31 billion - was for military and security purposes. Almost all of that aid is allocated to Egyptian weapons purchases from American defense contractors, such as General Dynamics and Honeywell.

"In America the aid is seen as a gift to Egypt," Sayf Al-Yazl, a former general and director of the Jumhuriyya Center for Strategic Studies told The Media Line. "But Americans always forget that it is American defense companies that are the chief beneficiary of the aid. We only get to spend the money in your military supermarkets."

More than 30 years after Egypt signed a peace treaty with America's key ally, Israel, solidifying Washington's role as the region's major powerbroker, Egyptians feel underappreciated. They have watched as American aid has shrunk from $ 2.1 billion per year to less than $ 1.6 billion, even as the cash transfers have been eroded by inflation. As the Egyptian economy has grown by more than 300 percent, the added value of American assistance has shriveled considerably. And when Washington and Jerusalem signed an agreement in 2007 to increase Israel's aid by more than $ 600 million per year, Cairo was shut out of the party. "The aid itself is of much less importance than when it commenced in the wake of the Camp David Accords," notes Professor Robert Springborg of the Naval Postgraduate School.

At the same time, military officials here have never been pleased that Israel receives more technologically advanced weaponry than Egypt does. To entice Israel to sign a peace agreement, Washington promised to ensure Jerusalem would have a qualitative edge over Egypt. While Egypt's air force is packed with F-16 fighter planes, Israel has the more sophisticated F-15.
"The aid does not keep us on par with Israel," Karim Yahya, a journalist with Egypt's largest newspaper, Al-Ahram, told The Media Line. "Israel is the first priority for American policy, not Egypt."

Though Washington politicians perceive the assistance as a sign of American benevolence that should buy it some foreign policy influence, Egyptian leaders view it as an entitlement. "(Former) President (Hosni) Mubarak and military leaders view our military assistance" as "untouchable compensation" for making and maintaining peace with Israel," American Ambassador to Egypt Margaret Scobey wrote in a 2009 diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks.

This view is not confined to Egypt's officer class. "Many Egyptians view American aid as a right," Bashir Abd Al-Fatah, a researcher at the Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies told The Media Line.

Nevertheless, some Egyptians would like to dispense with the aid all together, believing that only a narrow clique of senior military officers benefit from it. These people point to American-funded projects such as the International Medical Center hospital facility as indicative of the corruption American aid has sown. Billed as an in-patient complex to treat soldiers, the military transformed it into a commercial enterprise that ministered to paying civilians. "Corrupt generals benefit from these projects," says Yahya. "The average Egyptian does not. There is a whole industry in this country that uses the aid to enrich some people while the population suffers."

As a result, American talk of reducing aid or even eliminating it does not scare Egyptians. "There is a big exaggeration about need for this aid. Who benefits?" asks Yahya. According to Ambassador Scobey' cable, Washington is at the front of the line. "The US military enjoys priority access to the Suez Canal and Egyptian airspace" in exchange for American assistance, she wrote. Others note how Cairo helps Washington in quiet ways even as it overtly criticizes America's regional initiatives. During the US occupation of Iraq, which Mubarak opposed, Cairo allowed American jets returning from Baghdad to refuel at Egyptian airbases.

In the wake of the Egyptian revolution, which has increased anti-American sentiment, think-tank analysts such as the Washington Institute for Near East Policy's Eric Trager and the Brookings Institution's Shadi Hamid have advocated eliminating the aid. But the view from shiny Washington office suites and marble houses in Qatar looks very different than from the squalid slums of Cairo. The principal loser of such a gambit would be America and its Egyptian friends.

Local analysts say Washington would lose its remaining leverage with the new Egyptian government headed by Muhammad Mursi. That could jeopardize the fiscal viability of its defense contractors who benefit from Cairo's military purchases and transform the US-Egyptian relationship into the litmus test by which post-Mubarak politicians are judged.
"Egyptians are still feeling their way around the revolution," Saeed Okasha, a researcher at the Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies said. "They still don't know what their views toward America are.

They genuinely like (President Barack) Obama. But if America starts to play with the aid, it will only backfire and place it on center stage." And with a new government beholden to its electorate rather than to Washington, any move to tamper with the aid could irreparably damage bilateral ties rather than coerce Egypt into line. (Menafn)

 

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L'Egypte ne rétablira pas ses relations avec l'Iran

L'Egypte n'a pas l'intention de rétablir ses relations diplomatiques avec l'Iran rompues depuis plus de 30 ans, rapporte hier la presse égyptienne, moins d'une semaine avant un voyage à Téhéran du président Mohamed Morsi à l'occasion d'un Sommet des pays Non-alignés.
La visite, la première d'un président égyptien à Téhéran depuis plus de 30 ans, sera «protocolaire» et «il n'est pas question pour le moment de rétablir les relations diplomatiques», a rapporté la presse égyptienne, citant une déclaration du porte-parole de la présidence Yasser Ali. Le quotidien gouvernemental Al-Ahram a indiqué que M.Morsi ne resterait à Téhéran que quatre heures, le temps de remettre la présidence du Mouvement des Non-alignés à l'Iran lors de ce sommet prévu les 30 et 31 août.
Selon le journal, le président égyptien, issu des Frères musulmans, s'arrêtera à Téhéran après une visite en Chine, pays qu'il a choisi pour sa première sortie internationale hors du monde arabe. Il sera accompagné lors de sa visite à Pékin d'une délégation composée de sept ministres et 70 hommes d'affaires.
Dans une interview publiée mardi par Al-Ahram, le ministre iranien des Affaires étrangères Ali Akbar Salehi avait estimé que son pays et l'Egypte s'acheminaient vers une reprise de leurs relations diplomatiques. (L'Expression)

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The 18th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists will be held in Helsinki, Finland 29 August - 1 September 2012.

