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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Thousands attend funerals in Egypt port city

Thousands attend funerals in Egypt port city | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

(Reuters, via Aswat Masriya) - Thousands of people turned out on the streets of Port Said on Monday to attend the funerals of the latest victims of violence in the Egyptian city where President Mohamed Mursi has declared a state of emergency, state television images showed.

The mourners bore coffins above their heads and some waved teargas canisters at the camera. Seven people were killed on Sunday at funerals for the 33 who had died in riots a day earlier.

Gunshots were heard and teargas was fired during Sunday's processions where rage turned against the government, but there were no immediate reports of a repeat of those incidents on Monday.

(Writing by Edmund Blair; Editing by Janet Lawrence)

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Cairo celebrates the art of calligraphy

Cairo celebrates the art of calligraphy | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Cairo may be best known for its ancient Egyptian ruins, but it is also home to a vast amount of Islamic history.

In the busy Cairo streets that history is there for all to see with its ancient mosques, often decorated with intricate Koranic script.

It’s that detailed artwork that is being celebrated in Cairo during January, with the city welcoming calligraphers from around the world to take part in the International Festival for Arabic Calligraphy.

Research specialist in Arabic calligraphy at the Biblioteca Alexandrina Calligraphy Center, Mohamed Hasan is one of the organizers.

He says the traditional art from is something that exists in everyday life, ‘When I walk in the streets I see inscriptions from the Ottoman era, the Mamlouk era. At the same time there were lots of crafts linked to this art; the Koran production was here, a lot of manufacturing, paintings, even street signs, the old blue ones that we see all over Egypt,’’ said Hasan (...)

 

Arabic calligraphy is a major form of artistic expression in the Islamic world, with many different kinds of scripts.

The most famous ones are the Kufic style, a more geometric style, where many Korans have been written using this font. Another is the Tulut style used by the Mamluks in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Calligraphy is a form of artistic expression that acquired great prestige because it was used to transcribe the Koran.(...)

Egypt-actus's insight:

The body has lent the festival a piece by Iranian artist Amir Falsaffy, estimated to be worth around 10,000 U.S dollars.

Another item on display is a piece created by an Egyptian Jewish jeweler which uses mother of pearl. This creation dates back to 1912.

The Bibliotecha Alexandrina is running a project called The Digital Library of Inscriptions and Calligraphies, Dr Shereen El Kabbani, is involved in the project. (..)

The project that El Kabbani is working on documents all monuments containing Islamic script, either in Arabic, Farsi or Turkish to make them accessible to researchers or anyone with an interest. They list the location, historical period, materials used, translation, font and links to any publications that refer to the monument.

Among the specialist researchers are also artists keen to show off their designs, one of them is Yousry El Mamlouk.

Mamlouk showed off his brush skills fusing Thuloth and Jali Diwani styles.
Traditionally calligraphers were highly respected as many of them used verses from the Koran in their works of art.

But the skill isn’t only limited to paper and parchment, it’s also visible in ceramics, architecture and garments.



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Baha'i Faith in Egypt: "If I were a Baha'i" by Tarek Heggy

Baha'i Faith in Egypt: "If I were a Baha'i" by Tarek Heggy | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

If I were Bahá'í  I would have informed the world of the systematic plan to eliminate all trace of the Bahá'í Faith and the Baháís from Egypt. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have brought to the attention of all the great personalities and the intellectuals of the world the respect and regard with which their peers in Egypt received ‘Abdu’l-Bahá (Son of Bahá’u’lláh) during His visit to this country in the early 20th. Century, and with what filth and disregard today's pretentious personalities and false intellectuals of Egypt smear the fair name of Bahá’í and the Bahá’ís. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Justice in the world on the subject of the Al-Azhar Establishment and say to its honourable Ulamá: How could you decide today that Bahá’í is not a religion when the Superior Shar'ia Tribunal of Beba/Souhag ruled in 1925 that "Bahá’í is an independent religion." 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Justice in the world on the subject of the Al-Azhar Establishment which with all the mosques, mesdjids and kettab schools at their disposal in Egypt, have found it necessary to disown the Bahá’í Community of their main Centre building to use it for a Qur’ánic school.

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Justice in the world on the subject of the imprisonment of some 92 Bahá’ís--men and women--aged between 2 and 80 years. They were arrested between midnight and dawn from all over Egypt and transferred to jail in Tanta; then falsely accused of treason, misconduct and espionage, far and wide in the media, for no other reason than because they are Bahá’í. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Justice in the world on the frequent arrest of Bahá’ís, men and women, their incarceration in jail for days, weeks or months for interrogation. The courts have never found them guilty of neither crime nor fault, but they were Bahá’í. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Art in the west and in the east, to the case of one of the greatest and most admired artists of Egypt, Hussein Bikar, who was arrested in his home and driven to jail with other renowned Bahá’ís for days of interrogation regarding his and their Bahá’í Faith. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the concourse of Art in the west and in the east, and would say to them: Hussein Bikar, one of the greatest and most admired Artists of Egypt had no Identity card at his death at almost 90 years of age. The Egyptian Authorities refused to issue one with "Bahá’í" mentioned in the space for religion. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the world Organizations of Law and Justice and of Human Rights, government and non-government alike, and said to them: imagine that in Egypt of the 21st. Century, individual Identity Cards have to include the binding indication of the religion of the individual? 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the world Organizations of Law and Justice and of Human Rights, government and non-government alike, and said to them: imagine that in Egypt of the 21st. Century, individual Identity Cards must include the binding indication of one of only three religions notwithstanding the individual's wish or faith? 

