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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Le Caire : le mythe d'une ville au bord de l'explosion

Le Caire : le mythe d'une ville au bord de l'explosion | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
by Jon Argaman 

Cairo is a crowded city. It is a truism that is easy to find in reportage about the city, which almost invariably begins with a description of Cairo as teeming, noisy, dusty, and polluted. Vendors and parked cars take over sidewalks for lack of space, while pedestrians walk amongst traffic. Shouts and car horns drown out everything else and traffic jams stretch on for miles. Numbers back up the impression: In 2006, just as the a long-term "visioning" exercise known as Cairo 2050 was beginning, the World Bank estimated Cairo’s population density at 37,136 per square kilometer, while CAPMAS, Egypt’s national statistics agency, more recently (2012) had the number at 45,000 per square kilometer, or about one-and-a-half times the population density of Manhattan. The 2008 JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) master plan claimed that, depending on how one defines "Greater Cairo," it may be the most densely-populated city in the world. It would seem obvious that this level of density is a problem, and that, as Minister of Housing Ahmed al-Maghrabi said a few months before the 2011 uprising began, the city will eventually explode.

However, the seemingly-commonsense notion that Cairo must be un-crowded if it is to be sustainable, is problematic in two senses: first, there are reasons to be skeptical of claims that Cairo's degree of population density actually is unsustainable and undesirable; and second, the assumption that Cairo is "too crowded" and therefore its people must be dispersed, allows state officials to disengage from the problems and concerns of the city and the people who live in it. Instead, the discourse around density contributes to and in a sense authorizes often-fantastical plans to colonize the desert.

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Dans la ville du Caire, beaucoup d'habitants se débrouillent comme ils peuvent, sans l'aide de l'Etat.

Dans la ville du Caire, beaucoup d'habitants se débrouillent comme ils peuvent, sans l'aide de l'Etat. | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

For the residents of the Middle East andAfrica’s largest city, Cairo, 2013 ended with the often repeated government promise to finally provide basic services and development in the slums, where half of the city’s residents live. 

But instead of waiting for Prime Minister Hazem Al-Beblawi’s slum renewal project, announced in November, to bear fruit, many are simply coping as best they can without the state. 

When basic services are lacking, it is often down to slum dwellers to use their own initiative. They dig land, construct septic tanks and water pipes, install storage barrels, and raise community funds to get private engineers to build sewage pipes and connect them to the main network. 

“These communities have an inherent self-reliance in finding ways to get by,” said Thomas Culhane, co-founder of Solar CITIES, an NGO that invests in solar and renewable energy in poor communities. 

Few sit around waiting for the government to fulfil its promises. 

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Egypte : Les riches Cairotes filent au vert

Egypte :  Les riches Cairotes filent au vert | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Afin de décongestionner la capitale égyptienne, des ensembles résidentiels ont poussé comme des champignons au milieu du désert, à quelques dizaines de kilomètres du centre-ville. 6-Octobre est le nom de l'une de ces cités, la plus ancienne. Îlots réservés dans un premier temps aux Cairotes les plus aisés, certains ensembles résidentiels sont peu à peu gagnés par la mixité et, comme partout en Égypte, l'informel y reprend ses droits.

 

«Bienvenue dans Le Caire du futur, où une vie meilleure est possible. » Ce panneau géant qui domine la route sèche, avec en fond la photo d’une villa avec piscine, a dû faire rêver plus d’un Cairote. Échapper à la pollution et à la densité du centre est devenu un fantasme collectif chez les habitants les plus aisés du Caire. Le songe a commencé à prendre corps dans les années 1980, quand des hectares de déserts ont été transformés en une succession de villes nouvelles autour de la capitale égyptienne.

 

Plus: http://www.latribune.fr/actualites/economie/international/20130320trib000754402/reportage-egypte-les-riches-cairotes-filent-au-vert.html

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Francoise Autier's comment, March 20, 2013 6:55 AM
ca ne m attire pas du tout !!!!
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Astounding satellite images show China and Egypt’s rapid growth

Astounding satellite images show China and Egypt’s rapid growth | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A new study by Swiss researchers at ETH Zurich finds explosive development in many parts of the world — and lots of other twinkly signs that the earth’s economic center has, according to the study, moved east.