The 18th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists will be held in Helsinki, Finland 29 August - 1 September 2012. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The meeting is organized by the University of Helsinki, the National Board of Antiquities, the Finnish Antiquarian Society in collaboration with the Archaeological Society of Finland, and the Universities of Oulu and Turku.

The meeting is funded by the Ministry of Education and Culture, the Finnish Cultural Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Swedish Cultural Foundation in Finland, the Oskar Öflund Foundation and the Finnish Society of Sciences and Letters - Societas Scientiarum Fennica.

 

Programme : http://www.eaa2012.fi/programme

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The media and sexual violence

Sexual violence or harassment, a highly visible phenomenon which has infected and spread within Egyptian society over the past ten years, is a complicated issue. Suggested reasons for this social disease have included sexual frustration, economic hardship, conservatism versus liberalism, and/or lack of law enforcement. Analysts may argue and disagree on all of the previous factors or involved age groups, but the role of the media seems to be one of the most dominant and influential in this equation.

This Eid (feast), while most Egyptians traditionally head out to public parks and shopping areas, many concerned activists took the initiative to act against sexual violence, organising a variety of anti-sexual violence activities. A tremendous amount of videos and pictures have been produced and circulated across social media outlets during the three days of Eid.

A very interesting observation can be made from the footage circulated. Many of the harassers were under 16, and most of the victims were very modestly dressed, with their heads covered. This observation does not necessarily conflict with the above-mentioned reasons for sexual harassment, but it adds a very important dimension as to why the crime is actually committed. It is (for the perpetrators) “fun” and “cool.” It is “entertaining” to touch a woman’s sensitive part, pretend it wasn’t you, and then make your friends laugh.

Since we are a society that adores jokes and making fun of everything in the middle of the most miserable situations, it seems that this phenomenon has found its place in society like a fire in dry hay. But, for God’s sake, what makes hurting another person cool? And how can such a disgusting crime be conceived as fun?

It is simply the media, I believe.

Let’s consider the movies of superstar-comedian Adel Imam and younger pop star/idol Tamer Hosny, who both filmed scenes in which they literally performed sexual violence against female strangers. These scenes were produced in comedic style, with the respective stars coming up with creative, hilarious quips and always ended up with the female falling for her harasser.

Adel Imam and Tamer Hosny are not the first or only stars involved in the production of such irresponsible “art.” Many others have found it an easy way to reach stardom through kitschy scenes or songs. However, these particular two superstars seem to be very influential and leading the trend.

Since the media is apparently a significant creator of people’s awareness and identity, sexual violence has found its way to people’s consciousness, and be(Maher Hamoud/come attractive to carry out in reality.

Those barely 16 year old children documented on videos and photographs over the past couple of days are living evidence proving that sexual violence has become pop-culture in Egypt. Through cheap, irresponsible media and other factors, the problem has been exacerbated. Yet through socially responsible media, this social disease could be treated.

Art might be the mirror of society. But think twice before you create a monster from your imagination that later becomes real, and reflects the whole of society on the same mirror. It is just a matter of ethics verses cheap money making. (Maher Hamoud/Daily News Egypt)

 

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The Second Egyptian Republic

The Second Egyptian Republic | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian and international observers like to speculate about what the presidency of Mohammed Morsi will mean for Egypt’s political future, but the transformation in Egypt goes much deeper. The internal pressures and challenges faced by both Islamists and secularists will impose difficult choices on Egyptian society as a whole in the coming few years. These difficulties will be compounded by the search for a sociopolitical framework that vast sections of the population will accept and that can manage to achieve a broad societal consensus.

This will necessitate political compromises that all key political players in the country should be prepared to accept. The country’s political players will need to be flexible and open to compromises. Indeed, unchallenged political authority will have no place in Egypt in the short or medium term. Despite what appears to be solid entrenchment of the key pillars of Egypt’s ‘first republic,’ unstoppable sociopolitical developments in Egypt over the coming decade will empower democratically elected governments. Some players will be initially strong and will then be weakened by exposure to power and government; others may evolve new power bases with new supporters and constituencies. With time, these multiple political powers will, paradoxically, strengthen society and the state, in part by reducing the country’s reliance on the military for stability. In the medium to long term, the army will cease to be the ultimate source of authority in the country, secularists will close the political gap with Islamists, and the foundations of a solid constitutional parliamentary system may evolve.