 I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the world Organizations of Law and Justice and of Human Rights, government and non-government alike, and said to them: in Egypt of the 21st. Century, the sons and daughters of Bahá’ís are issued individual Identity Cards with a dash (--) for religion while their parents are refused identity cards: WHY? Because the Egyptian State does not recognize Bahá’í marriage! O people of the world: come and take stock of administrative excellence! 

Egypt-actus's insight:

IfIf I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness all the Ministers of Education of the world and informed them that: the Minister of Education of Egypt has declared that he will refuse admittance of children--yes children of Bahá’ís to the government schools because the children are Bahá’í!

If I were Bahá’í: I would have informed the world that the new Egyptian Constitution contains the necessary elements for the elimination of the Bahá’í minority in Egypt. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have informed the world that burning the homes of Bahá’ís takes place with impunity in Egypt. 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have taken for witness the world Organizations of Mass Media, of Law and Justice and of Human Rights, government and non-government alike, and informed them that in Egypt, inciting to kill Bahá’ís, through TV and speeches is normal and is done with impunity! 

In spite of all this: 

If I were Bahá’í: I would have said to those in authority in Egypt: I am loyal to my country, I love my country, I strive for the success and progress of my country and I consider the children of my neighbors as my children without consideration of religion or creed. How wonderful would Egypt be were you, who are in authority, to follow in this same path.

 



 

 

لو كنتُ بهائيا: لأخبرت العالم بالمخطط المنهجي للقضاء على البهائية والبهائيين في مصر.

لو كنتُ بهائيا: لأعلمت العظماء والمفكرين في العالم بالحفاوة والتعظيم والتبجيل الذي قابل به أمثالهم عبد البهاء عند قدومه إلى مصر في أوائل القرن العشرين. ثم ازدراء وتكفير دعاة العظمة والفكر اليوم في مصر للبهائية والبهائيين. أافتقدت مصر الفكر أم هجرها المفكرون؟

لو كنتُ بهائيا: لحكّمت أهل العدل في العالم في شأن الأزهر الشريف لأقول لعلمائه المحترمين كيف تحكمون أن البهائية ليست دين بعد الذي حكمت المحكمة الشرعية العليا في ببا/سوهاج في 1925 بأن: “البهائية دين مستقل”.

 

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«Il y a eu de vrais changements en Egypte»

«Il y a eu de vrais changements en Egypte» | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Par Delphine Minoui

 

EGYPTE, AN DEUX (2/8)- Le Figaro poursuit la diffusion d'une série de huit portraits d'Égyptiens qui ont participé à la révolution en 2011.

Un des rares habitants de son quartier à avoir soutenu le soulèvement de Tahrir, Sameh est à la fois commerçant et entraîneur de l'équipe de football locale. Ancien membre du Parti National Démocratique de Moubarak jusqu'en 2000, il s'est plus tard rapproché des Frères musulmans. Satisfait du nouveau pouvoir issu des urnes et de quelques acquis importants déjà enregistrés depuis la révolution, il regrette cependant le chaos, l'impatience et l'usure des Egyptiens et les errements d'une partie de la jeunesse qu'il dit détruite à cause de l'ancien régime.

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Despite setbacks, women’s rights activists press forward

Despite setbacks, women’s rights activists press forward | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Two years after the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak, much of the Egyptian population is still seething, unimpressed with the direction in which the new government is taking the country and disheartened by the memory of empty promises made before a set of free elections.

 

As Tahrir Square filled with protesters on the anniversary, activists from the region held a conference to discuss the situation for women in a post-Arab Spring era, expressing concerns over the rise in Islamist attitudes and the simultaneously regressive direction in which women’s rights seem to be heading.

 

“This is the time when everybody forgets about women, both conservative and liberal forces,” warned Amal Abdel Hadi, one of the founders of the Egyptian New Woman Foundation.

While women were at the forefront of the uprisings in both Egypt and Tunisia, “this period of transition is not for our benefit,” Abdel Hadi said, but added that “despite all the pressures ... they open a space for us.”

The conference, the third regional meeting of the Equality Without Reservation coalition and funded by Oxfam Novib, addressed issues from civil marriage in Lebanon to migrant domestic workers in Jordan, personal status laws in Sudan and violence against women.

Established in 2005, the coalition works to lobby governments to ensure that the U.N. Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women, drafted in 1979, is implemented on the ground. (...)

Egyptian activists slammed the new constitution, which was rushed into law in late December after a referendum and was drafted by a Constitutional Assembly from which virtually all opposition voices had withdrawn, in protest at their recommendations not being listened to.

 

“The Constitution was a disaster by any standard and we met with the president and told him that,” said Mirvat Tellawy, president of the National Women’s Council.