 

The study, published earlier this week, looked at satellite images of nighttime lights since such records were first digitized in 1992. They posit that electricity correlates with wealth, which suggests some dramatic changes in the developing world from then until 2009.

 

The study also found huge growth in Egypt (especially around the Nile River, pictured above)(...) Some of the lighter and dimmer areas have grown both in size, and have grown brighter and dimmer, respectively. This is perhaps a sign of urbanization, as people in less-lit rural areas continue to move into bright urban areas.(...)

 

More on: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/03/15/astounding-satellite-images-show-china-and-egypts-rapid-growth/

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"L’informel urbain depuis la révolution du 25 janvier" (séminaire)

"L’informel urbain depuis la révolution du 25 janvier" (séminaire) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le pôle Ville et développement durable du CEDEJ, le Participatory Development Programm in Urban Areas de la GIZ (coopération allemande) et UN-Habitat Cairo s’associent pour organiser un séminaire permettant aux chercheurs, acteurs du développement, professionnels de l’urbanisme, décideurs et acteurs de la société civile de débattre des grandes questions d’aménagement urbain en Egypte.

Le premier séminaire de l’année 2013, qui se tiendra le lundi 11 mars à l’IFE, de 9h30 à 17h, sera consacré au développement des quartiers informels dans les villes égyptiennes et aux réponses apportées par les pouvoirs publics depuis la révolution de janvier 2011.

 

Pour plus d’informations sur le séminaire et le programme (en anglais) : http://www.ambafrance-eg.org/IMG/pdf/Programme_EgyptUrbanFutures.pdf

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Séminaire sur l'urbanisme

Séminaire sur l'urbanisme | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Le CEDEJ, en partenariat avec le ministère allemand de la Coopération et UN-Habitat Cairo, organisent un séminaire sur « L’informel urbain depuis la révolution du 25 janvier ». Acteurs du développement, urbanistes et acteurs de la société civile échangeront sur les derniers développements des quartiers informels en Egypte depuis janvier 2011.


• Le 11/03 de 9h30 à 17h à l’IFE de Mounira

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Compactness and Environmental Responsibility: Manhattan vs. Cairo

Compactness and Environmental Responsibility: Manhattan vs. Cairo | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A utopian green environment isn’t necessarily one that is full of trees and open spaces; it is one that is compact, full of high side-by-side apartment buildings, and bustling with people. (...)

 

Cairo has a rapidly growing population that has currently reached 9,120,350. As the population continuously expands, the amount of automobile ownership has been increasing as well reaching an estimate of 114 cars per 1,000 people. According to a UN report, “Cairo has one of the lowest provisions of road space per capita and dramatic growth in the number of private vehicles.”  Having too many cars causes not only unbearable traffic, but even worse, excessive air pollution, which is a major environmental concern in Cairo.  According to the Report,  “Cairo's volatile aromatic hydrocarbon levels are higher than many other similar cities. Air quality measurements in Cairo have also been recording dangerous levels of lead, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and suspended particulate matter concentrations due to decades of unregulated vehicle emissions, urban industrial operations, and chaff and trash burning.”  The problem here is not only because of the large number of cars, but more specifically because many of the cars are over ten years old and therefore lack modern emission cutting features like catalytic converters. The traffic in Cairo is quite horrendous and it has become a serious challenge for a traveler to get from one point to another. Not only is time wasted due to traffic, but also fuel burns faster when the car is immobile, therefore also increasing the air pollution.  Describing “Compact Living in a Developing City: Cairo, Egypt”, Doug Booth reports that despite this outburst in automobile traffic, the average Egyptian cannot afford a private car, and that is where taxis, minibuses, and overcrowded municipal buses come into play supplying at least 50% of inner city transportation.” (...)

The Egyptian population does not seem to be as concerned about “greenerizing” their environment as much as the American population. The Egyptian curriculum in public schools does not emphasize the importance of living in an eco-friendly environment or what it even means to be eco-friendly. As the president of the National Honor Society in a private American school in Egypt, I initiated a Go-Green campaign to inform the students about the importance of something as simple as segregating trash and reasons why we should start doing it. The project was not very successful because the students were never really exposed to this way of life, so it was hard for them to adapt and start implementing it. This is similar to how the Egyptian environmental culture as a whole compares to that of the United States. 


