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Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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AUC roundtable discusses Egyptian women

AUC roundtable discusses Egyptian women | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A group of American University in Cairo (AUC) professors agreed that women’s status in Egypt hasn’t deteriorated much since Islamists’ took power.

In a roundtable held on Tuesday at the AUC, political science professor Rabab El-Mahdi stated that Egyptians’ frustration stems from the fact that women’s status didn’t improve after the 25 January Revolution.

“The revolution broke out because the people weren’t happy with a lot of things in the country, women’s status included,” El-Mahdi said.

The issue of sexual harassment was widely discussed during the roundtable. Amina Elbendary, assistant professor of Arab and Islamic civilization, stated that sexual harassment is generally a trial to outcast women from the public sphere. El-Mahdi said that sexual harassment needs to be addressed both as a political as well as social tool.

“Sexual terrorisation is a popular tool used during wars and revolutions to scare women,” said Saeed Sadek, a political psychologist. “The reason why it has proliferated lately is that women who never took to the streets in the past are now eager to join protests.”

ElBendary stated that the fact that women are more likely to admit to having been sexually harassed or assaulted, and face their harassers is a positive outcome of the 2011 Revolution.

Sadek blamed the increased prevalence of harassment on the lack of punishment against the harassers. El-Mahdi added that the Ministry of Interior is incapable of repressing harassment since it has been practicing it on citizens for a very long time. (...)

The roundtable participants also discussed the status of women in the new constitution and whether it improved when compared to previous constitutions. Sadek stated that the new constitution failed to reflect the prevailing revolutionary trends in society.

“The revolutionary symbols, especially the female revolutionaries, were absent from the constitution-drafting scene,” said Hani Henry, AUC associate professor and graduate advisor.

El-Mahdi stated that constitutions are not an indicator to measure women’s status in society. “Most constitutions worldwide lack the articles we were looking for in regards to women’s rights,” El-Mahdi said. She added that women’s status stems from the society’s culture and not from constitutions.

“Nevertheless, this constitution, like its predecessors, lacked the gender entry which stresses equal rights of men and women,” El-Mahdi said. She said that the issue has nothing to do with women’s poor representation in the Constituent Assembly which drafted the constitution. “Some women’s mentality is even more masculine than men’s.”

The same approach was adopted when discussing women’s representation in parliament. Elbendary said that when linking women’s status to parliament, the focus shouldn’t be the number of women inside parliament, but their actions. (Daily news Egypt)

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/19/auc-roundtable-discusses-egyptian-women/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+DailyNewsEgypt+%28Daily+News+Egypt%29

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Égypte : les agressions contre les femmes se multiplient

Égypte : les agressions contre les femmes se multiplient | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

VIDEO

 

Les agressions sexuelles contre les femmes en Égypte auraient augmenté depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir des islamistes. Certains évoquent même la présence lors des rassemblements anti-Morsi de bandes organisées payées pour violer les manifestantes. Sur la place Tahrir au Caire, des gardes du corps tentent d’assurer leur protection, mais ils sont en nombre insuffisants.

Pour protester contre cette insécurité grandissante, des féministes promettent des actions coup de poing : ‘‘Si les Frères Musulmans ne quittent pas le pouvoir, nous les Égyptiennes, promettons de manifester nues dans les rues. Nous y resterons jusqu’au départ de Morsi”, lance une femme dans une vidéo postée sur Youtube.

Un rapport, publié début février par Amnesty International, avait enregistré un nombre record d’agressions sexuelles lors des manifestations anti-Morsi. Dans ce contexte, des femmes se sont vu proposer des cours d’auto-défense, tandis que d’autres descendent désormais dans la rue munies d’un couteau. (Euronews)

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Graffiti campaigns bring women and children into street art

Graffiti campaigns bring women and children into street art | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It was a landmark day when prominent women’s rights activist Doria Shafiq bravely led a march of 1,500 women to storm the gates of Parliament on 19 February 1951. After several hours of unrelenting protest, Shafiq was finally received inside the office, where the council agreed to consider the demands of Egyptian women.

Along with her predecessors, including Hoda Shaarawi, Nabawiya Moussa and Ceza Nabarawi, Shafiq remains one of the leading pioneers of the women’s liberation movement in Egypt during the early 20th century. Her march to Parliament later led to the inclusion of women’s suffrage in the 1956 Constitution.

But, despite her many feats, Shafiq is likely to be forgotten in the minds of future generations in Egypt.

Al-Masry Al-Youm reported in January that the 2013–2014 editions of National Education textbooks had been edited to delete the picture of Doriya Shafiq and pictures of those killed during the 25 January revolution. The article also noted that Shafiq’s image was removed from a high-school textbook because she was not veiled.

But, as the subversion of Egyptian women continues, local human rights activists have become more creative in their fight for women’s equality, representation and rights.