 

“First, they did not mention any international standards at all and nor did they commit to monitoring discrimination or punishing it as a crime.”

She also slammed the omission of an article committing to the social and economic rights of women and the lack of any mention of the trafficking of people.

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

She also slammed the omission of an article committing to the social and economic rights of women and the lack of any mention of the trafficking of people.

 

“We have a long battle ahead and what is taking place is distortion against the judiciary and the Islamic religion ... Everything they are claiming about women is wrong.”


 

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Égypte : l'opposition réfléchit à sa réponse à l'appel de Morsi au dialogue

Source AFP, via Le Point

 

La principale coalition de l'opposition égyptienne va se réunir lundi pour déterminer sa réponse à l'invitation du président islamiste Mohamed Morsi à un dialogue national en fin de journée, a annoncé à l'AFP l'un de ses membres. Le pays est plongé dans une nouvelle crise après la mort de 46 personnes en trois jours dans des violences dans trois provinces longeant le canal de Suez, où Mohamed Morsi a décrété l'état d'urgence et un couvre-feu nocturne pour 30 jours.

Egypt-actus's insight:

"Le Front du salut national (FSN) va se réunir" en début d'après-midi pour déterminer sa position, a déclaré à l'AFP Hussein Gohar, du Parti égyptien social-démocrate (ESDP), membre du FSN. Mohamed Morsi, avec qui l'opposition en majorité de gauche et libérale est à couteaux tirés, a appelé à un dialogue avec les dirigeants des forces politiques égyptiennes, y compris le FSN.

Le parti Al-Dostour du Prix Nobel de la paix Mohamed El Baradei, l'ancien patron de la Ligue arabe Amr Moussa et le troisième homme de la présidentielle de l'an dernier, Hamdeen Sabbahi, ont ainsi été invités.

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International Symposium in Cairo

International Symposium in Cairo | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

“The importance of the cultural heritage and how to preserve it - The islamic view of the urban heritage” : this International Symposium on is organized by the Ministry of State for Antiquities Affaires, the Arab Republic of Egypt, the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) and the Research Center for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA).
The symposium will he helded in Caito in 31 January 2013
Mohamed Aly Palace Manial, Golden Hall, Cairo

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Washington casts wary eye at Muslim Brotherhood; foreign aid threatened

Washington casts wary eye at Muslim Brotherhood; foreign aid threatened | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

President Barack Obama begins his second term straining to maintain a good relationship with Egypt, an important U.S. ally whose president is a conservative Islamist walking a fine line between acting as a moderate peace broker and keeping his Muslim Brotherhood party happy with anti-American rhetoric.

The White House last summer had hoped to smooth over some of the traditional tensions between Washington and the Brotherhood, a party rooted in opposition to Israel and the U.S., when Egypt overthrew dictator Hosni Mubarak and picked Mohammed Morsi as its first democratically elected leader.

But a spate of recent steps — from Brotherhood-led attacks on protesters, to vague protestations of women's freedoms in the nation's new constitution, to revelations of old comments by Morsi referring to Jews as "bloodsuckers" and "pigs" — have raised alarm among senior U.S. officials and threatens $1 billion in American aid to Egypt.(...)

The White House has little interest in picking a fight with the Muslim Brotherhood, which has grown in size and stature across the region since the Arab Spring revolts. (...)

 

When Egyptians elected Morsi, he offered words of moderation, brokered a cease-fire between Israelis and Palestinians in Gaza and bore down on terrorist dens in the Sinai Peninsula.

The Morsi-led government is "a new administration and they're obviously having growing pains," said a senior Obama administration official who agreed to speak on condition of anonymity so he could discuss the diplomatic relationship more candidly.(...)

 

The White House is increasingly concerned about the direction the Brotherhood is taking Egypt: "It's not just about majority rule," the administration official said. "There are democratic principles that we continue to support."(...)

 

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

Despite its misgivings about Morsi, the White House still is pushing Congress for the funding, acknowledging thatEgypt's downfall all but certainly would roil the already turbulent Mideast andNorth Africa.

 

He added: "The biggest fear on the part of the (Obama) administration is a political breakdown inEgypt. They are worried that a collapse in the Egyptian state would be destabilizing on the region, and might allow the flow of arms and fighters among more radical movements in the region — especially in trouble spots like Sinai and Gaza."(..)

 

But Washingtonremains wary of Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, "who come from a very conservative viewpoint with issues that are very important toAmerica," said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (…)

 

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Egypt's Salafis Emerge As Powerful, And Controversial, Political Force

Egypt's Salafis Emerge As Powerful, And Controversial, Political Force | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The uprisings of the Arab Spring unleashed a new political force in the region — Salafis. These ultra-conservative Muslims aspire to a society ruled entirely by a rigid form of Islamic law. Their models are the salaf, or ancestors, referring to the earliest Muslims who lived during the lifetime of the prophet Mohammed.

Egypt-actus's insight:

In Egypt, Salafis are now a vocal and powerful part of the political process and want to implement a strict form of Islamic law.