Also looking at it from a financial perspective, the Egyptian government does not spend enough on improving its environmental aspects because according to Egypt’s former Minister of Finance, Youssef Boutros Ghali, “we have more pressing problems.” Samir Mowafi, general manager of Egypt's Regional Center for Environment Protection, is trying to persuade his fellow citizens that they must start believing in the importance of improving the environment even if the long-term benefits are intangible.


Many changes are taking place now in post-revolution Egypt and hopefully a major one will be the mindset of the citizens on preserving the environment.  Growing up in Cairo, I have always been exposed to excessive amounts of air pollution that I figured our environment was a hopeless case. After reading Owen’s essay on Green Manhattan, in which he defines Manhattan as a “green utopia”, I realized that Cairo has parallel characteristics that can make it an eco-friendly city just like Manhattan. With a new perspective, I now believe that Cairo can definitely become an environmentally prosperous city in the near future. 

(Nada Zaher/Midan Masr)


More : http://www.midanmasr.com/en/article.aspx?ArticleID=267

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mafto7 - public space in cairo مفتوح - الأماكن العامة فى القاهرة

The project is called mafto7 (maftoh), which means open. this word became meaningful to me after having interviewed with people in the street. we would have long talk about how public spaces are closed with fences and how it used to be open for them in the past. they dont know why the government decided to close public spaces with fences. yes, the government has a huge influence on the public space. there are many examples and research about how the government controls on public space.

this 3 min video is actually for the competition and it had to be within 3 min. soon, i will upload a 30-40 min short film where interview of experts will be added, like...may abrashy, mazen abdulkarim, omar nagati, ahmed zaazaa. all of them are architects/ urban planners and some of them had done projects in a public space. and as well as many interviews from people in the street, in megawra. many of them really said important words and useful stuff. this short video is about the ideas and the facts. i hope you will enjoy this video or be inspired because there many ideas that can be done, much better than mine even...!).

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Exposition : "Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle"‏ au Centre Canadien d'Architecture

Exposition : "Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle"‏ au Centre Canadien d'Architecture | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Du 30 janvier au 25 mai 2014, l’exposition Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle au CCA présente les débuts de la photographie au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord : une période durant laquelle les photographes, qu’ils soient amateurs, pèlerins, membres de missions scientifiques ou photographes commerciaux, voyagèrent vers ces régions et rapportèrent leurs impressions de voyage. Sous le commissariat de Jorge Correia, professeur associé à l’école d’architecture de l’Université de Minho (Escola de Arquitectura da Universidade do Minho – EAUM) au Portugal, l’exposition interprète la manière dont la ville islamique traditionnelle a été représentée par différents photographes européens (dont Francis Frith, Emile Béchard, Félix Bonfils et Maxime du Camp). (...)

Une cinquantaine de photographies tirée de la collection du CCA sont présentées et exposée sous la forme d’images individuelles, de planches détachées, d’albums et de portfolios, qui présentent les principales villes arabes du 19e siècle dont Le Caire et Damas. Parmi ces images, on reconnaîtra les toutes premières méthodes d’impression et de diffusion photographiques : papiers salés, papiers albuminés, tirages photomécaniques, plaques pour lanternes de projection et cartes stéréoscopiques. Il est à noter que ces photographies font partie d’un corpus plus important sur le Moyen-Orient. Leur acquisition au tout début de la formation de la Collection du CCA (dans les années 70 et 80), témoigne de leur valeur et pertinence pour l’institution. La sélection de photographies livre un portrait de la réalité urbaine et de l’organisation de la ville telles qu’elles existaient il y a un siècle et demi, et fait apparaître une nette distinction entre le territoire public – halal, ce qui est permis ou profane -, et le haram – le privé, l’interdit ou la sphère du sacré. Comme l’explique Correia, « cette dichotomie est présente à tous les niveaux de la culture islamique et donc dans l’organisation de la ville depuis ses frontières jusqu’à ses voies et à ses constructions».