Seen through local street art collectives like Noon El Neswa, the Mona Lisa Brigades and various independent efforts, a new wave of gender-sensitive street art and visual campaigns seeks to challenge the low status of Egyptian women by painting them in a positive light.

“They are already deleting female activists from our history books,” says Shady Khalil, the co-founder of Noon El Neswa, a gender-sensitive street art collective. “In order to help reverse the effects of this and many other attacks on women’s rights, we have been creating graffiti campaigns with the purpose of reclaiming women’s rightful position in public spaces.” ( Maha ElNabawi/Egypt independent)

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/graffiti-campaigns-bring-women-and-children-street-art

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Egypt's treatment of women is intolerabe

Egypt's treatment of women is intolerabe | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

When I walk into Tahrir Square alone these days, carrying my notebook, I try to remain calm, act like I belong and move with the crowds. If you seem scared or intimidated, they smell your fear.

Like other female reporters, I have grown accustomed to being constantly on guard while doing my job. But that can't guarantee safety. Sexual assaults on women protesters -- and journalists -- have become common in Cairo.

 

In late January, the United Nations strongly urged the Egyptian government to act, saying it had received 25 reports of assaults on women in Tahrir Square in a single week -- 19 of them in a single day. One young woman was hospitalized with lacerations after being raped with a sharp object. Witnesses described bite marks all over the woman's body. (...)

 

Last week, a report from Amnesty International concluded that the government's failure to pursue aggressively perpetrators of the harassment "has fueled violent attacks against women in the vicinity of Tahrir Square."(..)

 

Intellectually, I know that such men are acting out against women because they view us as weaker. But when I'm alone, I sometimes wonder: "Did I do something subconsciously to deserve their harassment?" That is how it works with abuse.

 

I remind myself often that I'm a journalist. My job is not only to hear but to listen. As an Egyptian woman, I know that a renaissance boils beneath the surface. Despite violence and repression, women are half the population, and they are mobilizing. (...)

 

When the Egyptian uprising began, it appeared that society would be more open to women's advancement and to discussing the roots of violence against women. But we are still far from that point. (...)

Egypt-actus's insight:

Since Islamist President Mohamed Morsi came into power last June, many women have started to feel that their core freedoms could be threatened by political Islam, and this has spurred working women, single mothers, activists and artists to break taboos and push society's boundaries (...)

 

Growing protests of discontent, led by women of all ages and backgrounds, have swept across the nation from the Mediterranean city of Alexandria to Morsi's palace walls.

 

The world got a glimpse of the struggle Egyptian women face in December 2012, when a brave girl was stripped of her veil and clothes -- down to her blue bra -- in the middle of Tahrir Square. This was done not by simple ruffians but by Egyptian soldiers during a protest demanding an end to military rule after Hosni Mubarak's ouster.

 

More on: http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/191473461.html

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Interview: Women's rights in Egypt "at stake" amid protests, assaults: UN official

Interview: Women's rights in Egypt "at stake" amid protests, assaults: UN official | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

While protests in Egypt continue and sexual assaults against women have risen to alarming levels, Egyptian women continue to fight for their individual freedoms, a UN Women official told Xinhua in a recent interview.

Maya Morsy, UN Women's country coordinator for Egypt, said from Cairo in a phone interview that "there is a backlash; the women's agenda in Egypt is at stake."

 

Morsy made the remarks as UN officials are taking a stance against violence against women as part of the "One Billion Rising. " The One Billion Rising campaign, sponsored by the V-day Organization, seeks to mobilize men and women around the world on Valentine's Day -- observed annually in various countries on Feb. 14 -- to raise their voices to stop violence against women and girls, including rape, battery, incest, female genital mutilation (FGM), and sex slavery.

 

Two years ago, a revolution toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak, but there has been a resurgence of protests against current President Mohamed Morsi's government. The protests peaked on Jan. 25, the second anniversary of the 2011 unrest, and also brought a wave of violent sexual assaults against women, reports said.

 

Women have not hesitated to speak out against the violence, even in the tenuous political climate, Morsy said, adding that they have been increasingly talking about their experiences in public ways, such as on widely viewed television shows that have made their experiences hard to dismiss.

 

More on:http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2013-02/15/c_132169086.htm

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Egypt’s Sexual Terrorism

Egypt’s Sexual Terrorism | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

With reports of mob attacks and gang rape growing alarmingly common in Egypt, angry protesters demonstrated in Cairo on Tuesday, calling for urgently needed protection and harsher punishment of perpetrators of sexual assault.

 

 

Though the protest in Cairo’s Talaat Harb Square was peaceful, the slogans were hard-hitting. One banner displayed a warning that rhymed in Arabic: “Sexual assault doesn’t pay. Try again—we’ll cut your hand.”