Nader Bakkar, a young engineer, is the spokesman for Egypt's most successful Salafi political party, Nour. He insists their ideology is not backward looking.

"It's not a thing that conflicts with civilization or modern society, not at all," Bakkar says.

He sits in a hotel lobby. Nearby, men drink beer and women sit unveiled. It certainly isn't the vision of Egypt that Nour has in mind.

Bakkar says the closest thing to a Salafi-run state is Saudi Arabia, a nation where women can't drive, have few rights and people live in a gender-segregated society. It is also a nation with strong ties to the West.

"Politically speaking, the kind of Salafi regime — or the one that is very near to the Salafi regime — it is accepted worldwide," he said, referring to Saudi Arabia.

But he adds that Egypt is not Saudi Arabia, with its diverse population of Christians, Sufis and other types of Muslims.

"We cannot impose our religious point of view, our doctrine," Bakkar says, adding that people must choose it. (...)

Critics say Salafis are among the most polarizing elements of Egyptian society, transforming every political debate into a referendum on religiosity in a nation where most Egyptians are Muslim. They add that the basis of Salafism ignores 1,400 years of history and uses religion to manipulate.

A popular TV satirist, Bassem Youssef, has made it a mission to battle the Salafi influence on his comedy show. In one program last month, this liberal Muslim who's known for his humor, found nothing to joke about as he discussed the Salafi political agenda.

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Editorial: Violence that bodes ill for Egypt's future

Editorial: Violence that bodes ill for Egypt's future | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

It is no revelation to say that regime change is often messy, whether the impetus comes from outside, as in Iraq, or from within, as in Egypt. Blowing the lid off a seething cauldron only exposes the myriad currents competing beneath. To count on a calm and uncontested transition in such circumstances is foolhardy.

But Egypt's transition has unleashed violence in unexpected places. The football pitch, which elsewhere has allowed opposing factions to play out their hostility by non-lethal means, has become something of a war zone in itself. At Port Said last February, more than 70 people were killed in a riot following a match between the home team, al-Masry, and al-Ahly from Cairo. And last week, when a Cairo court sentenced all 21 defendants to death for their role in that violence, to whoops of joy from the courtroom, the rioters simply picked up where they left off. In Port Said more than 30 people were reported killed, including two footballers; the prison was stormed and the state security building set on fire. Yesterday's funerals brought more violence.

Egypt's new rulers have shown a particular knack for poor timing. The sentences in the Port Said riot case were handed down just the day after Egypt had marked two years since the fall of Hosni Mubarak – an occasion bound to exacerbate the country's divisions. That anniversary brought protests, some violent, in many Egyptian cities, where people expressed their dissatisfaction with President Morsi and with each other. By yesterday, there were seven dead and more than 400 injured nationwide. The potential for the different protests – the football and the politics – to fuse to malign effect should have been clear for all to see.


 

The timing of the sentences was not the authorities' only misstep. They had already precipitated needless uncertainty by annulling the first trial of the former President and calling a new one. With Mr Mubarak old and ill – so ill last time around that he was brought to the courtroom on his hospital bed – it is hard to conceive of any decision less likely to quell political passions and promote the spirit of common purpose that Egypt so badly needs. And this was after President Morsi had inflicted a blow to his own, and Egypt's, interests by seizing the power to overrule the country's judiciary. At home and abroad, this false move almost eclipsed his achievement in brokering the ceasefire between Israel.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Such confused signals and outright mistakes can be put down partly to Mr Morsi's inexperience of politics and government, after the decades in which the Muslim Brotherhood existed, at best, in a twilight zone. But they have only accelerated the growth of popular disillusionment. The economy is still in a dire state; tourism remains in the doldrums – and the latest violence will hardly remedy that. No progress has been made either in stemming unemployment or boosting public services – failures that reflect poorly on the efficacy of government.

This is not to negate the progress that has been made in the past two years. Egyptians have been to the ballot box no fewer than four times, in reasonably good order, and some of the recent violence doubtless reflects the heady effects of sudden freedom. But Mr Morsi does not have the luxury of time. With legislative elections due in late spring, he has still to convince voters that government can improve their lives and that there are better ways to settle differences than resorting to violence on the streets.

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Qandil: visite inopinée de la Place Tahrir

Qandil: visite inopinée de la Place Tahrir | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le Premier Ministre, Hisham Qandil a effectué lundi matin une visite inopinée à la Place Tahrir, au cours de laquelle il a inspecté les forces de sécurité installée dans le périmètre et a assisté à l’arrestation de 2 « malfrats » en possession d'armes blanches et de grandes sommes d’argent.

Dans un contact téléphonique avec le Ministre de l'Intérieur Mohammed Ibrahim, Qandil a souligné l’importance  de faire preuve de fermeté avec les hors-la-loi et a appelé les forces et partis politiques –dans le cadre du dialogue national- à lever la couverture politique des vandales, renoncer à la violence et condamner les attaques contre les forces de la police et les installations vitales.

 

Il est prévu que le PM tienne une réunion ce jour avec le Ministre de l'Intérieur pour discuter de la situation sécuritaire dans les villes du Canal (de Suez) et le reste des gouvernorats. Il présidera également une réunion du groupe ministériel pour préparer la mise en place du dialogue national.