Centre Canadien d’Architecture
1920, rue Baile
Montréal, Québec
H3H 2S6

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Égypte: l’UE finance un projet pour améliorer les conditions de vie dans la région du Grand Caire

Égypte: l’UE finance un projet pour améliorer les conditions de vie dans la région du Grand Caire | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Des représentants des autorités égyptiennes et de l’Union européenne, ainsi que d’autres acteurs, se sont réunis au Caire la semaine dernière pour examiner des pistes pour le développement de quatre zones d’habitation informelles de Gizeh et du Caire. Cette réunion a marqué le lancement de la prochaine phase d’un projet de développement à grande échelle, financé par l’UE en vue d’améliorer les conditions de vie et environnementales dans ces zones d’habitation improvisées des gouvernorats de Gizeh et du Caire. Environ 60 % de la population du Grand Caire vit en effet dans des zones d’habitation improvisées, surpeuplées, privées de services de base et d’infrastructures sociales. Leurs habitants souffrent en outre de la pollution de l’environnement.  Cette réunion avait pour objectif de rassembler tous les partenaires du développement jouant un rôle  essentiel dans la réussite du Programme de développement participatif dans les zones urbaines (PDP,Participatory Development Programme) – financé par l’UE – et de mettre en place un comité de pilotage qui se réunira régulièrement pour suivre l’état d’avancement du programme. PDP est un programme de coopération égypto-allemand qui vise à améliorer les conditions de vie des populations urbaines pauvres du Grand Caire – en particulier des jeunes et des femmes. Ce programme, cofinancé par l’Union européenne à hauteur de 20 millions d’euros, vise à améliorer les conditions environnementales et les services assurés par l’administration publique et les organisations de la société civile au bénéfice de 1,9 million de personnes vivant dans les zones ciblées par l’intervention.
enpi.info.euPlus : http://enpi-info.eu/medportal/news/latest/32541/%C3%89gypte:-l%E2%80%99UE-finance-un-projet-pour-am%C3%A9liorer-les-conditions-de-vie-dans-la-r%C3%A9gion-du-Grand-Caire
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The state of urban planning and informal areas after the Egyptian Revolution

The state of urban planning and informal areas after the Egyptian Revolution | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Steven Viney / Egypt independent 

Informal areas have largely been responsible for absorbing most of Egypt’s growing urban population for the past 30 years. But most Cairenes didn’t notice these areas — or ashweyat, as the areas with red-brick buildings and narrow, unpaved streets are loosely called — until the Ring Road was built around the formal city limits about 10 years ago.

The road exposed neighborhoods that many residents had never seen before, showing them for the first time that formal Cairo had been completely surrounded by kilometer after kilometer of informal building.

Urban planners now estimate that about 75 percent of those living in greater Cairo live in informal areas, yet they remain unrecognized by state institutions and have not been drawn on official maps. To tackle the issue, three international programs held the first in a series of workshops Monday to better understand the issue and bring together various stakeholders.

A number of urban planners, government representatives, academics and NGOs attended Monday’s workshop, sponsored by the French-funded research center CEDEJ, German development company GIZ, and the United Nations’ human settlements program UN-Habitat.

One of its main concerns was to examine what has been happening in greater Cairo’s informal areas since the 25 January revolution. Data collected by renowned urban planners David Sims and Dina Shehayeb seem to suggest informal areas have been growing at almost twice to four times the rate as before.

Various attempts to divert this rapid growth have largely failed. Most notably, Cairo’s satellite cities — which cost billions of pounds to build — have only absorbed a fraction of the city’s growth due to their distance from downtown Cairo and lack of transportation services. No alternative housing can seem to compete with the needs-based minimalism by which these informal areas, buildings and communities continue to be constructed.

Technically, these structures are illegal. Those who build these red-brick buildings usually don’t own the land, nor do they have building licenses, and most of them are built on valuable agricultural land.

But little can be done to prevent the massive growth, aside from a relatively rare forced eviction or demolition, to the point that formal Cairo now represents the minority of the urban population. Politicians rarely discuss this growth, however, and continue to boast about the city as if it were mostly formal.

That fact may leave some wondering: What is Cairo, if not an informal organism altogether? And why is it not a bigger part of the national dialogue after the revolution?

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/state-urban-planning-and-informal-areas-after-egyptian-revolution

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Cairo governor promises to improve slum conditions in Maspero

Cairo governor promises to improve slum conditions in Maspero | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Cairo Governor Osama Kamal said Wednesday that residents of a poor neighborhood in Maspero will not be forcibly removed from their homes to make way for luxury developments.Instead, authorities are researching ways of improving the living conditions of the Ramlet Bulaq community.