 

Concurrent with the Cairo protest, solidarity demonstrations were held in cities around the world, including Amman, Copenhagen, Melbourne, Washington, D.C. and London to denounce the rise of “sexual terrorism”  in Egypt.

 

“There is a virus afflicting the brains of some of these men,” said Karima El Gharib, 35, a political activist who attended Tuesday’s protest in Cairo. “These sick people think that if they scare the women, we will stop our men from going to the protests. We are the country’s women: your sister, your mother. Try and say ‘boo’ to us now and we will destroy you!”

 

Last month, the United Nations issued a statement expressing “deep concern” after more than two dozen women reported they had been sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square—in some cases, with extraordinary violence—during demonstrations marking the two-year anniversary of the Egyptian revolution.

 

The activists, though, know that raising awareness of the issue is an uphill battle.

 

More on: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/13/egypt-s-sexual-terrorism.html

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Egypte - Des femmes élèvent la voix contre les agressions sexuelles

Des Egyptiens, hommes et femmes, sont de nouveau descendus dans la rue mardi pour exiger la fin des violences sexuelles contre les femmes en Egypte, qui se sont multipliées ces derniers mois dans le centre du Caire.

"La voix de la femme est une révolution", ont scandé les manifestants, en agitant des drapeaux marqués du visage d'icônes féminines égyptiennes.

Ce rassemblement est le dernier d'une série d'actions demandant la fin de la culture d'impunité vis-à-vis des agressions sexuelles commises par des groupes d'hommes sur la place Tahrir et dans ses environs.

Ces attaques sont "une arme dans l'actuel conflit politique", a dit une manifestante, Mayar Abdel Aziz, en accusant "les opposants à la liberté" d'en être les auteurs.

Plus: http://www.maghrebemergent.info/actualite/fil-maghreb/21113-egypte-des-femmes-elevent-la-voix-contre-les-agressions-sexuelles.html

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The courage of the vigilante feminists is contagious

The courage of the vigilante feminists is contagious | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

'I'm sick of being ashamed." Three days ago, an anti-harassment activist said those words to me in a flat above Cairo's Tahrir square, as she pulled on her makeshift uniform ready to protect women on the protest lines from being raped in the street. Only days before, I'd heard exactly the same words from pro-choice organisers in Dublin, where I travelled to report on the feminist fight to legalise abortion in Ireland. I had thought that I was covering two separate stories – so why were two women from different countries and backgrounds repeating the same mantra against fear, and against shame?

From India to Ireland to Egypt, women are on the streets, on the airwaves, on the internet, getting organised and getting angry. They're co-ordinating in their communities to combat sexual violence and taking a stand against archaic sexist legislation; they're challenging harassment and rape culture. Across the world, women who are sick and tired of shame and fear are fighting back in unprecedented ways. (...)

 

Sexism often functions as a pressure-release valve in times of social unrest – and when it does, it takes different forms, depending on local values. Right now, in Egypt, it's groping, heckling and mob attacks(...)

 

Like the Arab spring and Occupy in 2011, local movements with no apparent connection to one another are exchanging information and taking courage from one another's struggles. The fight against misogyny is spreading online and via networks of solidarity and trust that develop rapidly, outside the traditional channels. I met Swedish and Iranian feminist activists in Dublin, and British feminist activists in Cairo, and have seen live information about the women's marches in Egypt spread quickly through chains of activists from South Africa to the American Deep South. Men and boys, too, are involved as allies – not in large numbers, but in numbers large enough to make their presence impossible to overlook. (...)

 

What's fascinating about these new feminist movements is their independence. They're developing organically, outside the well-worn circuit of NGOs, government lobbying and quiet petition-signing that has been the proper format for feminist activism for more than two decades. As if on some secret signal, women and their allies across the world have expressed a collective lack of faith in governments and police forces to deal with endemic sexism (...)

 

More on: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/feb/13/new-feminism-defying-shame

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London Seminar: Pith Helmets and Petticoats: Women in 19th Century Egyp

London Seminar: Pith Helmets and Petticoats: Women in 19th Century Egyp | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Time and Place

Start Time: Saturday, 23rd February 2013, 11:00 am
End Time: Saturday, 23rd February 2013, 4:00 pm
Location: The Egypt Exploration Society
Street: 3 Doughty Mews
City/Town: London, WC1N 2PG

Egypt-actus's insight:
Description

This seminar will examine the lives and work of a number of women who worked, lived and wrote about Egypt and Egyptology, during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The day will comprise the following speakers and topics:

Dr Helene Virenque: As an archaeologist working on behalf of the Egypt Exploration Fund, the Swiss scholar Edouard Naville (1844-1926) headed numerous fieldwork projects in Lower and Upper Egypt. By his side was his wife Marguerite (1852-1930) who supported him in everyday life as well as through many technical aspects such as the drawings of his famous Memoirs or the exacting process of the publications. This seminar will bring the opportunity to mention new unpublished archival material relating to this woman, offspring of a noble family, who dedicated her life to the long career of her famous husband.

