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revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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En Égypte, les violences policières attisent la colère

En Égypte, les violences policières attisent la colère | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
La mort d'un manifestant «disparu» place Tahrir a provoqué de nouveaux heurts lundi soir à Tantah, dans le delta du Nil . Les opposants demandent une refonte de l'appareil policier.
Egypt-actus's insight:

En Égypte , la colère est toujours à son comble. Lundi soir, de violents heurts ont éclaté à Tantah, dans le Delta du Nil, lors des funérailles de l'activiste Mohammed al-Guindi, décédé à la suite de sévices infligés par la police. Très remontés, des manifestants ont jeté des pierres sur les forces de l'ordre venues encadrer le cortège. Ces dernières ont aussitôt répliqué par des tirs de grenades lacrymogènes et de chevrotine. Le ministère de la Santé fait état d'au moins 18 blessés.

Âgé de 28 ans et membre du parti du Courant populaire de Hamdine Sabahi, Mohammed al-Guindi avait disparu le 25 janvier sur la place Tahrir. Ce jour-là, la foule s'était rassemblée pour commémorer les deux ans du soulèvement anti-Moubarak et dénoncer le «détournement» de la révolution par le président Morsi. Le jeune activiste était retrouvé quatre jours plus tard dans le coma, à l'hôpital Dar al-Hilal. Son avocat, Mohammed Abdel Aziz, avait confié au Figaro qu'il disposait de preuves et de témoignages selon lesquels Mohammed al-Guindi avait été torturé dans un camp tenu par la police, avant d'être emmené à l'hôpital. Selon un premier rapport médical, il a été battu avec des objets contondants. Ses tortionnaires lui ont vraisemblablement brisé les côtes et fait subir des chocs électriques. (Delphine Minoui/Le Figaro)

 

Plus : http://www.lefigaro.fr/international/2013/02/05/01003-20130205ARTFIG00445-en-egypte-les-violences-policieres-attisent-la-colere.php

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Police brutality persists two years after Egypt revolution: Rights activists

According to the report, 225 people have been detained from the vicinity of Cairo's Tahrir Square since the second anniversary of Egypt's January 25 Revolution, which coincided with mass rallies against the government and President Mohamed Morsi.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Those detained have included minors who were subject to torture and days-long incarceration at Central Security Forces (CSF) training camps, the report asserts. Detentions were officially said to have been "pending investigation," but according to the report's authors, detentions were generally employed as punishment and were unnecessary to investigations.

 

The report notes one case in particular in which 12 young people – including eight minors – were referred to the Abbasiya prosecutor's office. The young people had reportedly suffered injuries as a result of police torture and were therefore detained for four days "pending investigation."

 

Egypt's April 6 Youth Movement also released a statement on Sunday asserting that one of its members, Hossam El-Din Abdel-Hamid, had gone missing. The youth group alleged that Abdel-Hamid had been detained, suggesting that that the interior ministry had refrained from referring him to prosecutors – along with others who had been detained with him – in order to conceal the torture he had been subject to at the hands of police.

 

"Abdel-Hamid was brutally beaten and is suffering from a severe injury and has not been referred to the prosecution until this minute," April 6 stated. "When we asked about him we were told by a police officer that he had been moved to the Khalifa Police Station…but when we went there to ask about him we were told he was at the Qasr El-Nil Police Station and there they again denied his presence."

 

The rights activists' report echoed the youth group's allegations, stating that many of those reported missing were later found to have been illegally detained, mostly in the Gabal El-Ahmar and Tora CSF training camps. Unlike prisons or police stations, neither of these facilities represent official detention centres.

 

"Most of those arrested [estimated at more than 600 since 25 January] are now being detained in CSF camps that are not made or equipped for detention," Malek Adly, a rights lawyer and one of the report's authors, told Ahram Online. "Unlike prisons or police stations, these camps aren't equipped to provide prisoners with meals, so detainees are often left without food or water for long periods."

 

The report added that since detainees were not referred to prosecutors they lacked any access to family members or lawyers.

 

Only after the media had exposed cases of missing persons, the report continued, eight of them were finally referred to the Qasr El-Nil prosecutor's office on 30 January – following five days of illegal detention. Abdeen's criminal court later ordered their immediate release, arguing that the means by which they were detained had been illegal. (Ahram Online)

 

More : http://news.egypt.com/english/permalink/171315.html

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Egyptian opposition says police tortured activist to death - World - CBC News

Egyptian opposition says police tortured activist to death - World - CBC News | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

An Egyptian opposition party on Monday claimed police tortured one of its members to death, electrocuting him and beating him repeatedly on the head — the latest case alleging police brutality in a crackdown on anti-government protesters.

Mohammed el-Gindy, a 28-year-old activist, died of his wounds early Monday at a Cairo hospital after he was "tortured to death," the Egyptian Popular Current party said in a statement.

The Interior Ministry had no immediate comment.

