Égypt-actus
Follow
Find tag "loi"
381.0K views | +42 today
Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
Curated by Egypt-actus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

No Fear: Mursi’s rule of law

No Fear: Mursi’s rule of law | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Why should I respect the judges? My own president doesn’t.
[Protestor, Port Said]

As though anyone needed another reminder. As though anyone had not quite received the message when prisons were stormed in Port Said, after the judges pronounced a suspicious verdict. As though anyone had not realised that the institutions of Egypt are being weakened – and Egyptian citizens would pay the price if they were weakened further. Yet, after the Administrative Court of Egypt cancelled the parliamentary elections due to begin next month, it seems that many do indeed need that reminder. The question is – how many reminders will it take?

Under now deposed president Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian state had its pillars. One of them was brought down in the January 25th uprising – the ‘pillar of fear’. Regardless of the botched nature of this transition, the Egyptian revolution has accomplished at least one thing – it has ripped to shreds the curtain of fear.

That, no-one can deny, was a good thing. However, there is a corollary to consider here – if the ‘pillar of fear’ was so strong in Mubarak’s Egypt, then what has filled in the void that it used to occupy? Or did it not serve a purpose to begin with?

The reality is – it did serve a purpose, by creating a purpose. When a state apparatus is so absolute, and fear is so prevalent, it does ensure that individuals do not step out of certain predefined norms. In countries where such an apparatus does not exist, something else fills in that void. Civil society institutions; respect between the state and the citizen; a social contract; and so forth.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Filling the void

When the pillar disappeared, a void did emerge – and in the last two years, no one in Egypt’s ruling elite has tried to fill it. The military council that governed Egypt for 18 months was uninterested in doing so – it left it empty, and it left the other institutions alone. Neither was satisfactory – the state’s institutions needed to be reformed after the revolutionary uprising, not left to their own devices. This is particularly the case if fear, which animated so much of Egyptian society prior to the uprising, was no longer the tool of the state.

 

More on: http://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/2013/03/10/No-Fear-Mursi-s-rule-of-law.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egyptian civil society see echoes of past in new law

Egyptian civil society see echoes of past in new law | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A law drafted by the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice (FJP) party threatens to stifle Egyptian civil society and takes a cue from the authoritarian ways of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak, rights groups said.

The draft law, due to be presented to Egypt's temporary legislature the Shura Council, places tight restrictions on the funding of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), a problem which plagued civil society groups in Mubarak's days.

  

 

Raising further alarm, civil society groups have pointed to a recent government letter instructing a leading human rights group not to engage with foreign organizations without the permission of the security apparatus.

It is reminiscent of the tight restrictions that stifled civil society in Mubarak's day, leading to the imprisonment of some prominent activists. Last year, under the generals who assumed power from Mubarak, 19 American pro-democracy activists faced prosecution under the same laws. They were charged with receiving foreign funds illegally.

 

The draft NGO law follows another from the Islamist-led administration that was criticized for being authoritarian, giving the state too much power to stifle dissent.

 

The latest draft law prevents any organization from receiving funds from foreign individuals or groups or Egyptians living abroad without the permission of the authorities. It appears to be more restrictive than an earlier draft that was discussed in 2012 in the Muslim Brotherhood-led parliament before it was dissolved by a court order.

 

"It's once again a reflection of a general sense of paranoia when it comes to human rights and democracy," said Heba Morayef, Egypt Director of Human Rights Watch. "When you compare this draft law to the one submitted early last year, you see a shift in approach."

 

FOILING PLOTS

Mokhtar al-Ashry, head of the FJP's legal committee, said restrictions on sources of foreign funding were needed to stop Egypt's enemies hatching plots against the country and preventing money laundering.

 

More on: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/25/us-egypt-ngos-idUSBRE91O0TZ20130225?feedType=RSS&feedName=worldNews

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt’s Salafist Nour Party pushes for better minimum wage

Egypt’s Salafist Nour Party pushes for better minimum wage | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt’s Salafist Nour Party submitted a draft law on wages to the upper house of parliament, the Shura Council, through party members Salah Abdel Mabood and Ahmed Youssef on Monday.