Egypt’s second republic is not a new start. Egyptian society carries the achievements and failures and aspirations and frustrations of the past sixty years. The liberal experiment of the first half of the twentieth century gave rise to the beginnings of representation, constitutionalism, and the notion of equal rights and obligations in contemporary citizenship. That experiment crumbled when its leaders detached themselves from the realities of their society and nurtured the illusion of a “Paris on the Nile.” The first republic started with a dream that inspired Egyptians to support a national project “by, for, and of the people.” But the lack of institutional support base, corruption, the rise of a militarist class, the increasing blur between power and wealth over the past thirty-five years, the severe centralization of political and economic power, and the dilution of legitimacy, swept that project away in an avalanche of rejection and resentment. The tens of millions of young Egyptians—Islamists and secularists—can now learn from the mistakes and move on. The land of the Nile has been stagnant for a long time. A deluge of energy is coming. (Tarek Osman/The Cairo Review)

More : http://www.aucegypt.edu/gapp/cairoreview/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=224

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Egypt in the World

Egypt in the World | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt faces steep challenges on the road ahead. The safe and fair drafting of a constitution, the forestallment of a looming economic crisis, the cleansing of a corrupt bureaucratic leviathan—these issues and more will tax the abilities of the new administration. But as progress, however slow, on these domestic political hurdles are made, Egypt should position herself to gradually resume its half century-old position of moral authority and diplomatic preponderance on the regional stage. Maintaining the international legitimacy won during the 2011 revolution will be difficult as domestic politics navigate the quagmire of transition, plus restraining populist politics from generating reactive foreign policy positions will be a challenge. These obstacles are not, however, insurmountable and if Egypt is to secure her place in the new Middle East, she must not shirk her natural role as a leader in the Middle East and Africa.

Egypt’s foreign policy must be one of conscience and principle, not ambition or reckless self-aggrandizement. To lead, she must pursue a strong and proactive set of policies based on a clear determination of her regional and strategic interests. Her policies must be independent but not isolationist, strong but not oppressive. A new Egypt should lead by having the wisdom to learn from the lessons of the past and the foresight to envisage a path through the challenges and opportunities of the future.

(Nabil Fahmy/The Cairo Review)

More : http://www.aucegypt.edu/gapp/cairoreview/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=222

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Egypt President Morsi says no ties with Iran just yet

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s spokesman Yasser Ali was quoted on Saturday as saying that the country has no intentions of restoring diplomatic relations with Iran, only days after it was speculated the president’s visit to Tehran would be a watershed moment for the two countries’ relations.Morsi is to be in the Iranian capital on August 30 to attend the hand over of the presidency of the Non-Aligned Movement to the Iranian government. But according to the state-owned al-Ahram newspaper, he will spend only four hours in the country.

“The matter [of restoring diplomatic ties] is out of the question at this stage,” Yasser Ali told the Saudi-owned newspaper Al-Sharq Al-Awsat in an interview also published in Egyptian media.

Last week, Iran’s Vice-President Ali Akbar Salehi said that the two countries are to restore diplomatic relations after more than 30 years.

Salehi made the statements in an interview with Egypt’s state-run Al-Ahram newspaper, saying that Tehran was looking forward to establishing relations of “friendship and brotherhood” with Cairo.

“Egypt is the cornerstone of the region and has a special stature in the Arab and Muslim countries … and we want relations of friendship and brotherhood with it,” Salehi said, adding that Tehran hoped to restore “normal” relations with Cairo.

“We will pursue this path and restoration of relations depends only on protocol measures.”

Salehi said Egypt’s “revolution opened a new chapter in Egypt’s relations with the outside world,” adding that the Islamic republic would welcome Morsi later this month in Tehran.

The two countries have been at odds since Egypt hosted the ousted Shah following Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution and Egypt’s peace treaty with Israel. (Joseph Mayton/Bikya Masr)

http://www.bikyamasr.com/76234/egypt-president-morsi-says-no-ties-with-iran-just-yet/

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Iran, Egypt to Offset S. Arabia, US in Middle-East

Iran, Egypt to Offset S. Arabia, US in Middle-East | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi is going to side with China and Iran to rebalance the region, an American foreign policy strategist said.

Egypt has been dependent on American aid for decades, previously receiving over a billion dollars a year. Now President Mohamed Mursi is off to China next week seeking investment, which sends a clear message that he is trying to rebalance, shifting away from the West.

Egypt needs immediate cash from the US, the IMF and the Persian Gulf monarchies, but as for Cairo's geopolitical interests, "in the long term [the Egyptians] want to get better with China, who can fill the gap so that they don't have to rely on the West anymore", Michael Hughes, foreign policy strategist at the Washington-based New World Strategies Coalition, told RT.

In return Beijing evidently needs access to the Mediterranean and some Suez Canal priorities, something the US is getting currently, believes Hughes. Though at first it looks like China doesn't get much, the truth is those two things are pretty big as Beijing wants port access, he said.

"They want to ally themselves with non-allied. Allying with Egypt and taking it from us (the US) is a win for China," shared Hughes.

It is no secret that after China, President Mursi will head to Iran, one of the West's main thorns right now. Given the ongoing tensions over Tehran's nuclear projects, it is quite a provocative move.

Yet the feeling between Cairo and Tehran is mutual, insists the foreign policy analyst.

"The unspoken link here is Israel," Hughes said, explaining that Egypt can leverage its relationship to put pressure on Israel to stop this loose talk about bombing Iran.

"Here's the connection, for Mursi starts looking like a geopolitical genius. If he can pull this off, if he can make Israel to step back with the whole 'bombing Iran' thing - that would be pretty amazing," Michael Hughes said.

"After all, if Egypt finds Iran as a partner they don't have to rely on the US or Israel, and they can offset and counterbalance the Persian Gulf monarchies," Hughes explained, saying that the Muslim Brotherhood that Mursi represents has a lot of problems with Saudi Arabia.