El-Gindy went missing for several days after protesting on Jan. 27 in Cairo's Tahrir Square. The protesters are opposed to Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi's policies and are pressing him to amend the constitution, which was drafted by a panel dominated by Islamists and approved in a public referendum last year.

Party spokeswoman Mona Amer said she saw el-Gindy's body and that it carried marks of torture. She said he was electrocuted, had broken ribs and a "cord appeared to have been wrapped around his neck." A medical report cited brain hemorrhage as cause of death.

Party members were organizing a funeral for el-Gindy and Mohammed Saad, a 20-year-old protester, who also died of his wounds sustained during clashes with security forces on Friday.

More than 60 people have died in recent protests across Egypt that began on Jan. 24, the eve of the second anniversary of the start of the uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

Beating caught on video

The deaths of the two activists come days after a video surfaced showing riot police beating and dragging naked a man during Friday clashes near Egypt's presidential palace. The man, Hamada Saber, initially denied police abuse and said protesters undressed him. But later he changed his account of what happened, saying he lied to avoid more problems.

Egypt promises inquiry into police attack on naked protester

The beating was caught on camera by The Associated Press, and the video was broadcast live on Egyptian television late Friday as protests raged in the streets outside the presidential palace. The AP video showed police trying to bundle the naked man into a police van after beating him.

The beating prompted a rare statement of regret from the Interior Ministry, which promised to investigate the attack. The president's office said it was pained by the images and called the assault "shocking."

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Interior Minister: If Police service collapses, Egypt to turn into militia State

Interior Minister: If Police service collapses, Egypt to turn into militia State | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

During a press conference held on Saturday 2/2/2013 at the Ministry's headquarters, Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim warned if the police collapsed, Egypt will turn into a militia State just like some neighboring countries.

Ibrahim stressed that the police are a national service that belong to the people and work for the sake of the Egyptian citizen's security and safety.

The minister pointed out that the ministry has developed a strategy to deploy security forces in order to protect peaceful demonstrations that were held around Ittihadiya Palace and Tahrir square within the framework of the so-called "Salvation Friday".

He added that the security forces were surprised by 300 people who insisted on throwing flame balls, Molotov cocktails and fireworks at a gate the Presidential Palace and so the police had to use water canons to drive them back.

Fifteen Police officers and conscripts were injured during clashes between the security forces and rioters on al-Ahram Street, while 11 rioters were arrested, Ibrahim said.

Ibrahim added that there are some elements that carry on with creating chaos in Egypt's streets which are witnessing unprecedented violence, calling on all political powers to keep the police far from political conflicts.

 

(Egypt State Information Service)

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Security official: Morsy rejected police request to use greater force

Security official: Morsy rejected police request to use greater force | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The president refused a police request to allow them to use greater force with protesters around the presidential palace, Deputy Assistant Interior Minister for Public Security Abdel Fattah Othman said, adding that he ordered police to use only tear gas.

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Interior Minister Warns Egypt Could Turn into Militia

Interior Minister Warns Egypt Could Turn into Militia | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s Interior Minister warned yesterday that if country’s police forces were to collapse, Egypt would become a militia-state like some neighboring countries.

 

The grim assessment by Interior Minister Muhammad Ibrahim— who offered to resign if it were to satisfy the Egyptian people—comes after eight days of protests that killed nearly 60 people.

 

Furthermore, a video of a demonstrator stripped naked, dragged across the ground and beaten with batons by helmeted riot police has fired Egyptians to a new level of outrage.(...)

 

However, the protester in the video, Hamada Saber, later said in an interview from his hospital bed that the riot police were helping him rather than beating him, a statement Saber’s family disputes and says was made under police pressure. Moreover, Saber’s hospital statement contradicts the Interior Ministry’s statement.

 

Speaking to reporters Interior Minister Ibrahim said that initial results from the public prosecutor's investigation show that 48-year-old Hamada Saber was undressed by "rioters" during skirmishes between police and protesters. He was then hit in the foot by a bird shot, the interior minister said, stopping short of saying if the injury was a result of police firing into the crowds.

"The central security forces then found him lying on the ground and tried to put him in an armored vehicle, though the way in which they did that was excessive," said Ibrahim.

However, a woman identifying herself as Mr. Saber’s daughter Randa, said in on Egyptian television that her father was forced to lie during the interview and was “afraid to talk.”(...)

 

"This shows that state institutions are collapsing, as is the rule of law. We are living in chaos," said lawyer Achraf Shazly, 35. "Next thing you know, the martyr killed yesterday will rise from the dead and say he wasn't shot." (...)

 

The rise of Mursi—the first freely elected leader in Egypt's 5,000-year history—is probably the single most important change achieved by two years of revolts across the Arab world. But seven months since taking office, he has failed to unite Egyptians. Street unrest and political instability threaten to render the most populous Arab state ungovernable.

 

The latest round of violence was triggered by the second anniversary of the uprising against Mubarak and death sentences handed down last week in Port Said over a soccer stadium riot.