 

 

 

قام رئيس مجلس الوزراء الدكتور هشام قنديل فجر اليوم الاثنين  بجولة مفاجئة تفقد

 

 

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Renouvellement des heurts à Mahala et réclamation d'un état d'urgence

Renouvellement des heurts à Mahala et réclamation d'un état d'urgence | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Les alentours du Conseil Municipal de Mahala et la région d’El- Hanafi ont connu de nouveaux affrontements entre manifestants et forces de sécurité. Les manifestants ont lancé des pierres et tenté de prendre d'assaut le Conseil.

Les forces de sécurité ont intensifié leur présence devant le bâtiment, ont coupé l'électricité dans la région, et ont arrêté un certain nombre de manifestants après avoir mis le feu à des pneus et lancé des cocktails molotov sur les policiers. Des grenades lacrymogènes ont été lancées par la police pour essayer de disperser les manifestants.

D'autre part, un grand nombre d’habitants et des membres des forces politiques et des mouvements de jeunesse de Mahala, ont exprimé leur solidarité totale avec les 3 provinces du Canal: Port-Saïd, Ismaïlia et Suez, et ont réclamé au Président Morsi de déclarer également l’état d’urgence à Mahala en signe de soutien aux autres grouvernorats.

 

 

 

شهد محيط مجلس مدينة المحلة، ومنطقة الحنفي، تجدد الاشتباكات بين المتظاهرين وقوات الأمن، حيث قام المتظاهرون بالتجمع مرة أخرى، وحاولوا اقتحام المجلس،

 

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Réactions: Tweets d'El-Baradei et El-Aswani

Réactions:  Tweets d'El-Baradei et El-Aswani | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

 

Dr. Mohamed El-Baradei, Président du Parti de « la Constitution » a déclaré sur son compte Twitter que tout dialogue avec le président Morsi à l'heure actuelle serait une perte de temps.

 

Le Président devrait avoir le courage de déclarer pleinement ses responsabilités, en tant que président du pays, dans l'escalade des événements actuels.

 

D'autre part,l’écrivain Alaa El-Aswani a également publié un tweet, dans lequel il considérait que l’acceptation de l’invitation au dialogue national, lancée par le Président Morsi, tout en gardant en vigueur la Constitution actuelle, était une trahison pour la Révolution.


 

(pour El-Aswani: http://onaeg.com/?p=545182-

 

-أكد الدكتور محمد البرادعي، رئيس حزب الدستور، أن اى حوار مع الرئيس محمد مرسي فى الوقت الحالي، سيكون مضيعة للوقت، ما لم يتحلى بالشجاعة الادبية، ويعلن مسئوليته الكاملة كرئيس للبلاد، عن تصاعد الاحداث الجارية

 

- أكد الدكتورعلاء الاسوانى، الاديب والروائي العالمي، ان قبول دعوة الرئيس محمد مرسي للحوار، فى ظل الابقاء على الدستور الحالي، هو خيانة للثورة

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Francoise Autier's comment, January 28, 2013 2:15 AM
je n aime pas baradei mais il a raison. ca ne sert a rien de parler avec Morsi. et c est trop tard, il a trop de sang sur les mains !!!!
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Terrifying video shows Egypt police shoot man in wheelchair in Port Said

هذا الفيديو دليل على القتل العشوائى من ظباط الشرطه قتل رجل على كرسى متحرك و ابنه الذى يساعده بالنار اثناء سيرهم فى شارع محمد على و قتل 3 من كانو يحاولو مساعد...
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Wide reactions follow Mursi’s emergency state deceleration to halt chaos

Wide reactions follow Mursi’s emergency state deceleration to halt chaos | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi’s speech late on Sunday prompted various reactions from the country’s political factions, after he declared a state of emergency in three Suez Canal provinces that had been experiencing violent protests for the past four days.

The country’s April 6 Movement released a statement criticizing the president’s speech and calling for more protests on Monday.

“Day after day, Mursi proves that he is the worst Egyptian president throughout the country’s history,” the movement said in a statement. “He is a criminal not working for the benefit of the of the Egyptian people".

 

The movement accused the ministry of interior and militia’s belonging to the Brotherhood of attacking participants in the Port Said funeral procession on Sunday. State television said seven people died from gunshot wounds in Port Said on Sunday. Port Said’s head of hospitals, Abdel Rahman Farag, told Reuters more than 400 people had suffered from teargas inhalation, while 38 were wounded by gunshots.

“We waited for the Egyptian president to speak and calm down outraged people,” the statement said, adding that “the Brotherhood leader instead made matters worse by warning of more killings.”

Distancing itself from the latest flare-ups, the opposition National Salvation Front said Mursi should have acted far sooner to impose extra security measures that would end the violence. (...)

 

Mursi had invited 11 political parties, including Islamist, liberal and leftist groups, along with four top politicians to a meeting on Monday at 6 p.m. local time (1600 GMT)to work out a basis for a fruitful dialogue that would resolve the political crisis, according to a statement from his office.