It's an interesting dynamic. Even though the Muslim Brotherhood are Sunni - and Iran is Shiite - they have a lot in common against the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Egypt's rapprochement with Iran is, of course, irritating Israel. The US is worrying about simmering violence in the border Sinai region, with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton seeking dialogue between the two countries.

Though slowly, the Muslim Brotherhood - and Egypt where it has come to power - is going to inch away from the US and ultimately Israel is going to understand that they are going to play ball, too, Michael Hughes pointed out. So Israel and Egypt will have to settle their dispute over Sinai (Peninsula).

In the long term Israel will realize that Egypt has all the balls in its court as Israel is vitally dependent on treaties with Egypt - which scares Tel Aviv to death.

With President Mursi at the helm, Egypt is going to be a major player - and soon, as Mursi is going to rebalance the region, Michael Hughes predicts.

Mursi is pretty brilliant. He has an endgame in mind. We don't know what it is. We hope it's not a caliphate," Michael Hughes acknowledged.

"I think Iran and Egypt - they are going to offset the Saudi and the US," Hughes concluded. (Fars news)

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The Cultural Project of the Revolution

The Cultural Project of the Revolution | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

 

"One of my great hopes at the time of the 25 January revolution was that there would emerge from Tahrir not only a reinvention of Egypt’s politics, but a remaking of Egypt’s cultural life — a remaking that would foreground the best of the ‘Tahrir spirit,’ its inclusiveness, its collectivism, its self-sacrifice. Perhaps this is a romantic vision of those 18 days last year, but it strikes me nonetheless as an important vision, a humanistic vision, one that could compete with the vision advanced by Islamists — if given a voice.

Of course, the cultural production that supports Islamist visions of post-Mubarak Egypt is literally everywhere, on every street corner, ranging from pamphlets to talk shows to Ramadan dramas. By contrast, this cultural project of the revolution has only a marginal presence. Admittedly, this is a presence circumscribed, to a great extent, by the political economy of the media. But, if Soueif’s account of the cultural field is accurate, the issue is not simply one of available space, but of the will to claim that space — to advance a humanistic vision of Egypt’s future." (Paul Sedra/Jadaliyya)

More : http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/7049/the-cultural-project-of-the-revolution-

 

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Egypte : 120 tunnels vers Gaza détruits

Egypte : 120 tunnels vers Gaza détruits | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

L’Egypte annonce avoir fermé 120 tunnels dont 12 dans les deux derniers jours à la frontière avec la bande de Gaza. 120 souterrains de fermés et donc surement d’autres, pas encore découverts… une densité incroyable pour un territoire frontalier d‘à peine 4km de long.

Ces passages sous terre servent aussi bien pour les traffiquants de drogues et d’armes (et parfois même de voitures) que pour les terroristes. Ils sont souvent cachés au sein d’habitations ce qui rend leur destruction difficile.

A la base de cette vaste opération de sécurisation – l’attaque du 5 août dernier, attribuée à des islamistes extremistes, qui avait coûté la vie à 16 garde-frontières égyptiens.

Depuis l’Egypte a déployé ses blindés sur le terrain…

outre la fermeture des tunnels, les services secrets égyptiens sont à la recherche de 120 extrémistes dans le Sinaï. (euronews)

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Egypt Al-Azhar cleric to face sanctions for inciting violence

Egypt Al-Azhar cleric to face sanctions for inciting violence | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The complaints office at Egypt's Al-Azhar referred Sheikh Hisham Islam to administrative prosecutors on Sunday for issuing a religious edict earlier this month encouraging the killing of those taking part in Friday's demonstrations against President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from which Morsi hails.

At a forum held at the Egyptian Diplomatic Club on 15 August, Islam made comments that some observers saw as an incitement of violence against anyone participating in the 24 August demonstration. At the event, Islam had said that protesting against the elected president would be tantamount to "high treason against the nation, God, his prophet and Muslims."

"I say stand up against them," Islam had said. "If they fight you, fight them back … if they kill some of you, the victims will go to heaven, and if you kill them that would be righteous."

The Sheikh's statements were subsequently described by Al-Azhar officials as a violation of his professional responsibility.

Al-Azhar's complaints office has also expelled Islam from Al-Azhar's Fatwa committee – of which he had been a member – for issuing religious edicts without first referring them to the committee. (Al-Ahram, via Aswat Masriya)

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U.S. delegation visits Cairo to back economic transformation

U.S. delegation visits Cairo to back economic transformation | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A senior United States delegation will visit Cairo on Monday morning to discuss the support Washington can offer to back political and economic transformation in Egypt.

The delegation will remain in Egypt until August 30 and will meet top Egyptian officials and leading figures in the private sector.

The delegation will seek rebuilding trust and stability in Egypt and its economy and will back finalizing the IMF loan to Cairo, the U.S. State Department has said in a statement Aswat Masriya obtained a copy of. 'Aswat Masriya)

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Egypt politician says Morsi’s Iran visit “shows independence” from US

A former leading member of Parliament in Egypt has said President Mohamed Morsi’s upcoming short visit to Iran “shows independence” from the United States.“Mursi’s presence in Tehran conveys this message to the US and Israel that the era of Egypt’s political obedience to Washington and Tel Aviv has ended,” Sabri Amer told Iran’s Fars News Agency.