Mursi has had little opportunity to reform the police and security forces he inherited from Mubarak and the military men.(...)

 

"The instructions of the interior minister to use excessive violence in confronting protesters does not seem like surprising behavior given the clear incitement by prominent figures in the presidency," said opposition coalition spokesman Khaled Daoud.

Egypt-actus's insight:

The liberal, leftist and secularist opposition accuses Mursi of betraying the revolution that toppled Mubarak by concentrating too much power in his own hands and those of his Muslim Brotherhood, a formerly underground Islamist movement.

 

Mursi and the Brotherhood accuse the opposition of stoking street unrest to further their demands for a national unity government as a way to retake power they lost at the ballot box.

 

In announcing an investigation into the beating of Saber, Mursi's office made clear he was still pointing the blame at the political opponents who have encouraged protests.

 

"What has transpired over the past day is not political expression, but rather acts of criminality. The presidency will not tolerate vandalism or attacks on individuals and property. The police have responded to these actions in a restrained manner," Mursi's office said.

 

"Doubtless, in the heat of the violence, there can be violations of civil liberties, and the presidency equally will not tolerate such abuses. In one incident, an individual was seen to be dragged and beaten by police. The Minister of Interior has, appropriately, announced an investigation."

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Stripped man denies assault claims

Hamada Saber Ali, a protester who was stripped, beaten, and dragged by Central Security Forces (CSF) on Friday has denied being attacked by CSF.

During investigations conducted on Saturday by the Heliopolis prosecution office at the police hospital where Ali is currently receiving treatment, Ali claimed that protesters attacked and stripped him because they thought he was a CSF member. He explained that he was wearing black clothes similar to the uniforms of CSF members. Ali added that the security forces rescued him from the protesters and transferred him to the hospital.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Waleed Nada, an activist working with injured revolutionaries who participated in Friday’s protests, has denounced Ali’s claims. Nada added that Ali was probably threatened by figures from the Ministry of Interior to force him to deny their attack, explaining that the video showed CSF as they beat Ali and dragged him to a CSF vehicle. “Those who appeared in the video cannot be protesters, because they dragged Ali into the CSF vehicle. Would any protester be able to do that?” Nada asked.

Nada claimed that many poor men might issue false statements in exchange for some benefits from the government. “I think this is what happened with Ali,” he added.

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/02/stripped-man-denies-assault-claims/

 

*************************************

 

From Al-Masri Al-Youm, via Egypt.com

 

Prosecutors are now claiming that Hamada Saber, who was dragged, stripped naked and beaten up in front of the Ettehadiya Presidential Palace, was actually assaulted by protesters, and that security forces were the ones that came to his rescue.

 

The Heliopolis Prosecution is alleging that Saber denied reports that security assaulted him. Prosecutors claim he told them that protesters assaulted him, thinking he was from the security forces because he was wearing black.

 

According to prosecutors, Saber was also initially beaten by security forces who thought he was a demonstrator.

 

The prosecutors' claims fly in the face of overwhelming reports and video evidence to the contrary. A video from the Al-Hayat satellite channel showed the protester being assaulted by security forces, and the Interior Ministry released a statement expressing regret over the incident.

 

Additionally, Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim personally telephoned Saber on Saturday to apologize for the attack, promising Saber that the ministry would assist him with healthcare and finding a job after his recovery.

 

Saber's beating has further provoked the wrath of protesters opposed to President Mohamed Morsy and the Muslim Brotherhood government, and comes after earlier reports from Human Rights Watch and other organizations warning that human rights violations have continued unabated in Egypt even after Morsy's election last summer.

http://news.egypt.com/english/permalink/171049.html

 




Almasry Alyoum

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Video of protester stripped and beaten fires Egypt fury

Video of protester stripped and beaten fires Egypt fury | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

(Reuters, via Aswat Masriya) - After eight days of protests that killed nearly 60 people, a video of one demonstrator stripped naked, dragged across the ground and beaten with truncheons by helmeted riot police has fired Egyptians to a new level of outrage.

Hamada Saber, a middle-aged man, lay in a police hospital on Saturday, the morning after he was shown on television naked, covered in soot and thrashed by half a dozen policemen who had pulled him to an armoured vehicle near the presidential palace.

President Mohamed Mursi's office promised an investigation of the incident, which followed the deadliest wave of bloodshed of his seven-month rule. His opponents say it proves that he has chosen to order a brutal crackdown like that carried out by Hosni Mubarak against the uprising that toppled him in 2011.

"Mursi has been stripped bare and has lost his legitimacy. Done," tweeted Ahmed Maher, founder of the April 6 youth movement that helped launch the anti-Mubarak protests.