The Front said it will meet earlier on Monday to discuss the invitation.
(...)




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Egypt chaos points to longer, riskier transition

Egypt chaos points to longer, riskier transition | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

(Reuters Breakingviews, via Aswat) - The deadly chaos in Egypt marking the second anniversary of the uprising shows that the transition in the Arab world's most populous country will be long and painful. The anti-government violence in several cities along the Suez Canal, which has left 49 people dead and parts of the country in a state of emergency, is rooted in a deep distrust of the country's basic institutions. That's a problem the Muslim Brotherhood government cannot afford to ignore any longer. (...)


The difficulty of overcoming Egypt's political divisions has been widely underestimated. Though the country's long-term growth story remains intact, a recovery will take longer than many expected, and it will be riskier too as each month of instability brings fresh economic losses and deters investment.

The violence is weighing on the Egyptian pound which has already lost 8 percent of its value this year. Amid rising prices, the government has little room to maneuver. And the fact that violent riots are happening along the Suez Canal will reinforce worries about the security of that strategic route, and the precious foreign currency it generates for Cairo.

Egypt's disparate political factions blame each other for the disorder but none alone look able to generate enough popular support to launch the necessary deep reforms the country badly needs. To restore meaningful stability, it looks increasingly urgent for the Muslim Brotherhood to try to find a compromise with its political adversaries, and build a consensus on how best to modernise the country.

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Assaults on Egyptian Women Peak in Protest, Group Says

Assaults on Egyptian Women Peak in Protest, Group Says | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

At least 19 women were severely sexually assaulted or raped in Cairo’s Tahrir Square during the second anniversary of Egypt’s uprising, in what rights groups say was the highest reported toll in the country in two years.

A 19-year-old woman had her genitalia sliced with a knife while others were assaulted on Jan. 25 by male mobs, Dalia Abdel-Hamid, a researcher at the Cairo-based Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, said by telephone yesterday.

Abdel-Hamid and other women’s rights activists have repeatedly highlighted sexual harassment and assaults in Egypt, saying the problem has grown increasingly widespread and violent since the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak on Feb. 11, 2011.

“The assaults were the largest and most intense as far as we know since the revolution,” Abdel-Hamid, who volunteered with the Cairo-based Op-Anti Sexual Harassment, or Opantish, initiative on the night of the attacks, said. “The attackers were using weapons and sometimes there were four concurrent mob harassments in the street that could be seen from the top of a balcony.”

Male volunteers with the Opantish group, which worked to rescue women being assaulted in the square, also came under threat. “Attackers had knives and bottles; one of our volunteers was stabbed in the leg,” Abdel-Hamid said.

Women in public in Egypt frequently experience sexual harassment and assaults, the New York-based Human Rights Watch said in a December 2011 report.

 

The ruling military council at the time “continued the poor record of the ousted Mubarak administration by failing to prevent, investigate or punish such attacks,” HRW said.

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The unwanted mothers who are patrons of Arab women’s rights

The unwanted mothers who are patrons of Arab women’s rights | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

In recent history, women’s legal rights in the Arab world have often required the patronage of elite women. Initiatives by kings’ or (as in Egypt) presidents’ wives have frequently been a necessary precondition not only to place women’s issues on the national agenda, but to ensure their implementation. As a result of this approach, certain patterns have defined the development of the women’s movement throughout the Arab world. Having a “Mother of the Nation” in the form of a Suzanne Mubarak or a Jihan Sadat (both of whom positioned themselves as patrons of women’s movement) implies that ordinary women lack the ability to make their own needs heard to the ruling elite. This creates the impression that ordinary women do not care about their rights. But can a spokeswoman for the “woman in the street” really emerge from among the upper classes?

 

In the 1950s, then-president Gamal Abdel Nasser initiated a period of social and political improvement regarding women’s equality without any input on the part of his wife. And while women were given the right to vote in 1956 and were incorporated into the workforce due to these efforts at modernization, Nasser’s integration of women was deficient in the private sphere; there was no attempt to reform family law or to improve women’s position within the family – possibly because it was considered too controversial.

 

One could even go one step further and claim that, in the absence of a strong female proponent of reform, the private sphere itself remained untouched; Article 8 of the 1971 Constitution guaranteed the equality of all Egyptian citizens politically, but it did not extend this principal to family law.

 

Since then, the women’s movement would continue to rely on the presence of an elite patron; the only novelty since the early 1950s being that such patrons did not need to be exclusively male – as in Nasser’s case. And with their wives championing these causes, presidents have since circumvented discursive parliamentary process by passing laws either during parliamentary recess or by decree. An example of this was Law 44 of 1979 – commonly known as “Jihan’s Law.” The law was eventually declared unconstitutional “in retrospect” because it was enforced by presidential decree. The content of the law (which, among other things, granted women the ability to apply for divorce from their husbands for marrying a second wife, for example) also made it very unpopular. Subsequently, a watered-down version of this amendment to the family law was introduced to the legislature in 1985 under President Hosni Mubarak.(...)