We are studying the development of the area and the funding of 64 large apartment buildings for the resettlement of the residents, he said. And we are starting in three months.The governor also said he had ordered his council to find housing for 40 families now homeless after several buildings in Ramlet Bulaq were demolished due to safety concerns.Kamal said the government owns some of the land around the community and is working to develop new homes for residents with the help of private firms and individuals.

We are talking to them to form a joint company to build new housing units in the area, he said.Ramlet Bulaq residents had blocked the Nil Corniche road just north of downtown Cairo Tuesday evening, protesting the demolition and demanding a meeting with Kamal.

The government is hoping to purchase land in Ramlet Bulaq to build luxury office buildings. However, residents have refused to leave unless they receive alternative housing.Maspero is home to several iconic buildings including the Foreign Ministry, the Radio and Television Union building and the Italian Consulate.

 

This text is from Al-Masry Al-Youm

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Upgrading Urban Egypt

Upgrading Urban Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Transport, potable water, electricity and sewage networks in Cairo and across Egypt are in desperate need of development and upgrading. While some recent accidents have highlighted the poor state of this network—take for example the numerous train accidents in recent months and their high human cost—the state has turned a blind eye and because of the lack of accountability and the current political uncertainty no long or short term solutions to such fundamental infrastructural problems have been initiated.

The spectrum of political parties on the scene since Egypt’s 2011 uprising has not demonstrated any serious engagement with physical infrastructural needs of Egyptian cities in their political programs. The present situation, however, is alarming, and while the Mubarak regime carried out infrastructure project haphazardly lacking a comprehensive vision, this approach to governance and building cannot be afforded in the years to come.

 

Although the level and accessibility of basic services in Cairo is remarkable for a city its size, especially considering the minimal investment and development of infrastructure, a crisis is approaching. Not only has pressure on existing systems been continuously increased, entire new areas have developed in recent years in a process of real estate speculation that has produced millions of uninhabited square meters of residential space in the interstitial spaces between the core city and desert extensions. Desert cities also exert a new pressure on infrastructure systems, which have been planned in a way that favors these new low-density (and primarily wealthy) areas with a high margin for waste, particularly in water systems. Additionally these new cities lack a fundamental infrastructural component: transport. What will happen when these thousands of currently empty apartments and houses in these new satellite neighborhoods are occupied with families? These car-dependent residents will exert a huge amount of pressure on the Cairo’s road network as they drive from far-flung desert cities, accessible only by car.

In addition, massive swaths of self-built districts on previously agricultural land largely rely on infrastructure that was not designed for dense urban areas (.....)

 

More on: http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/CairoReview/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=312


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The politics of neglect in post-Mubarak Cairo

The politics of neglect in post-Mubarak Cairo | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The politics of neglect which has long governed Cairo's expansive informal spaces looks set to remain well into the post-Mubarak era.

 

Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood backed government of President Mohamed Morsi face a difficult Spring. In the absence of external intervention and financial credit, Egypt’s hard currency reserves, necessary to fund essential imports of food and energy, are likely to be exhausted by March/April. (...)

 

A variety of commentators have noted the paralysis and drift of state institutions, especially the armed forces and elements of the security services which remain on the sidelines in the current stand-off, seeking to consolidate their autonomy from both Egypt’s elected leaders and Egyptian society.

While the Cairo “street” has been relatively quiet since the Canal Cities protests in late January, a variety of local observers have nonetheless noted fears of growing ungovernability and the possibility of mass protests triggered by deteriorating economic conditions (...)

 

Urban interventions

(...). There is little evidence of Soviet town planning in Cairo. Egypt’s elites have historically looked to Paris and Britain — not Moscow — for their inspiration.

 

To understand Cairo’s current problematics of infrastructure, but also its successes, you need also to consider the substantial western presence in urban development since the 1970s (.....)


Cairo's splinter
While the Nasser government’s nationalist state-building project is sometimes represented as having returned the capital to its indigenous inhabitants, in fact formal urban development since the 1950s largely benefited regime-linked constituencies. Despite construction of some highly subsidized ‘popular’ housing and middle- to upper-income sub-divisions, the general expansion of the existing city had largely stopped by the mid 1960s, inflating urban land and thus housing prices.(...)