************************


AFP, via Le Point

L'opposition égyptienne a appelé samedi à la démission du ministre de l'Intérieur après des séquences vidéo montrant un homme nu sauvagement battu et traîné lors de la répression vendredi soir d'une manifestation devant le palais présidentiel au Caire. "Les images horribles et déshonorantes montrant des officiers de la sécurité centrale et des policiers traînant et battant sauvagement un homme complètement nu autour du palais présidentiel doivent conduire à une démission immédiate du ministre de l'Intérieur" Mohamed Ibrahim, a dit Khaled Daoud, porte-parole du Front du salut national (FSN), principale coalition de l'opposition. Une telle affaire "ne peut pas être réglée par de simples excuses du porte-parole du ministère de l'Intérieur", a-t-il ajouté, alors que les images, diffusées par des chaînes de télévision et sur l'internet, suscitaient de vives réactions sur les réseaux sociaux.

Sur la vidéo, on voit des policiers antiémeute battre avec des matraques l'homme nu, la cinquantaine, qu'ils ont traîné avant de l'embarquer dans un fourgon blindé, en poste devant le palais. Le FSN devait se réunir dans l'après-midi pour examiner sa stratégie après les violents affrontements entre manifestants hostiles au président Mohamed Morsi et les forces antiémeute devant le palais présidentiel qui ont fait un mort et des dizaines de blessés vendredi. Pourtant le pouvoir et l'ensemble de la classe politique s'étaient engagés jeudi à favoriser le dialogue pour sortir de la grave crise politique et à prévenir la violence. La présidence de la République a dénoncé "des actes de vandalisme" ayant émaillé les manifestations de vendredi et évoqué dans un communiqué de possibles "violations des libertés civiles".

http://www.lepoint.fr/monde/egypte-une-video-d-un-homme-nu-sauvagement-battu-par-la-police-fait-scandale-02-02-2013-1623029_24.php

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Les forces de police appréhendent violemment un manifestant après l'avoir entièrement dévêtu

تابعونا علي صفحة الفيسبوك http://www.facebook.com/RadarEgy?ref=hl تابعونا علي صفحة التويتر https://twitter.com/RadarMasr قوات الأمن تسحل أحد المتظاهرين و تلق...
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Egypt's cops regain Mubarak era notoriety

Egypt's cops regain Mubarak era notoriety | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
With near impunity and the backing of the Islamist president, Egyptian police have been accused of firing wildly at protesters, beating them and lashing out with deadly force in clashes across much of the country the past week, regaining their Hosni Mubarak-era notoriety as a tool of repression.


In the process, nearly 60 people have been killed and hundreds injured, and the security forces have re-emerged as a significant political player after spending the two years since Mubarak's ouster on the sidelines, sulking or unwilling to fully take back the streets.

Moreover, President Mohammed Morsi, whose Muslim Brotherhood was long oppressed by the security forces, has made it clear that he needs the police on his side to protect his still shaky grip on power. On state TV on Sunday, he thanked the police for their response to the protests, a day after dozens had been killed in the Mediterranean city of Port Said.

Riot police continued on Thursday to battle rock-throwing protesters in an area near Tahrir Square in central Cairo, the seventh day of clashes in the wave of political violence that has engulfed Egypt — though battles elsewhere have eased somewhat.

The police's furious response to the protests and riots — some of which targeted their stations and left two police officers dead — uncovered the depth of discontent in the once all-powerful security forces. Since Mubarak's fall, they have been demoralised and in disarray. But now they are signalling that they want back the status they held under his rule, when no one questioned their use of force and they had unlimited powers of arrest.

"The police saw the protests as an opportunity to show they are strong, capable and ready to crush them," said rights lawyer Negad Borai. "They knew they had political cover, to which they responded by using a disproportionate amount of force."

The Interior Ministry, in charge of police, says its forces showed restraint and pointed out that dozens of police were injured in the clashes, along with the two dead. It has also staunchly denied that police fired birdshot at protesters in the street fighting. At least three protesters are known to have been killed by birdshot, and many others have shown wounds from the metal pellets riddling their torsos and heads.

Highly unusual mood

Five different interior ministers have headed the forces in the past two years, and none has been able to exercise full control over the unsettled ranks.


Distraught police officers heckled the latest interior minister, Mohammed Ibrahim, when he showed up for the funeral of the two officers killed last weekend. They accused him of being there only for the news cameras, and raised such a storm that the minister, surrounded by his bodyguards, left the mosque and the funeral went ahead without him. Later, Ibrahim said in a statement that he understood the officers were under stress.


Some in the force are seething over what they see as the inadequate firepower given to the police in the face of attackers who have frequently targeted police stations and prisons over the past two years.(...)

 

Excessive force

Morsi, who came to office seven months ago as Egypt's first freely elected president, has been trying to woo the police, praising them for the few steps that have been taken to restore law and order.

Last week, the black-clad riot police appeared for the first time in new, protective gear that reduces their vulnerability to rocks and firebombs and conceal much of their faces. In a first, the police also received three patrol helicopters.(...)