Dr Silvia Einaudi: Amalia Sola Nizzoli (1805-1841/49?) arrived in Egypt as a teenager in 1819, together with her family, in order to join her uncle Filiberto Marucchi who was chief physician to the Defterdar Bey, a high official of the Viceroy Mohammed Ali. Thanks to her marriage to the diplomat and antiquities merchant Giuseppe Nizzoli, Amalia entered European and Egyptian society, and in 1825 she even directed archaeological excavations in Saqqara on behalf of her husband, becoming a female pioneer in this field. During her long stay in Egypt (1819-1828), she wrote her Memories, in which a particular interest for the condition of the Egyptian women is shown. 

Henrietta McCall: If Katharine Woolley was the inspiration for Louise Leidner in Agatha Christie's Murder in Mesopotamia, recent research has revealed that life can be even stranger than fiction. Her first husband was said to have shot himself through the head on the steps of the Great Pyramid during their honeymoon, while her second, Sir Leonard Woolley, had to agree to a marriage in name only. Henrietta McCall will be talking about the rumours which have distorted the memory of this enigmatic woman and the real contribution she made to Middle Eastern archaeology and to the successful career of Leonard Woolley.
She will also talk briefly about why Agatha Christie travelled to the Middle East, became involved in archaeology, and the books Christie wrote which reflected her love of Mesopotamia and its ancient sites. 

Dr Joanna Kyffin: Amelia B. Edwards was the archetypal Victorian lady, an accomplished musician and artist, with a number of novels to her name and a taste for adventure, when she first arrived in Egypt in 1873. Her passion for the country led her to found the Egypt Exploration Fund, to preserve the monuments and explore the history of the ancient civilisation of Egypt. Her influence and founding principles still guide the Society today, and this talk will explore her life and work in the context of the EES's current research.

 

More : http://www.ees.ac.uk/events/index/182.html

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We will not abandon Tahrir nor any other square of the world! | redmed.org

We will not abandon Tahrir nor any other square of the world! | redmed.org | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

These attacks targeting women do not raise fear, they cultivate anger. Rather than abandoning the streets, Egyptian women have been organizing demonstrations for days. As women militants of the Revolutionary Workers’ Party (DIP), we salute the courage of the revolutionary women of Egypt. And we call women around the world to fight against sexual harassment and rape!

 

A woman activist who was on Tahrir square to celebrate the anniversary of the Egyptian revolution of 25 January and to protest the Morsi regime explains that these words uttered by one of the assailants during the  group sexual harassment she was subjected to have been engraved forever in her mind.  No other words could make it clearer that the actual aim of these attacks, ever increasing in numbers, is to deter women from taking part in protests and exclude them from politics. In a nutshell, to tear them away from the revolution!

 

During the protests of 25th January 19 sexual harassment incidents were reported. It is not difficult to imagine that the number of attacks that went unreported would be much higher. These acts were extended from verbal abuse to physical harassment as women, regardless of their age, had their clothes torn, some of them were stabbed while others got raped. Considering the way the attacks were organised, assertions that this is the work of organized paid gangs seem to have valid grounds.   

Although, the attacks on women have been on the rise recently, this is not the first time that such things have happened in Egypt. Our memory still recalls the violent scenes of a woman activist being dragged on the street half-naked by soldiers during the  demonstrations against the Supreme Council  of the Armed Forces some time after the fall of Mubarak.

 

More on: http://redmed.org/article/we-will-not-abandon-tahrir-nor-any-other-square-world

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Women to show solidarity for Egypt in face of sexual violence

Women to show solidarity for Egypt in face of sexual violence | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Women and activists across the globe are set for a global day of protest on Tuesday in an effort to help publicize and make known the horrific plight of women protesters in Egypt after numerous mob sexual attacks have been reported in Egypt over the past month, highlighting the growing pandemic of sexual assaults against female protesters.

Dubbed “Global Protest Feb. 12” activists are hopeful that it will begin to send a message to the Egyptian government that more action is needed to combat this rising and daily affliction of the North African country’s society.

Numerous women’s rights organizations have already announced their participation, which will see activists in over 30 cities across the globe take to Egyptian consulates and embassies as well as demonstrations in Egypt to voice their frustration at the rising violence directed toward women in the country while protesting. (Joseph Mayton)

 

More : http://bikyanews.com/85365/women-to-show-solidarity-for-egypt-in-face-of-sexual-violence/

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Demands for release of women activists - Egypt

Demands for release of women activists - Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Opposition groups, political parties and initiatives demanded on Monday the release of two women activists who were arrested on Friday in the latest presidential palace clashes.