“During Hosni Mubarak’s leadership all the decisions and policies in both areas of domestic and foreign policy were made through coordination with the US and the Zionist regime, but the conditions have now changed in Egypt and the era of the ruling of the Egyptian regimes which were allies and loyal to the West has ended,” he added.

Despite the optimism from some Egyptian political leaders and activists on the possibility of renewing relations with Iran, Morsi has said he will not restore diplomatic ties with the Iranian government during his trip to the capital, Tehran on August 30.

Morsi’s spokesman Yasser Ali was quoted on Saturday as saying that the country has no intentions of restoring diplomatic relations with Iran, only days after it was speculated the president’s visit to Tehran would be a watershed moment for the two countries’ relations.

Morsi is to be in the Iranian capital on August 30 to attend the hand over of the presidency of the Non-Aligned Movement to the Iranian government. But according to the state-owned al-Ahram newspaper, he will spend only four hours in the country.

“The matter [of restoring diplomatic ties] is out of the question at this stage,” Yasser Ali told the Saudi-owned newspaper Al-Sharq Al-Awsat in an interview also published in Egyptian media.

Last week, Iran’s Vice-President Ali Akbar Salehi said that the two countries are to restore diplomatic relations after more than 30 years.

Salehi made the statements in an interview with Egypt’s state-run Al-Ahram newspaper, saying that Tehran was looking forward to establishing relations of “friendship and brotherhood” with Cairo.

“Egypt is the cornerstone of the region and has a special stature in the Arab and Muslim countries … and we want relations of friendship and brotherhood with it,” Salehi said, adding that Tehran hoped to restore “normal” relations with Cairo.

“We will pursue this path and restoration of relations depends only on protocol measures.”

Salehi said Egypt’s “revolution opened a new chapter in Egypt’s relations with the outside world,” adding that the Islamic republic would welcome Morsi later this month in Tehran.

The two countries have been at odds since Egypt hosted the ousted Shah following Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution and Egypt’s peace treaty with Israel. (Joseph Mayton/Bikya Masr)

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L'Egypte: pourtant elle tourne!, par Mohieddine Amimour

Les histoires populaires sont un trésor inépuisable de sagesse et une source illimitée d'enseignement. On raconte qu'un paysan dit à son ami en montrant un objet noirâtre à l'horizon lointain: «Regarde ce corbeau, combien il est grand. Son ami conteste: Mais c'est une chèvre.»
Brusquement, l'objet s'envole et le paysan frotte ses mains en disant: «Je t'avais dit c'est un corbeau.» L'autre répond avec un air bien énervé: «C'est toujours une chèvre, même si elle s'envole.»
Cette obstination n'a rien à comparer avec la phrase célèbre de Galilée: «Pourtant il tourne», mais plutôt avec le comportement de certains opposants égyptiens qui n'essayent pas de voir la réalité en face, et, comme certains chez nous, ne savent pas qu'il y a un temps de repli, au moins pour mieux sauter.
Il y a plusieurs semaines, des contradictions se sont créées entre le président de la République égyptienne et un certains nombre de juristes. C'est la levée de boucliers par la gauche ankylosée dans sa rhétorique du siècle passé, et certains dirigeants nasséristes qui n'ont pas compris qu'en politique, la sagesse n'est pas de choisir entre le bon et le mauvais mais entre le mauvais et le moins mauvais.
Tous ont fait l'éloge des hommes de loi égyptiens, au point que certains les ont élevés au niveau des prophètes, condamnant la tendance dictatoriale de Morsi et ds ses «frèrots», et le traitant de tous les noms à sens péjoratifs,...dictateur...ikhouandji...pro-américain...novice... etc. etc. Je me suis dis: C'est de bonne guerre.
La semaine passée, un journal privé étale sur sa première page une série d'accusations, qui, une fois confirmées, peuvent conduire Morsi à la potence.
Tentatives d'assassinat d'opposants, complicité avec «Hamas» pour vendre une partie du Sinaï pour installer un futur Etat palestinien.
Comme n'importe quel régime qui se respecte, la présidence de la République égyptienne dépose une plainte contre le journaliste qui a été présenté pour examen judiciaire. Preuve à l'appui, le juge d'instruction place le journaliste en détention provisoire. Bien que tout le monde insistait sur la séparation des pouvoirs, c'est une autre levée de boucliers contre Morsi qui commence son mandat, dit-on, par l'emprisonnement des représentants du quatrième pouvoir, comme prélude à l'instauration de «l'ikhouanisation» de l'Etat et instituer une nouvelle dictature, pire de celle de Moubarak.
Personne n'a prononcé un mot d'accusation contre le juge qui a prononcé le verdict. Plus malin, Morsi signe le jour même une ordonnance interdisant la détention provisoire de journalistes. C'est le premier acte législatif du président. Mais la contestation continue en accusant Morsi d'hégémonie politique, bien qu'il y ait seulement cinq postes ministériels occupés par le parti qui a gagné les élections, c'est-à-dire, les Frères musulmans. Aucun n'a eu un ministère de souveraineté (Justice, Défense, Intérieur).
Mais les chats affamés qui n'ont pas trouvé leur place au gouvernement ou aux postes supérieurs de la presse ont continué leur contestation médiatique et regroupement «pré paid», avec l'intention maligne de faire perdre au président sa stabilité. Les cent jours de grâce seront donc perdus dans les réactions épidermiques et les contre-coups provoqués par des coups au-dessous de la ceinture.
Les bribes de l'ancien régime et les restes de l'ancien décor démocratique n'arrivent pas à comprendre qu'il y a une nouvelle génération de dirigeants islamiques qui se sont frottés aux pays développés, ont servi comme professeurs dans leurs universités, une génération qui n'a rien des anciens «frérots» et qui a appris comment être rationnels, clairvoyants, bons joueurs d'échecs politiques. Une génération loin des joueurs de dominos et «kharb'ga» et qui sait comment traiter les brebis galeuses. (L'Expression)