 

Human rights abuses

"In a sense, Morsi is making decisions that are similar to those of his predecessors," she said about the president's apparent abandonment of plans to reform the police and instead focus on winning them over.

"It is short sighted," she said.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Revolutionaries and rights activists blame the police for the death of nearly 900 protesters during the revolution and dozens more in unrest that followed Mubarak's overthrow. The police, on their part, say they shot to kill when their lives were in danger as bands of armed protesters stormed police stations across much of the country.

More than a 100 policemen have been put on trials on charges of killing protesters, but almost all were acquitted. The latest example came Thursday when a court in Sharqiyah acquitted the Nile Delta province's former police chief and seven of his top aides on charges of killing protesters in 2011.

Mubarak and his security chief, former interior minister Habib el-Adly, were convicted of failing to prevent the killings and sentenced in June to life in prison. Both successfully appealed their sentences and will now face a new trial.

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Morsy instructs police deal with 'rioters' with restraint

Morsy instructs police deal with 'rioters' with restraint | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

President Mohamed Morsy met on Tuesday afternoon with the interior minister and other ministry leaders.

Presidential spokesperson Yasser Ali said Morsy gave instructions to protect peaceful protesters by firmly dealing with troublemakers, rioters and outlaws, yet with utmost restraint and in accordance with the law.

Morsy’s instructions came as protests continue in Cairo and across several governorates.

Egypt-actus's insight:

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/morsy-instructs-police-deal-rioters-restraint

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Police officers in four governorates threaten strike

Police officers in four governorates threaten strike | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Police officers in Alexandria, Minya, Assiut and Fayoum have threatened to strike if the security directorates or Interior Ministry do not take steps to safeguard police stations and headquarters from protesters attempting to storm the buildings. They issued a call to assemble in front of directorate headquarters at 3 pm on Monday.

Egypt-actus's insight:

The police condemn "describing these people [who attempt to storm police headquarters] as revolutionaries and martyrs," said a statement published on the Facebook page "Police Officers Revolution." The statement went on to call such individuals "offenders" and "thugs" who are inciting chaos.

They demanded that the police be fully armed "to confront acts of thuggery."

A coalition of officers across the four governorates asserted that if their demands are not met, security directorates would be broken into and their chiefs expelled.

Governorates across the country have been subject to violent clashes between police and demonstrators since protests marking the anniversary of the 25 January revolution on Friday. Dozens have been killed and hundreds injured in the course of demonstrations against President Mohamed Morsy and the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Rights group: Egypt's police behave like 'gang'

Rights group: Egypt's police behave like 'gang' | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A rights group charges Egypt's police are "acting like a gang," torturing detainees and retaliating for attacks against them.

The report released Tuesday by The Egyptian Initiative For Personal Rights charges that President Mohammed Morsi failed to reform the police during his term's first four months. Morsi took office last June 30.

The police were among the most hated bodies under deposed President Hosni Mubarak, responsible for flagrant abuses, torture and unjustified detention. Police behavior was a main spur of the 2011 uprising.

The report documents three cases of detainees tortured to death by police during the four-month period. It called police practices "systematic torture," random shooting and collective punishment.

"The police are acting like a gang taking revenge for assaults," the report said.

There was no immediate government comment.


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/01/22/3194762/rights-group-egypts-police-behave.html#storylink=cpy

 

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Cairo Police beating: US urges Egypt to control police

Cairo Police beating: US urges Egypt to control police | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The US has urged Egypt to investigate cases of police abuse after a man was stripped and beaten by uniformed officers near the presidential palace.

The state department said it was "extremely disturbed" by the dragging of naked Hamada Saber, which was caught on camera, through the streets.

Egypt's culture minister has resigned in the aftermath of the incident.

Protests were continuing late on Monday after the funeral of another activist beaten by police, Mohammed al-Guindi.

Opponents of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi say the death proves the police have not reformed in the two years since authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak was ousted.

"We urge the government of Egypt to thoroughly, credibly and independently investigate all claims of violence and wrongdoing by security officials and demonstrators and to bring perpetrators to justice," said state department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.

"Accountability is the best way to prevent recurrences of these kinds of incidents."

 

For his part, Mr Morsi said in a Facebook message that he had asked the public prosecutor to investigate the death of Mohammed al-Guindi.

He emphasised there was "no return to rights abuses of citizens and their freedoms... after the January 25 revolution" - in reference to the popular uprising that toppled Mubarak in February 2011.

State collapse?

 

State collapse?

Hamda Saber said he was initially coerced by police into giving a false account of the attack

On Sunday, Mr Saber said he had been coerced by police into initially giving a false account of his attack, saying that had he blamed them, they would have accused him of carrying petrol bombs at the demonstration.

The 50-year-old painter said police had subsequently apologised to him for any wrongdoing.

State TV reported Culture Minister Mohammed Saber Arab resigned on Monday (...)

