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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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President Morsi to honour 37 scientists on Science Day - Politics - Egypt - Ahram Online

President Morsi to honour 37 scientists on Science Day - Politics - Egypt - Ahram Online | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Achievements of 37 Egyptian scientists to be recognised by President Mohamed Morsi at a ceremony marking National Science Day. President Mohamed Morsi will honour 37 Egyptian scientists at an event marking National Science Day on Thursday, state news agency MENA reports.

 

The scientists have all been awarded the Nile Award or the Egyptian State Award between 2009 and 2011.

The event will be at the Cairo International Conference Centre under the auspices of the scientific research ministry

It is the first time in three years the day has been celebrated.

 

http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/68972.aspx

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Ancient paint used to decorate Pharoahs' tombs is set to be the basis of telecommunication devices

Ancient paint used to decorate Pharoahs' tombs is set to be the basis of telecommunication devices | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptian blue was first used 5,000 years ago in the Fourth Dynasty

 

New research shows it could be used in state-of-the-art gadgetsIt can be rolled into sheets so thin thousands would fit across a human hair

 

And it produces infra-red radiation like that used by TV remotes 

 

Considered humanity's first synthetic pigment, Egyptian blue was used by the Egyptians for thousands of years.

 

 

The term for it in the Egyptian language is hsbd-iryt, which means artificial lapis lazuli, revealing the ancients obsession with the precious stone, which they prized for its rarity and stark blue colour.

Its characteristic blue colour, resulting from one of its main components — copper — ranges from a light to a dark hue, depending on differential processing and composition.

The earliest evidence for the use of Egyptian blue is in the Fourth Dynasty (c.2575-2467 BC) and in the Middle Kingdom (2050-1652 BC), it continued to be in the decoration of tombs, wall paintings, furnishings and statues

By the New Kingdom (1570–1070 BC), Egyptian blue began to be more widely used in the production of numerous objects.

The pigment was known to the Romans by the name caeruleum. Vitruvius describes in his work De architectura how it was produced by grinding sand, copper and natron and heating the mixture, shaped into small balls, in a furnace. 

Lime is necessary for the production as well, but probably lime-rich sand was used. 

After the Roman era, Egyptian Blue fell from usage and the manner of its creation was forgotten. (Mail Online)

 

More : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2282993/How-Ancient-Egypts-synthetic-pigment-set-enjoy-renaissance-high-tech-nanomaterial.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

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