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Constitution Ready By End of September - PM Kandil

A draft of the new constitution will be ready by the end of next September, Prime Minister Hisham Kandil said on Saturday, adding that it later will be put to public referendum.

In a statement in Alexandria, Kandil called on all political currents to prepare themselves for the upcoming parliamentary elections to produce a parliament that represents popular will of the Egyptian people.

The August 24 protests which some movements and powers called for "prove undoubtedly that Egyptians have sided with democracy," Kandil stated.

"The cabinet is racing against time to implement the 100-day programme President Mohamed Mursi proposed in his electoral platform," the prime minister added.(All Africa/Aswat Masriya)

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All broken up: new coalitions form as old electoral alliances die out

All broken up: new coalitions form as old electoral alliances die out | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Although new parliamentary elections have not been scheduled yet, political parties are scrambling to form electoral alliances in a bid to get the most seats possible and increase their share from the last parliament.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party will not be running under its Democratic Alliance for Egypt that included liberal and leftist parties and contested the 2011 elections.

The Alliance is all but gone due to the new political realities in Egypt. It was composed of the FJP which dominated its lists, alongside the Nasserist Karama Party, led by former presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabahi, the liberal Ghad Al-Thawra lead by former presidential candidate Ayman Nour, as well as the moderate Islamist Civilisation Party.

Sabahi and Nour both ran in presidential elections against the Brotherhood’s candidate and Sabahi is now seen as a leader of the “third current” that opposes both the former regime and the Brotherhood. Their parties are unlikely to ally with the Brotherhood again.

The Civilisation Party will also not ally with the Brotherhood, preferring to join a more moderate Islamist coalition led by the Wasat Party and former presidential candidate Abdel-Moniem Aboul-Fotouh.

The FJP will instead focus on allying with more Islamist parties, although it will also talk to parties from outside that current.

FJP media officer Ahmed Rabie told the Daily News Egypt that talk of electoral aliances was too early and has not been discussed within the party yet. He did, however, say that the presidential elections revealed a new political compass that would shape any alliances in the future.

The Salafist Nour Party has refuted rumours that it would not join an alliance led by the FJP.

The party is disappointed with the FJP for not keeping many of its promises, specifically the amount of cabinet seats offered to the Nour Party, even though the party backed President Mohamed Morsy, the FJP nominee, in the second round of the presidential race, but party spokesperson Yousry Hammad told the Daily News Egypt that would not stop the party from allying with the FJP.

“We have our opinion regarding the formation of the cabinet which we have made public, but that does not mean we cannot cooperate with the FJP on other matters,” he said.

“The party has a certain ideology and as such is not opposed to forming electoral alliances with others as long as they share that ideology,” he added.

According to Hammad, the issue of electoral alliances of parliamentary elections in general had not been discussed within the party’s high board yet as it was too early.

The party, which led a coalition of conservative Islamist parties in the last election, is in fact more likely to contest the upcoming vote on its own according to statements made by party leader Younes Mekhion to the state-owned Akhbar Al-Youm newspaper on Saturday.

Hammad refused to rule out the idea of electoral alliances, however.

In opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafist parties last year was the Egyptian Bloc, a coalition of liberal and leftist parties that formed the largest opposition front inside parliament despite not having a large number of seats.

It was formed of the liberal Free Egyptian Party, which is concerned with economic liberalism; the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, which adopts a socially liberal, economically leftist, ideology; and the left wing National Progressive Unionist Party (Taggamu) Party.

The ESDP has since left the bloc, citing that it found the other members to be more concerned with the secularist-Islamist divide and less with the former regime-revolution one which led it to support former regime officials over Islamists.

There are however parties and groups that are not divided alongside secular-Islamist lines, preferring to bridge the gap between both directions.

The “Moderate Current Coalition” is composed of the moderate Islamist Wasat Party, former moderate Islamist presidential candidate Abdel-Moniem, Aboul-Fotouh’s new Strong Egypt Party, the Egyptian Current Party which was formed by dissatisfied revolutionary youth who left the Muslim Brotherhood, the moderate Islamist Civilisation Party, the centrist Justice Party as well as the April 6 Youth and Masrina movements.

The coalition is not just an electoral alliance, however, but rather is a political one according to Wasat spokesperson Amr Farouk.

“We have formed a political alliance because electoral alliances usually don’t last as we have seen. The Nasserist Karama Party and the Muslim Brotherhood allied for example even though they have opposing ideologies,” Farouk told the Daily News Egypt.

He added that the Moderate Current Coalition was built on the basis of a political vision and not elections, and that it aimed to break the polarisation currently present on the political scene with the Muslim Brotherhood and more radical Islamists on one side and liberals and leftists on the other.