Nermeen Hussien and Soheir Mahmoud are detained on charges of vandalism and assaulting security forces.

The two activists were volunteer medics who offered aid to the protesters wounded near the presidential palace.

They are held for four days pending investigations, along with seven other activists.

Nermeen Hussein is the Admin of the Facebook page ‘So, we made a revolution’ which was also administrated by Mohamed Gaber Salah (known as Jika) who had been killed in violent protests in November.

A statement signed by opposition groups condemned not revealing the place where the activists were detained.

"This prosecution of activists represents a continuation of the policies of the former regime of oppression," said the statement.

The statement also denounced the targeting of women and trying to exclude them from the political scene.

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya  
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Women's 'Legitimate dreams' come true in Egyptian film

Women's 'Legitimate dreams' come true in Egyptian film | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Legitimate Dreams, a film produced by the Social Fund for Development (SFD) in partnership with the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) present a journey through the various governorates of Egypt during which six success stories of women entrepreneurs named: Azza, Maha, Nanees, Mona, Magda, and Thanaa are presented.

The camera moves from Cairo to Giza, then Alexandria, passes by Borg Al-Arab, continues to Minya and to Suez.

Legitimate Dreams shows genuine success stories and the limitless ambition of Egyptian women.  The viewer looks into the lives and enterprises of each woman and watches their dreams become reality as they manage their enterprises.

The film shows each woman succeeded in a different field. One of the women entrepreneurs opened a furniture factory, reflecting Egyptian taste and style; another woman was interested in bedding embroidery. Women entrepreneurs also excelled in other sectors such as: aromatic oils, the fertilizers industry or even fish farming (...)

Legitimate Dreams is part of the partnership between the SFD and UN Women to empower Egyptian women economically and help them live their dreams through economic enterprises.

 

More on: http://www.albawaba.com/entertainment/legitimate-dreams-egypt-469532

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Female group accuses Islamist TV channel of defamation

Female group accuses Islamist TV channel of defamation | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Egyptian Female Lawyers Initiative submitted a complaint to the Public Prosecution in Cairo on Tuesday against the owner of satellite TV channel al-Umma.

According to the initiative, Shiekh Ahmed Mohamed Mahmoud Abdallah, known as Shiekh Abu Islam, insulted female protesters on air by claiming that their goal going to protests was to be sexually harassed.

The group also called for protests at the Public Prosecution building on Wednesday to condemn Abu Islam's remarks.

Khaled Abu Kreisha, the initiative's legal adviser, said his 26 female clients were demanding an investigation into Abu Islam's comments. The women had taken part in the protest dubbed "The street is ours" to oppose a recent rash of violent sexual assaults on female protesters and activists in and around Tahrir Square.

The group's complaint includes a recording of Abu Islam making the comments. This is not the first time Abu Salam was in the news. He was previously accused of desecrating the Bible during the September 2012 US Embassy protests.

Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm (Egypt independent)

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HarassMap battles sexual harassment in Egypt and beyond

HarassMap battles sexual harassment in Egypt and beyond | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It’s a long way from Cairo (population 17 million) to rural Hughesville, Pa. (population 2,000). But for Rebecca Chiao, not so much a leap as a logical step.

“I just had to get off the farm,” says the determined, dark-eyed 36-year-old. “I wanted it badly.”

 

So badly that she took a graduate degree in economics and international development to Egypt’s seething capital, then in the grip of president Hosni Mubarak: “I took a volunteer job for three weeks, and I stayed for 4 ½ years.”

 

Last month Chiao was sitting in a Toronto hotel café, to talk about her rapidly-growing organization HarassMap, a project to battle sexual harassment in Egypt and beyond. In less than three years she has become the voice of Egypt’s once silently outraged women, who won the revolt against Mubarak, but lost the sexual revolution.

 

“It has been a bit overwhelming,” Chiao admits with a ready chuckle. “Everything has happened so fast.” (...) Her calm demeanour cracked under daily harassment by men, and even young boys. The attacks are shocking, but not entirely surprising, says Chiao.

 

“At first I thought it might be my fault,” she said. “Or just part of being a woman in Cairo. We talked about it with our girlfriends, but it didn’t go beyond that.” But working at the Egyptian Centre for Women’s Rights, she heard ever more appalling stories from colleagues. (...)

 

HarassMap has gone from a four-woman effort to counsel and connect sexually harassed women through cellphones and social media, to a formidable force that sends brigades of anti-misogynist crusaders to promote change in streets and neighbourhoods where attacks were once tolerated as commonplace.

 

Working with friends Engy Ghozlan, Sawsan Gad and Amel Fahmy, Chiao found technical advice on how to connect with digital and social media to allow harassed women to report incidents from their cellphones, and get advice on counselling, medical and legal help: a cyber safety net for those who felt helpless and isolated. They also pinpointed the places where the harassment took place and created a virtual map of sexual attacks.