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Egypte: le décès d'un militant relance les appels à une réforme de la police

Egypte: le décès d'un militant relance les appels à une réforme de la police | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le décès lundi d'un militant après sa détention par la police et des images d'un manifestant dénudé et battu par des agents des forces de l'ordre relancent les appels à une réforme de l'appareil policier en Egypte, comme lors de la révolte qui fit chuter Hosni Moubarak il y a deux ans.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Il y a deux ans, la réforme de la police, accusée de bénéficier d'une impunité systématique pour ses nombreuses exactions, était l'une des principales revendications des Egyptiens descendus dans les rues.

"La police égyptienne pratique systématiquement la violence et la torture, parfois elle tue", a dénoncé l'EIPR dans un rapport publié la semaine dernière, en indiquant enquêter sur des dizaines de cas de torture ces derniers mois.

"Il n'y a pas eu de changement de fond, ou même une amélioration cosmétique, dans l'appareil policier en matière de structure administrative, de prise de décision, de contrôle du travail de la police, ou de réforme et de renvoi des officiers et agents responsables de torture et de meurtres", a ajouté l'ONG.

"Les jeunes sont encore torturés et tués dans leur quête de dignité", a souligné Mohamed ElBaradei, une figure de proue de l'opposition.

"Derrière chaque martyr, il y a une police corrompue", a renchérit Gamal Eid, un des défenseurs des droits de l'Homme les plus connus en Egypte.

Lundi, des centaines de personnes ont participé sur la place Tahrir à une prière à la mémoire de Mohamed al-Guindi et d'un autre militant tué par balle lors d'une récente manifestation. "Obtenir justice pour eux, ou mourir comme eux", a scandé la foule.

(AFP, via Le Point)

 

Plus : http://www.lepoint.fr/monde/egypte-le-deces-d-un-militant-relance-les-appels-a-une-reforme-de-la-police-04-02-2013-1623747_24.php

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Le président égyptien Morsi est affaibli par les violences policières

Le président égyptien Morsi est affaibli par les violences policières | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Les images du passage à tabac d'un manifestant, vendredi 1er février, ont provoqué un tollé dans l'opinion.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Extraits

 

A aucun moment, le chef de l'Etat n'a mis en cause la police dans les affrontements qui ont causé la mort de 46 personnes. Il s'était même cantonné àtweeter  ses condoléances aux familles. "Comme d'habitude, son discours arrive trop tard, une fois qu'il est acculé. Et, au lieu d'accéder à quelques demandes du peuple, il fait un discours autoritaire où il apparaît comme un voleur qui veut s'accaparer  le pouvoir", commente Rani Moustapha, un Egyptien de 39 ans. (...)

Nombreux ne voient en lui que la marionnette des Frères musulmans. "La façon dont il agit, dont il se comporte, on sent que ça ne vient pas de lui. On sent qu'il n'est pas à l'aise. Il représente le "guide" des Frères, Mohamed Badie, pas lui-même", assure Rani Moustapha. Son adresse, le 4 décembre 2012, à ses"soutiens" de la confrérie venus manifester  devant le palais présidentiel, concurremment aux marches de l'opposition, a été vue comme un grave faux pas. Qu'il s'est bien gardé de reproduire .


Plus : http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2013/02/04/le-president-egyptien-morsi-est-affaibli-par-les-violences-policieres_1826653_3212.html

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Reforming the police is the solution, not emergency law, by Khaled Fahmy

President Morsi, his group and government, have failed to resolve Egypt's present crisis, and have deepened it. And while the opposition flounders, only the youth of the revolution can be relied upon

Egypt-actus's insight:

The many protests that erupted across the country since then until today have proven that large sectors of Egyptians are fed up, not only with State Security policies but also police conduct that was commonplace under Mubarak’s rule and has not changed after the revolution.

This includes abuse of power by police officers; a degrading manner in dealing with citizens on the street and in police stations; recruiting thousands of dangerous criminals to work with them as guides; rampant torture in police stations and holding cells everywhere in the country, not only of the enemies of the previous regime (mostly Islamists) but also of suspects in ordinary criminal cases. This even resulted in death in many cases.

Over the past two years, there have been many articles and studies demanding an end to these violations, as well as reforming the police sector. These includes suggestions to change the unified uniform, choose a civilian to serve as minister of interior, not a police officer, review how officers are trained, change Police Academy curricula and demilitarise it. Also, developing new mechanisms for civilian oversight of this sensitive apparatus, and subjecting it to supervision by parliament and the Public Prosecutor’s Office.

Voices have gone hoarse stressing the importance of this issue, how it’s a balancing force and how neglecting to reform it would hinder the recovery of the judiciary’s stature as well as the economy. There have also been many warnings that if definitive steps are not taken quickly to reform this apparatus, it is likely that the peaceful character of the revolution would fade and it would take a violent and bloody turn.

Despite these many calls, diagnoses and proposed cures, those in power — starting with the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces and ending with Muslim Brotherhood rule — did not give this issue the attention it deserves, leading to the explosive situation we live today.