“Both choices do not represent the Egyptian people who are moderate, but in the previous elections all the moderate parties with the exception of Wasat were unknown which is why the results were so polarised,” he said.

The coalition aims to build political research centres and start awareness campaigns and development projects, not just contest elections, according to Farouk.

Members of the parties making up the coalition met on Saturday to draft a document stating the goals of the coalition, to be presented to all the parties on Monday.

But with the April 6 movement and the Egyptian Current Party both joining the coalition, there seems to be no alliances built on a revolutionary platform.

In the last elections revolutionary youth were represented by an unlikely alliance of Islamist, liberal and leftist parties and groups. The alliance, “The Revolution Continues” was able to maintain its unity but failed to garner more than two percent of the vote.

It was composed of the Coalition of Revolutionary Youth, which has since been disbanded, the Egyptian Current Party which has now joined the moderate coalition, the liberal Egypt Freedom Party led by former MP Amr Hamzawy, as well as the Socialist Popular Alliance Party and the Egyptian Socialist Party. The SPAP and the ESP have decided to merge into one socialist party.

These developments mean that most of the participants in the “Revolution Continues” alliance have either moved on to other coalitions or ceased to exist altogether, meaning the alliance is over.

Hope is not lost for revolutionary parties, however. The newly formed Dostour (constitution) Party led by Nobel laureate Mohamed El-Baradei says it aims to be a catch-all “big tent” party that serves to gather revolutionary youth from across the political spectrum. The party membership includes many prominent liberal, leftists and even Salafist figures.

The Egyptian Social Democratic Party is even now looking to join Dostour, either in a coalition or a full merger. (Ahmed Aboul Enein /Daily News Egypt)

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The “Be a Man” campaign is launched in the metro

The “Be a Man” campaign is launched in the metro | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

About 20 male and female activists chose campaigning over sleep on Friday morning and plastered posters inside and outside the female metro carriages that read “The female carriage is for women only” in a new campaign called “Be a man.” The campaign’s name suggests that better men ride in the mixed carriage, not the female carriage.

Shereen Badr is among a group of activists who decided launch the campaign on Friday, which received a mixed response.

“Of course we were subjected to aggravation. People from the lowest ranking workers to the highest ranking employees who passed us by would tell us to go and get permission from the stationmaster, which we did do,” Badr explained.

“And by the end of the day, some of our stickers were taken down.”

Men have frequently been riding in the female metro carriages, set aside for women only. Badr has been actively trying to combat the frequent violations she sees in the metro and has decided to file a law suit against the Ministry of Interior, she told the Daily News Egypt.

“I’m filing a law suit against [the Ministry of the Interior] for negligence and failure to do their jobs” she said. There are many problems in the metro, Badr said, including men entering female carriages and the frequent presence of unlicensed vendors in the metro.

“I have already started communicating with rights lawyers and we will start filing reports and we will ask anyone who has filed reports to send them to us. We will also use the pictures and videos that we have [of the violations].” Badr is using Twitter and Facebook to encourage those willing to help in the lawsuit to join her and the lawyers.

Earlier this month, Badr took part in a protest held inside the metro protesting the death of Madeeha Saber, who reportedly died when the metro stopped in a tunnel for about a half hour.

The metro is run by the governmental Egyptian Company for Metro Management & Operation and is the first metro to be built in Africa and the Arab World. It is also among the cheapest methods of transportation in Cairo with a ticket price of EGP 1. (Hend Kortam/Daily News Egypt)

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Islamism Now

Islamism Now | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s revolution is transforming the country’s Islamist landscape. The first wave of protests, which lasted for eighteen days and successfully ousted President Hosni Mubarak after three decades in office, triggered revolutionary changes within the country’s Islamist movement. The Muslim Brotherhood (MB), Egypt’s largest organized political group, serves as a good example. The group—which stood united despite (or because of) oppression for long decades—witnessed major transformations in just a few months. After years of of insisting on the all-encompassing nature of the organization, it was only a few days after Mubarak’s ousting that the group announced its intention to establish an independent political party and to retreat from politics and focus on social activities.

The MB-aligned Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) was soon established, and its leaders had to resign from the MB’s executive council. The party’s platform avoided controversial stances adopted earlier by the draft manifesto released by the Brotherhood in 2007, including banning women and Copts from running for president. Within a few months, and parallel to the establishment of the FJP, some major splits took place within the MB; most important was the dismissal of Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, the group’s iconic reformist leader, after he announced his candidacy for president. This was followed by the dismissal of many young cadres who had played a role during the eighteen days in Tahrir Square and who later came to form their own party: the Egyptian Current.

Revolutionary impact was not limited to the MB. Traditionally apolitical Salafi groups began to seek a political role in revolutionary Egypt. With no significant participation in the early days of protests, some Salafi groups joined the uprising a few days before Mubarak stepped down. Their politicization became more obvious later, when they started institutionalizing their political activities and formed different political parties the potential of which is yet to be seen.

Attempting to understand these changes requires proper scrutiny of both movements’ internal dynamics and ideology, as well as the governing external context. Two sets of variables affect Islamist movements’ political outlook: perceived identity threat and political opportunity. The definition of the former varies due to differences in ideological orientation and political maturity, and its presence leads to Islamists’ increased detachment from society and—consequently—their stagnation and unity. The latter, on the contrary, leads to inclusion and attachment that breeds diversity stemming from the emergence of more sophisticated forms of affiliation to Islamic identity. Post-revolutionary Islamism is therefore likely to witness further sliding transformation that will eventually lead to the transcendence of identity-based Islamism and the emergence of a new wave of diverse, policy-based Islamist activism.