 

With support from Canada’s International Development Research Centre, they were off and running. Volunteers signed up to enter neighbourhood hot spots and do teach-ins with local shopkeepers, taxi drivers and residents.

 

“Surprisingly, they supported us,” she said. “They knew it was wrong and they wanted to help.” As a sign of success, half their volunteers are now men.

Women in 19 countries have contacted Chiao to learn HarassMap’s methods. It’s a welcome new direction, but an added burden of work.

 
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Egypte: Cheikh d'Al Azhar - " La femme arabe souffre encore des traditions "

Egypte: Cheikh d'Al Azhar - " La femme arabe souffre encore des traditions " | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Lors de son entretien avec le président du Parlement arabe Ahmed Al Garawan et la délégation qui l'accompagne, le Grand Imam d'Al Azhar, Cheikh Al Azhar a affirmé que le rôle d'Al Azhar représente à réaliser la paix entre tous les égyptiens musulmans et coptes.

Et d'ajouter, Cheikh Al Azhar a indiqué que le message d'Al Azhar s'accorde avec tel du Parlement arabe sur les deux nivaux arabe et islamique.

 

Le Grand Imam a souligné qu'il ya beaucoup de défis font face au Parlement arabe en tête le problème de la femme arabe, et de la libérer de certaines traditions et habitudes qui vit encore avec nous comme d'habitudes et qui remontent à l'ère de l'avant Islam

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Viols en Egypte: la faute aux femmes ? - RTBF Monde

Viols en Egypte: la faute aux femmes ? - RTBF Monde | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Les femmes attirent parfois le viol en se mettant dans une situation qui en fait des objets de viol": tel est le propos tenu par un salafiste élu au Sénat égyptien. Et, selon le site d'information Bikyamasr, il témoigne d'un état d'esprit dominant dans cette assemblée où les courants politiques islamistes tiennent le haut du pavé.

 

Or, le viol et le harcèlement deviennent de véritables fléaux en Egypte. Lors des récentes manifestations, 24 femmes auraient été violées par des hommes déchaînés. "Personne ne fait quoi que ce soit pour lutter contre cette tendance", s'insurge un élu des frères musulmans, à quoi le site Bikyamasr répond que des ONG sont actives pour protéger les femmes des débordements, tout en pointant le caractère insidieux du message des religieux: accréditant l'idée que les femmes sont des proies faciles, ils recommandent ni plus ni moins qu'elles restent chez elles et ne se mêlent pas de manifester...

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Valérie Toranian's curator insight, February 25, 2013 11:05 AM

Les propos tenus par le Sénat sont inadmissibles.

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Les manifestantes de plus en plus agressées en Égypte

Les manifestantes de plus en plus agressées en Égypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Les Égyptiennes sont de plus en plus en colère alors qu'elles doivent composer avec une conséquence inattendue du printemps arabe: la multiplication des cas d'agressions sexuelles et l'incapacité des autorités à mettre fin à ce fléau.

Leur révolte est alimentée par les commentaires des islamistes, qui ont laissé entendre que les femmes allaient au devant des attaques en participant à des manifestations antigouvernementales mixtes.

Cette dénonciation des agressions contre les femmes survient alors que le pays traverse une période trouble. Même si la dernière vague de protestations contre le président Mohammed Morsi s'est calmée durant les derniers jours, les manifestations ont gagné en violence. Une minorité de contestataires a promis de renverser le gouvernement et la répression a été sanglante. Environ 70 personnes ont été tuées dans des affrontements entre les manifestants et les forces de l'ordre depuis le 25 janvier, deuxième anniversaire du soulèvement populaire ayant causé la chute de l'ancien président Hosni Moubarak

 

Plus: http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/International/2013/02/13/010-egypte-manif-agressions-sexuelles.shtml

 

 

 

 

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Francoise Autier's comment, February 14, 2013 1:12 AM
quelle honte, un gouvernement qui ne protege ni les femmes, ni le peuple doit partir !!!!
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Musical night to protest violence against women

Musical night to protest violence against women | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

An Egyptian women rights group called on all women who have been subjected to violence  to protest Thursday against violence with music, singing and dialogue.

The Appropriate Communication Techniques for Development Center (ACT) plans a celebration to end violence against women with the participation of women from all around the world in the Swiss Club of Giza district.

The event will be launched as an expression of resistance towards all forms of violence under the title "Billions of Women...Rise".

"We will be a voice for those who don't have any", said a statement by ACT demanding that all women raise their voices high against violence.

The statement added that even under pressure, women of Egypt will not resign public or political life.