 

Recently, however, one of the most wide-reaching reforms of Egyptian family law – “the Khul Law” – was enacted in 2000. This law gave women the right to a no-fault, unilateral divorce. Previously, only men had the right to file for divorce without naming the grounds of separation. This was a significant step toward leveling the playing field between men and women and one dare say toward gender equality. (…)

 


 

Egypt-actus's insight:

It does, indeed, seem that Arab women require a spokeswoman from the political elite to make their claims heard. But the ones presently available do not bode well for women inEgyptor elsewhere in the Arab world. “Umm Ahmad,” as Egypt’s present First Lady Naglaa Ali Mahmoud likes to be known, embodies the Islamic dichotomy between the public and private roles of men and women. “Mrs. Mursi” is typical of the Islamist ideal of a woman confined to the private realm of housewife and mother. Will she be the one to champion women’s rights and gender equality?



Still, the questions remain: Why did the NCW need a First Lady as its primary patron? What is it that qualifies elite women to represent the interests of (Egyptian) women in general? And why is it women that from the center of society or prominent members of the civil society community aren’t received in the same manner as the spouses of autocratic rulers? These questions do not necessarily refer to women’s issues alone but also pertain to other areas of civil rights. (..)


The time is right for activists to step off the streets and represent their points of view in the political arena. The present situation is an opportunity for Arab women to prove that they can take power into their own hands in the absence of patronage; this means occupying formal political office and calling as activists for accountability and more input from civil society. The onus is now on Arab women to take that fight to a new level and organize themselves in the formal and informal political spheres without the help of an autocratic mistress.



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Egypt opposition mulls response to Mursi dialogue call

Egypt opposition mulls response to Mursi dialogue call | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

 

Egypt's main opposition will meet Monday to consider its response to President Mohamed Mursi's call for a national dialogue aimed at ending the crisis gripping the country, an opposition member told AFP.

 

Egypt plunged into a new crisis after the deaths of 46 people in three days of violence across three provinces, prompting Islamist Mursi late Sunday to impose a month-long state of emergency in the riot-hit regions.

Facing stiff resistance from an opposition of mainly leftists and liberals, Mursi also called all political forces to a national dialogue.

 

"The National Salvation Front will meet" in the early afternoon to determine its position, said Hussein Gohar of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, a member of the NSF.

 

Mursi also invited the Al-Dustur party founded by Nobel laureate Mohamed Elbaradei, former Arab League chief Amr Moussa, and Hamdeen Sabbahi, a presidential candidate in last year's election -- all members of the NSF.

 

In a statement late Sunday, Sabbahi's movement expressed its "refusal to participate amid the continuing bloodshed and continuing crimes by the regime against demonstrators".

 

It said it believes that "any serious call for dialogue needs real guarantees for success, the most important being that the president offers political solutions and security."

 

Mursi's reaching out to the opposition came after at least 46 people were killed in three days in Suez Canal cities, with the deadliest clashes in Port Said where 37 people lost their lives. (...)

Despite the state of emergency and the announcement of the curfew, residents of Port Said demonstrated into the night and are preparing for new rallies on Monday, witnesses said.

 
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Egypt protester: "There is no bread, no freedom"

Egypt protester: "There is no bread, no freedom" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

(..) Opponents accuse Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood party of not delivering economic reforms and not living up to pledges to represent all Egyptians.

 

"None of the goals of the revolution we made two years ago have been achieved," said protester Maher Hamam. "There is no bread, no freedom, no dignity." (…)

 

President Morsi went on state TV to announce a 30-day state of emergency and an overnight curfew in three Egyptian cities (…)

 

Military patrols have taken to the streets to restore order, and the local commander said the army had requested authority to arrest lawbreakers.

The Egyptian president called for dialogue, but more demonstrations are planned for Monday

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Egypt's Socialist Popular Alliance rejects Morsi dialogue

Egypt's Socialist Popular Alliance rejects Morsi dialogue | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Socialist Popular Alliance Party has rejected President Mohamed Morsi's call for a national dialogue.

 

The party has also demanded the dismissal and the trial of the interior minister for "killing protesters."

 

In a statement issued late Sunday, the group also condemned the "performance of security forces when dealing with peaceful demonstrations" in recent days.

 

"The violence by security forces will push protesters to use more violence," it added.

 

The "real perpetrators and masterminds" of the Port Said Stadium disaster, which killed 74 people in February 2012, should be put on trial, not just those who "carried out the crime."

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Point de vue : l’Egypte dans une spirale infernale, par Mohammed Larbi

Point de vue : l’Egypte dans une spirale infernale -
Egypt-actus's insight:

Extraits

 

Tout le monde a en effet relevé que dans les affrontements opposant manifestants et forces de l’ordre, des armes à feu sont utilisées. Ce qui est réellement grave. Pourquoi ce changement ? Comment a-t-il pu se produire ? Est-ce le signe de l’exaspération des manifestants ou celui du pourrissement de la situation ? Une espèce de radicalisation dans les positions des uns et des autres que rapporte la position de l’opposition, exprimée samedi, mais qui exclut tout recours à la violence. Et qui arme les manifestants ? Des médecins ont indiqué que toutes les victimes avaient été tuées par balles réelles.