The landscape of Islamist organizations prior to the Egyptian revolution was comprised of five main groups. First among them was the official religious establishment, at the heart of which lies Al-Azhar. Despite its legacy of centuries of scholarship, the institution had been increasingly disempowered and discredited since the 1950s. The MB, established in the late 1920s, represents along with its offshoots the second key player in the pre-revolution Islamist domain, being the country’s largest opposition group and the world’s oldest Islamist group. Third was the Salafi trend, which has been on the ascent in Egypt since the 1970s. Despite having a handful of institutional incubators, Salafism remains a largely social movement, with the vast majority of Salafis not being attached to any organization prior to the revolution. Fourth were the Sufi orders. While dominating the socio-religious scene until the turn of the nineteenth century, Sufi orders have been on the decline ever since, as they have come increasingly under the control of the state and lost social legitimacy. Neoliberal Islam—manifested in the discourse and audience of new preachers—represents the last group of pre-revolutionary Islamist actors. The trend emerged in Egypt in the 1990s and developed a strong presence among urban upper-middle classes. Other groups, including Al-Jama‘a Al-Islamiya and Al-Jihad, were significant during the 1980s and 1990s, but have been on the decline ever since, and have established close ties with either Salafi or MB groups. (Ibrahim El-HoudaibyThe Cairo Review)

More : http://www.aucegypt.edu/gapp/cairoreview/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=217

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One killed and seven injured in Alexandria workers' protest

One person died and seven were injured after a workers' protest turned violent at the Abu Qir power plant in Alexandria on Saturday.

Protesters had gathered to protest their grievances with the company. Clashes broke out after Central Security forces stationed to protect the building learned that the company leaders had been detained by protesters, who had blocked the entrances and exits of the plant.

Security then tried to disperse the crowd, and over 500 protesters responded by charging the building. Security forces then exchanged fire with the crowd, killing one and wounding seven. Saturday evening, efforts were still underway to control the situation.

Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm (Egypt independent)

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Egypt, Gulf States strengthen their ties

Egypt, Gulf States strengthen their ties | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

During the Egyptian revolution, the Gulf States distanced themselves from. Bonds between Egypt and the Gulf are forming again now in accordance with an old rule: Good relationships are based on mutual benefits.

Cairo and the Arab Gulf states are currently taking steps towards each other, and for many it's a sign of a new beginning. Traditionally, Egyptian relations to the Gulf States have been positive; under Mubarak, too, friendships existed between the different heads of state - but these relationships have also often cooled.

Over the course of the past six years, and especially during the Arab Spring, two political axes emerged: Egypt - Saudi Arabia on the one side, and Syria - Qatar on the other. After the fall of Mubarak, these axes shifted, with Qatar welcoming the uprising on the Nile and in Damascus, while Saudi Arabia maintained its support for Mubarak until the end.

Indeed, Egypt's foreign policy towards the Gulf States has been and still is based on a calculation involving three factors: competing with Riyadh over political importance in the region, realising its own economic interests and strengthening its policy of alliances across the Middle East. (DW)

More : http://www.dw.de/dw/article/0,,16193917,00.html

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U.S. Government Economic Delegation to Cairo

U.S. Government Economic Delegation to Cairo | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A delegation of senior U.S. economic officials will visit Cairo August 27-30 to meet with senior Egyptian officials as well as private sector leaders. The delegation will follow up on Secretary Clinton’s July visit, during which President Morsi and senior Egyptian officials identified broad-based economic growth and job creation as top priorities for the U.S. partnership with Egypt.

The delegation will discuss with the Egyptian government steps to rebuild stability and confidence in Egypt as well as grow its economy, and encourage completion of an agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). They will discuss assistance the United States can provide to further support Egypt’s political and economic transition, which aims to realize the aspirations of greater opportunity for all Egyptians.

Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy and the Environment Robert D. Hormats will lead the delegation, which includes senior representatives from the White House, Department of the Treasury, United States Agency for International Development, Office of the United States Trade Representative, and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation

 

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Premier test de la rue pour Mohamed Morsi

Premier test de la rue pour Mohamed Morsi | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

La route menant au Palais présidentiel bloquée ; La police egyptienne barricadée, et au moins cinq blessés. Voilà le résultat au Caire des manifestations organisées depuis hier contre Mohamed Morsi. Moins de deux mois après l’arrivée au pouvoir du successeur d’Hosni Mubarak, les pancartes se font critiques : “Non aux Frères musulmans”.

“Voilà déjà 65 jours que Mohamed Morsi est au pouvoir… et pour l’instant il n’a rien fait pour remplir les promesses qu’il devait tenir dans les 100 premiers jours. Il lui reste environ 40 jours, qu’est ce qu’il va réussir à réaliser pendant ce temps, hein ?”

Place Tahrir, épicentre symbolique de la contestation politique, ils sont des centaines à désavouer le parti au pouvoir. Les meneurs réclament l’ouverture d’une enquête sur le financement du groupe islamiste.
Mais toute l’opposition libérale n’est pas déscendue dans la rue, certains préfèrent les urnes pour s’exprimer.

(euronews)

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