 

More : http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/63847.aspx

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Francoise Autier's comment, February 4, 2013 2:00 AM
quel gachis !!!!!
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Prosecution questions beaten man over video

Prosecution questions beaten man over video | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

An Egyptian prosecutor questioned on Sunday Hamada Saber over a video that sparked fury over the weekend especially among opposition forces who condemned the use of violence against protesters. 

Local satellite channels and international media had aired footage of an Egyptian man who was seemingly being attacked, dragged and stripped naked by riot police at a Friday protest by the presidential palace. 

Saber, 48, and his wife appeared on national television at a police hospital a day after the attack and claimed that protesters, not riot police, assaulted and stripped him in search for his money. 

As suspicions that the man and his wife were threatened to falsely testify started rising, Saber's family members, including his daughter, started coming forward to the media and confirming that he was in fact threatened to not blame the police for the attack.

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya  
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Un Egyptien battu par la police accuse les manifestants

Un Egyptien qu'une vidéo montre nu, battu par des policiers et entraîné de force dans un véhicule des forces de l'ordre a rejeté la responsabilité de l'incident sur les manifestants hostiles au gouvernement dimanche à la télévision d'Etat.

 

Hamada Saber, un homme de 48 ans dont les images ont suscité un tollé en Egypte et enflammé les rangs de l'opposition dans un climat de tension déjà grand, après huit jours de manifestations qui ont fait près de 60 morts, est apparu allongé sur un lit d'hôpital, accusant des manifestants de l'avoir volé et dépouillé de ses vêtements.

 

Hamada Saber a déclaré qu'il était tombé lors de heurts entre manifestants et policiers et qu'il avait été encerclé et agressé par des manifestants.

"Ils ont pris mes vêtements, peut-être qu'ils cherchaient de l'argent dans mes poches. Puis quelqu'un a crié: 'ce n'est pas un soldat, c'est un vieil homme et vous allez le tuer'."

 

"Les soldats m'ont couru après. J'avais peur d'eux mais ils disaient: 'nous n'allons pas te frapper'. Je jure devant Dieu que c'est ce qui s'est produit", a-t-il ajouté.

 

Samedi, le bureau du procureur avait diffusé un communiqué affirmant que Saber avait démenti avoir été frappé par la police. L'opposition avait alors soupçonné les autorités de l'avoir intimidé pour dédouaner les forces de l'ordre.

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Presidency : Dragging protester is an individual act

Presidency : Dragging protester is an individual act | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Egypt's presidency said on Saturday that it had been following the unfortunate events which occurred in front of the presidential palace on Friday. It stressed that the shocking video which depicts how some police officers deal with the protesters does not consist with human rights.

Footage of a number of policemen brutally beating, stripping and dragging one of the protesters near the presidential palace was widely spread on satellite channels and the internet.

The presidency posted a statement on its official page confirming its keenness on guaranteeing the rights of citizens, which prohibits torturing or terrorizing or inflicting physical or psychological harm upon him.

The presidency praised the reaction of the Ministry of the Interior regarding the video, which confirmed that what happened was an individual act that does not reflect in any way the doctrine of the police.

"It is not acceptable to bid on individual errors which are denounced by everyone in order to justify the aggression on state enterprises or adopt violence and vandalism rather than peaceful expression of opinion," said the presidency.

The presidency added that "there will be an immediate investigation into the incident. The findings will be announced to the public in full transparency to achieve the demands of the glorious revolution of January 25."

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya  
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Interior Ministry expresses regret after beating, stripping protester

Interior Ministry expresses regret after beating, stripping protester | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Interior Ministry said Friday evening that it regrets the stripping and beating of a protester earlier in the day during clashes in front of Ettehadiya Palace.

 

Security forces dragged the protester through the streets, stripped him naked and beat him with batons before forcing him into an armored vehicle. The attack, which was captured by Al-Hayat satellite channel TV cameras, came amid vlashes between security forces and opponents of President Mohamed Morsy's rule in front of the palace.

 

 

 

In a press statement, the ministry described the incident as an “individual act” that does not represent police or security forces on the whole, describing them as making every effort "to protect the nation's security and stability, and sacrifice their lives for the security of the citizen.”

 

The statement added that an investigation is underway and that it would announce its findings to the public.

 

The ministry also claimed that it would not cover up any mistakes, and said that its role was to protect human rights and freedom after the 25 January revolution. (Al-Masry Al-Youm, via Egypt.com)

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Égypte: la police agira avec ''fermeté''

Égypte: la police agira avec ''fermeté'' | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Flash : 

La présidence égyptienne  a averti aujourd'hui que les forces de sécurité allaient agir "avec la plus grande fermeté" pour protéger les bâtiments publics, après de violents heurts avec des manifestants près du palais présidentiel au Caire.