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya  
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En Egypte, la colère des femmes contre le terrorisme sexuel

En Egypte, la colère des femmes contre le terrorisme sexuel | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Plusieurs centaines de militantes égyptiennes ont protesté mardi 12 février au soir au Caire « contre les pratiques de terrorisme sexuel » auxquelles les femmes sont soumises lors des manifestations de l’opposition. Des manifestations similaires ont eu lieu devant les ambassades égyptiennes dans 35 pays à travers le monde.

 

De notre correspondant au Caire, Alexandre Buccianti

C’est à l’occasion des manifestations de l’opposition lors de la commémoration de la révolution du 25 janvier que le harcèlement sexuel ciblé a éclaté au grand jour sur la place Tahrir.

 

Selon les témoins, une trentaine de femmes ont été isolées puis agressées par des bandes de jeunes gens disciplinés. Certaines des jeunes femmes dénudées à coup de canifs et de cutters ont été grièvement blessées et pénétrées. Des agressions qui se sont régulièrement répétées lors de toutes les manifestations de l’opposition.

 

Des groupes révolutionnaires ont accusé le pouvoir des Frères musulmans d’être, directement ou indirectement, à l’origine des agressions sexuelles. Des accusations que la confrérie a qualifiées de « ridicules ».

 

Plus: http://www.rfi.fr/moyen-orient/20130212-egypte-colere-femmes-contre-le-terrorisme-sexuel?ns_campaign=google_choix_redactions&ns_mchannel=editors_picks&ns_source=google_actualite&ns_linkname=moyen-orient.20130212-egypte-colere-femmes-contre-le-terrorisme-sexuel&ns_fee=0

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Egypt women raise their voice against sexual violence

Egypt women raise their voice against sexual violence | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian protesters took to the street again on Tuesday to demand an end to sexual violence, as campaigns against the repeated attacks in central Cairo pick up steam.

"A woman's voice is a revolution," the protesters -- both men and women-- shouted, brandishing large flags of female Egyptian icons.

Tuesday's protest is the latest in a series of action demanding an end to the culture of impunity, following harrowing reports of mob attacks in and around Tahrir Square.

The attacks are "a weapon in the ongoing political fight," said Mayar Abdel Aziz, blaming "opponents of freedom" for being behind them.(...)

"We used to be passive and not ask for our rights," before the revolution, Abdel Aziz told AFP.

The protesters are also furious over statements from members of the upper house of parliament which blamed the women for inviting attack.

 

"Women sometimes cause rape upon themselves by putting themselves in a position which makes them subject to rape," said Salafi deputy Adel Afifi, quoted by local media.(...)

 

"Harassment is a polite word. We need to call it sexual attack. It has even reached gang rape in Tahrir Square," she told AFP.

 

More on: http://www.emirates247.com/news/region/egypt-women-raise-their-voice-against-sexual-violence-2013-02-13-1.494872

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Égypte • Des manifestations internationales contre les violences faites aux femmes

Égypte • Des manifestations internationales contre les violences faites aux femmes | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

De nombreuses ONG, des associations féministes et le mouvement The Uprising Women in The Arab World, né avec les révolution arabes, ont lancé ces derniers jours un grand appel international à manifester ce 12 février. Ils protestent contre "le terrorisme sexuel" subi par les Égyptiennes pendant les rassemblements populaires contre le régime de Morsi. 

Les organisateurs espèrent que de nombreuses personnes se réuniront, ce mardi à 18h (à l'heure locale de chaque pays), devant les ambassades egyptiennes de plus de 24 villes à travers le monde, indique Ahram Online.  Des manifestations devraient se tenir à Rabat, Tunis, Amman, Copenhague, Bruxelles, Washington, Londres, Paris, Melbourne, Ramallah et Oslo. 

Au même moment, des associations féministes égyptiennes se réuniront place Tahrir, théâtre de nombreux abus, pour s'insurger contre ce fléau. Mais aussi contre le harcèlement au quotidien des Égyptiennes, ayant déclaré en 2010 en avoir été victimes à 83%. 

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TV5MONDE : Mobilisation internationale contre le harcèlement sexuel en Egypte

TV5MONDE : Mobilisation internationale contre le harcèlement sexuel en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Du Canada au Thaïlande, une trentaine de manifestations sont organisées mardi 12 février 2013 pour dénoncer les agressions sexuelles contre les femmes dans les rues d’Égypte, principalement au Caire où la Place Tahrir, lieu emblématique de toutes les manifestations est désormais aussi l'endroit où des femmes, croyantes ou non, journalistes ou activistes, célèbres ou pas, ont subi les assauts de ce combat quotidien. Deux ans après la chute d'Hosni Moubarak, à l'appel du mouvement "The uprising of women in the Arab world" des dizaines de manifestant(e)s sont attendu(e)s devant les ambassades et les consulats égyptiens dans des villes moyen-orientales, asiatiques, européennes ou américaines.  "Ne pas cacher les problèmes et réveiller les médias" - entretien avec Farah Barqawi, co-fondatrice de "The uprising of women in the Arab world"12.02.2013Propos recueillis par Thameen KheetanDes dizaines, et parfois des centaines, de personnes ont confirmé leur présence aux manifestations sur les réseaux sociaux. Est-ce que vous vous attendez à une telle participation dans la rue ?