A politics of neglect and urban expansion
Although its local government system has been aptly described as “designed for dictatorship,” the Egyptian state seemed unable to halt the informal urbanization process. (...)

 

The failures of western development

Perhaps the only serious effort to address Cairo’s problematics of growth were undertaken by western and multilateral donors — concerned with the vulnerability of the Sadat government (...). However such projects were largely unsuccessful in part because they clashed directly with the ‘politics of neglect’. For their part, the Sadat and Mubarak governments were primarily concerned with foreign funding for the (extremely expensive and highly uneconomic) free-standing new desert cities (...) 

Informal Cairo and revolution
While the role of informal Cairo in the 2011 Mubarak overthrow is sometimes contested, the ‘revolution’ indisputably led to its increased expansion especially in largely unserviced peri-urban areas some distance from the historic centre. (...) Cairo’s particular problems are not fundamentally those of neo-liberalism but rather of a neglectful and autocratic political order. However, the continuities between the Mubarak and post-Mubarak eras are striking.
Egypt-actus's insight:

During the caretaker transition governments, ministers announced plans for a highly subsidized $5 billion housing programme to be funded by foreign donors — none of whom were forthcoming.

 

The Cairo 2050 plan was not abandoned, and indeed shows signs of being resurrected by the Morsi government.

 

The new constitution — passed in last year’s highly polarizing referendum — puts off local government reform. Parasitical ancient regime officials remain on the ground, now joined by the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice party cadres seeking to penetrate local government and society in the manner of the Mubarak-era National Democratic party.

 

While the revolution triggered a wave of urban activism in Egyptian civil society and a host of interesting grass-roots initiatives, sadly the state and political order remain largely impermeable, reinforcing the frequently expressed sense of disappointment that the Mubarak overthrow has done so little for ordinary Egyptians. Neither the Morsi government nor any other political actors are likely to take up substantive issues of Cairo’s governance while struggles for control of the state and political authority are ongoing.

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Les immeubles illégaux prolifèrent en Egypte

Les immeubles illégaux prolifèrent en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
En Egypte à Alexandrie, au moins vingt-cinq personnes ont trouvé la mort et douze autres ont été blessées dans l’effondrement d’un immeuble pourtant de construction récente. La seconde ville du pays, construite sur un sol instable est également bâtie sur une zone sismique. Toute l'Egypte, cependant, est touchée par un phénomène de constructions illégales.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Par Alexandre Buccianti/RFI


« Appartement construit légalement avant 2011. » Cette phrase est devenue presque obligatoire dans toutes les annonces immobilières d’Alexandrie. Les promoteurs ont, en effet, profité de l’effondrement de l’appareil de l’Etat après la révolution pour multiplier les constructions illégales. Près de 11 000 immeubles ont été érigés sans permis, sans contrôle, n’importe comment et n’importe où dans cette ville.

Il est vrai que toute l’Egypte a connu le même phénomène avec plus de 200 000 immeubles illégaux. Mais le danger est plus grand à Alexandrie du fait des intempéries et de la nature sablonneuse ou marécageuse du sol. Il ne faut pas, non plus, oublier les séismes fréquents qui ont déjà détruit une partie de la ville d’Alexandre le Grand.

A l’impuissance et au laxisme des fonctionnaires, il faut ajouter les failles juridiques. Il suffit qu’un immeuble illégal soit habité, ne serait-ce que par une personne, pour que les autorités ne puissent pas le démolir. Comme quoi, le romancier égyptien Albert Cossery était visionnaire quand il écrivit, il y a 70 ans, son opus intitulé La maison de la mort certaine.

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Another Look at Cairo: Mohamed ElShahed at TEDxCairo 2012

Mohamed El Shahed is the founder and editor of http://Cairobserver.com , a blog dedicated to the city's architecture, urbanism, city life and cultural heritage.He is a doctoral candidate in the Middle East Studies Department at New York University. His research focuses on architecture and urban planning in Egypt from the 19th century to the present.

In his TEDxCairo talk, Mohamed takes us on a virtual subway tour around Cairo, encouraging the citizens of Cairo to pay better attention to the minute details that reflect the policies that affect their lives on a daily basis and to take a more active part in the decision making process.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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