"Les forces de sécurité vont agir avec la plus grande fermeté pour appliquer la loi et protéger les bâtiments publics", annonce la présidence dans un communiqué publié sur sa page Facebook, alors que les forces de l'ordre tentaient de disperser des manifestants lançant des cocktails molotov près du palais.
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Arrestation de 3 malfrats dans les alentours de l'hôtel Semiramis

Arrestation de 3 malfrats dans les alentours de l'hôtel Semiramis | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Les services de sécurité du Caire ont arrêté 3 hommes armés qui avaient attaqué et tiré sur les forces de la police dans les environs de l’hôtel Semiramis Intercontinental.

 

Les 3 malfrats étaient en possession de cartouches, d’armes blanches, de masques noirs et utilisaient une moto sans plaques d’immatriculation. 1 des malfrats était recherché pour d’autres délits et le 2ème avait déjà fait de la prison.

 

ألقت الأجهزة الأمنية بمديرية أمن القاهرة القبض على 3 مسلحين لقيامهم بالتعدى على قوات

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Amnesty reveals excessive use of force by Egyptian security forces

Amnesty reveals excessive use of force by Egyptian security forces | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Eyewitness accounts collected by Amnesty International in Egypt point to the unnecessary use of lethal force by security forces during a weekend of clashes with demonstrators.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Three days of violence in Egypt led to the deaths of at least 45 people, and left more than a 1,000 injured. 


A researcher from Amnesty International investigating killings in Suez collected disturbing eyewitness accounts of excessive force. These include incidents where the security forces used force when it was not necessary to protect life and where protestors did not pose an imminent threat. 


Colm O’Gorman, Executive Director of Amnesty International Ireland, said: “The first protestors to die by police bullets in the ‘25 January Revolution’ were in Suez. It is tragic that exactly two years later not only has nobody been punished for their deaths, but more protestors have been unlawfully killed by security forces. 


“Protests are continuing in Egypt to commemorate the ‘25 January Revolution’. The Egyptian authorities must issue clear orders to the security forces to avoid unnecessary or excessive force. Those responsible for these unlawful killings must be brought to justice.


“The use of violence by some protesters does not give a blank cheque to the police to shoot and beat protesters. All this comes against the backdrop of decades in which the security forces have operated above the law – in some cases getting away with murder.” 


Suez

At least nine people, including one member of the security forces, died in Suez on the evening of 25 January. 


Protestors told Amnesty International that shortly after thousands of women, men and children concluded a march to Suez’s security directorate, security forces fired tear gas. The security forces were reportedly attempting to prevent protestors from storming the building. 


Violence escalated after a member of the security forces, believed to be a conscript with the riot police, was seriously injured - hit in the neck by a flare believed to have been fired by a protester. 


Protestors told Amnesty International that at that point, riot police “panicked” and started shooting at random and chasing fleeing protestors, leading to eight further deaths, according to medical sources, mostly in the vicinity of the nearby Governorate Building.   


Forensic examination

On 26 January, forensic pathologists arrived in Suez from Cairo to conduct post-mortem examinations in the presence of members of the military prosecution. 


The head of forensics Ihsan Kamil Georges was quoted on the website of the state Al-Ahram newspaper as saying Suez protestors were shot by live ammunition, in some instances at close range and from behind. 


Amnesty International is gathering testimony on the use of unnecessary and excessive use of force by security forces as the unrest continues: 

Ahmed Fawzi told Amnesty International that he was driving his motorcycle, when his friend, 16 year-old Mostafa Mohamed Aid sitting behind him, was fatally shot in the kidney; Mahmoud Nabil, 25, was shot in his car at the seafront away from the confrontations between police and protesters, local activists in Suez said;Amnesty International also examined blood stains at the entrance of a building on “Martyrs’ Street” far from the Governorate Building, where one of the protestors was shot, according to local residents;Protesters told Amnesty International that members of the security forces chased them into the Suez General Hospital at around 22:00 firing randomly.

Port Said clashes

On 26 January, violent clashes also erupted in Port Said in reaction to a verdict by a court in Cairo referring the files of 21 defendants accused of responsibility for the deaths of 73 people during a football match to the Grand Mufti for ratification of their death sentences. 


According to the Port Said Health Directorate, some 31 people died and 322 were injured in the wake of the violence on 26 January. At least two members of the security forces were among the dead. 


According to the directorate, a further five people were killed and 536 people injured on 27 January during funeral processions, when unknown assailants opened fire.  Local residents estimate the death toll to be higher. Amnesty International reported more bodies arriving at the morgue late in the afternoon on 28 January. 


Curfew

On 27 January, President Morsi announced a month-long state of emergency and imposed a curfew in the provinces of Suez, Ismailia and Port Said. 


President Morsi stated that he was prepared to take further measures, and would not hesitate to do “much more for the sake of Egypt.” The army have also been deployed to restore order. 


Amnesty International has urged the Egyptian authorities to consider whether less intrusive measures would be better suited to restore order.

 
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