Nous espérons que la participation sera à la hauteur du nombre des gens qui ont annoncé sur Facebook vouloir venir. On sait qu’il y en a qui confirment mais qui ne viennent finalement pas. Par contre, il y en a qui ne se sont pas enregistrés sur Facebook, mais qui viendront quand même. Donc il y aura probablement un équilibre.

Il y a des participants qui viendront en groupes organisés par des associations féministes. En général, on s’attend à ce qu’il y ait au moins 100 personnes dans chaque pays.


C’est la première fois que ce mouvement sort du territoire égyptien. Comment voyez-vous la réaction au niveau mondial ?

Très bien. Il n’y a pas que des associations qui ont répondu à notre appel, mais aussi des individus. Ces derniers ont pris l’initiative en lançant l’appel sur Facebook dans leurs pays.

L’appel était très urgent. La participation aurait pu être encore plus grande s’il y avait eu plus de médiatisation et d’annonces dans la rue. Mais en une semaine, on a globalement une très bonne réaction.  Plus: http://www.tv5.org/cms/chaine-francophone/Terriennes/Dossiers/p-24419-Mobilisation-internationale-contre-le-harcelement-sexuel-en-Egypte.htm
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Shura Council members blame women for harassment

Shura Council members blame women for harassment | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Some members call for separating men and women during protests to prevent sexual harassment, blaming women for subjecting themselves to rape.

 

The Shura Council Human Rights Committee addressed on Monday the recent wave of sexual harassment proliferating during mass protests, calling for specifying places of protest for females.

 

“Women should not mingle with men during protests,” said Reda Al-Hefnawy, Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) member. “How can the Ministry of Interior be tasked with protecting a lady who stands among a group of men?”

Adel Afifi, a prominent board member of the Salafi Party Al-Asala, blamed women for the sexual harassment phenomenon. “A woman who joins protests among thugs and street inhabitants should protect herself before asking the Ministry of Interior to offer her protection,” Afifi said, adding that police officers are incapable of protecting themselves. (...)

 

“Some foreign-funded organisations are imposing western beliefs upon us; tents present in some squares witness prostitution,”(...)

 

“What came out of the Shura Council today is horrible,” said Sally Zohney, a women’s rights activist.

 

“Those statements are inhumane, to say the least.”

Zohney condemned the council members’ trial blaming the victim for the attacks instead of offering them help. “In facing social problems regarding assaults on women, the easy way out is always to separate them [the women] from the men,” Zohney said. “Yet, it’s disastrous to hear such solutions coming out of the Shura Council.”

 

More on: http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/11/shura-council-members-blame-women-for-harassment/




Egypt-actus's insight:

From Egypt independent :

"Shura Council’s human rights committee members said on Monday that women taking part in protests bear the responsibility of being sexually harassed, describing what happens in some demonstrators’ tents as “prostitution.”

Major General Adel Afify, member of the committee representing the Salafi Asala Party, criticized female protesters, saying that they “know they are among thugs. They should protect themselves before requesting that the Interior Ministry does so. By getting herself involved in such circumstances, the woman has 100 percent responsibility.”

http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/shura-council-committee-says-female-protesters-should-take-responsibility-if-harassed?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

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Egypt Sexual Assaults Politically Motivated, Council Says

Egypt Sexual Assaults Politically Motivated, Council Says | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Sexual assaults on Egyptian female protesters have been led by organized gangs, the head of a government-backed women’s rights panel said, in what appears to be the first such acknowledgment by officials relating to crimes that have gained increasing prominence.

“There are organized gangs who commit sexual harassment during protests with the aim of scaring women and orienting them away from political participation,” Mervat Tallawy, head of state-run National Council for Women, said today in a press conference in Cairo. “Some of these cases amount to rape,” she said, referring to reported cases of women protesters being assaulted in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, the focus of anti-government demonstrations.

Tallawy decried the marginalization of women in Egypt and the increase in violence against female protesters, blaming Islamic groups and political parties for “demeaning’ women in their public statements since the 2011 uprising against Hosni Mubarak. Numerous cases of assault and rape were reported during rallies marking the second anniversary of the revolt.

“All regulations since the revolution have undermined women’s rights,” said Tallawy. “Now is the time we stand united, men and women, to end sexual harassment.

 

More on: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-10/egypt-sexual-assaults-politically-motivated-council-says.html

 

Other source: http://www.china.org.cn/world/2013-02/11/content_27939089.htm

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