L’armée, pour sa part, a démenti avoir utilisé de telles munitions. Sont-ce de simples manifestants qui veulent faire aboutir leurs revendications? Et qui définit les cibles, car là, il s’agit d’attaques en règle visant notamment les postes de police ? L’Egypte avait même peur que ses installations parmi les plus importantes et les plus sensibles en soient aussi la cible. Il en est ainsi du canal de Suez dont la protection a été renforcée par l’armée après les heurts meurtriers à Port-Saïd et à Suez, deux villes situées sur cet axe majeur du commerce international.

(...)

Ce que l’on retiendra de ces bouleversements qui suscitent l’appréhension des services de sécurité, c’est que des armes ont été dérobées à ces mêmes forces. Il y a bien eu des attaques contre les installations militaires, notamment dans le Sinaï, ou des gazoducs, et leurs auteurs ont été tués ou pourchassés sans que leur identité soit établie ou révélée.

Faisant face une contestation de plus en plus forte et surtout toujours aussi déterminée, le président égyptien Morsi a appelé les Egyptiens à «rejeter la violence», alors que ceux auxquels il s’adresse considèrent que la première violence est bien la sienne pour s’être emparé de tous les pouvoirs. Il a provoqué une rupture de confiance si celle-ci venait à exister, sinon à exacerber les tensions, les manifestants considérant qu’ils ont été spoliés de leur victoire. Autant dire que la marge de manœuvre du président égyptien est réduite, le pays traversant aussi une grave crise économique.

L’opposition, qui revendique une «solution globale» passant par la mise sur pied d’un gouvernement de «salut national» et d’une commission devant amender la Constitution qualifiée d’illégale, n’en élargit pas le spectre.
Que fera-t-il alors ? L’immobilisme n’a jamais été une solution pour extraire l’Egypte de cette spirale de violence.

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Reprise du travail dans les administrations publiques de Suez

Reprise du travail dans les administrations publiques de Suez | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le travail a repris régulièrement ce lundi matin dans les services de la Municipalité de Suez et autres services administratifs publics.  Une absence d’un grand nombre d’employés a été remarquée, suite aux incidents que connaît le gouvernorat depuis 3 jours.

 

D’autre part, le travail est complètement suspendu dans tous les tribunaux. D’après le Président de la Cour, le travail reprendra normalement à partir de demain, après la décision d’interrompre le travail pendant 2 jours pour raison d’insécurité et suite à la destruction de la façade arrière du complexe des tribunaux.

 

 

 

انتظم العمل ،صباح اليوم الإثنين ،بشكل رسمى إلى مبنى الديوان العام لمحافظة السويس و كافة

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Port-Saïd, Suez et Ismaïlia ignorent l'état d'urgence

Port-Saïd, Suez et Ismaïlia ignorent l'état d'urgence | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Alors que les violences se poursuivent en Egypte, le président Mohamed Morsi prend les choses en main en décrétant l'état d'urgence pendant un mois dans trois provinces d'Egypte, Port-Saïd, Suez et Ismaïlia. Cette décision faite suite aux violences survenues dans cette zone qui ont fait 46 morts en l'espace de trois jours. La grande majorité des victimes est tombée à Port-Saïd, alors que plusieurs milliers de personnes assistaient aux funérailles des personnes tuées la veille. Un couvre-feu est aussi instauré.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Par Alexandre Buccianti/RFI

 

Les trois provinces concernées, Port-Saïd, Suez et Ismaïlia, ont rejeté les décrets présidentiels qui doivent instaurer l'état d'urgence. Geste de défi, les trois villes ont organisé de grandes manifestations juste après minuit, heure de l’entrée en vigueur de la loi de l’état d’urgence et du couvre-feu. Certains manifestants ont même tiré des feux d’artifices comme pour un jour de l’An.

A Suez, les manifestants ont brandi leurs chaussures pour exprimer leur pensée à l’égard du président. A Port-Saïd, des slogans insultants ont été chantés par des opposants contre un président qu’ils disent ne plus reconnaître. Des manifestants outrés par l’hommage fait par Mohamed Morsi à la police qu’ils accusent d’avoir tué 36 habitants de Port-Saïd. Quant au peuple d’Internet, il a fait circuler sur les réseaux sociaux une déclaration de Morsi, avant qu’il ne soit président, où il affirmait que l’Etat d’urgence était « une loi pour défendre les voleurs et le pouvoir des despotes ».

Il ne fait pas de doute que les partis islamistes répondront à l’invitation au dialogue de la présidence mais la question est moins évidente du côté des partis composants le Front du salut national. Le Front avait indiqué la veille qu’il exigeait que le dialogue soit supervisé par une autorité neutre et que les accords réalisés soient contraignants. Les accords passés lors de précédents dialogues avaient été enterrés sous prétexte qu’ils n’avaient pas été établis par des élus du peuple.

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Janvier 2013 = Janvier 2011

Cette vidéo a été mise en ligne le 28 Janvier 2011

 

Egypte , la revolution est en marche en avant vers la democratie , rien ne sera obtenu sans sacrifices , les têtes des dictateurs doivent tomber,l'heure de rendre des comptes est arrivée.

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