The Shura Council will open the discussion over the draft law on Wednesday, Al-Ahram's Arabic-language website reported.

 

Under the terms of the draft legislation, the minimum wage would reach LE1200 ($178) per month and it would cover workers in the public and private sectors, whether permanent or temporary.

According to the draft law, the Egyptian supreme council of wages will be assigned to revise the wage caps every three years.

The maximum wage should not exceed 35 times the minimum wage and violations will face legal punishment.

Since the January uprising in 2011, successive interim governments have promised to impose wage caps to meet one of the key demands of the revolution, social justice.

 

In June 2011,Egypt's then transitional government granted public servants a monthly minimum wage of LE700 ($120).

 

The minimum wage was supposed to come into effect at the start of July, the beginning of the 2011-2012 financial year, but in reality was only implemented for government employees on permanent contracts

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Mission d’assistance de l’Union Interparlementaire en Egypte sur la révision de la loi électorale

Mission d’assistance de l’Union Interparlementaire en Egypte sur la révision de la loi électorale | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

(APO)/ – Une mission d’experts de l’UIP va travailler avec les autorités égyptiennes à la révision de la loi régissant les élections législatives en vue des élections à la Chambre basse du Parlement qui doivent se tenir dans les prochaines semaines.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Cette mission (13-14 janvier) s’inscrit dans le cadre de l’appui que l’UIP apporte à l’Egypte pour l’aider à édifier une société démocratique.

Une équipe d’experts spécialisés dans les processus électoraux et la participation politique des femmes, ainsi qu’un parlementaire du Royaume-Uni, dispenseront des conseils sur un large éventail de sujets. Il s’agit notamment de la mise en place des dispositifs les plus efficaces possibles pour élire davantage de femmes au Parlement égyptien. En effet, l’Egypte ne compte actuellement que 15 femmes parlementaires, soit 2,0 pour cent de l’effectif total.

Ce pays arabe est doté d’un système mixte de représentation proportionnelle et de scrutin majoritaire uninominal à un tour pour l’élection des parlementaires. Quotas et sièges réservés sont généralement les instruments les plus efficaces pour assurer un parlement plus représentatif.

Le Parlement égyptien a entrepris la révision de la loi régissant les élections législatives, qui devra être parachevée dans les prochaines semaines, après qu’une nouvelle Constitution eut été adoptée le mois dernier.

La loi révisée devra être assortie d’autres mesures propres à assurer une participation accrue des femmes à la vie politique. On citera en particulier les campagnes de sensibilisation des citoyens sur le vote en faveur des femmes, la formation des femmes candidates aux méthodes de campagne électorale et la couverture médiatique des candidates lors des réunions électorales.

Bahreïn, Maldives et RDC au programme du Comité des droits de l’homme des parlementaires de l’UIP qui se réunit la semaine prochaine – Les violations des droits de l’homme de parlementaires à Bahreïn, aux Maldives et en République démocratique du Congo (RDC), voilà entre autres les cas sur lesquels se penchera le Comité des droits de l’homme des parlementaires, qui se réunit du 14 au 18 janvier.

Cette session permettra au Comité d’entendre les autorités parlementaires de Bahreïn sur le dossier de Matar Ebrahim Matar et de Jawad Fairuz Ghuloom, qui auraient fait l’objet d’arrestations et de détentions arbitraires, ainsi que de mauvais traitements. M. Ghuloom fait partie des 31 militants de l’opposition qui se sont vus déchoir de la nationalité bahreïnite au mois de novembre.

Cette audition fait suite à une résolution que l’UIP a adoptée à sa 127ème Assemblée, à Québec, au mois d’octobre, et dans laquelle elle se disait préoccupée par les efforts déployés pour étouffer l’opposition et s’inquiétait de ce que personne n’ait eu à rendre de comptes au sujet des mauvais traitements qui auraient été infligés aux deux parlementaires.

Le Comité des droits de l’homme des parlementaires s’intéressera également aux conclusions d’une mission de droits de l’homme que l’UIP a dépêchée aux Maldives en novembre dernier, pour réunir des preuves directes au sujet des allégations de mauvais traitements, de détention et de harcèlement à l’encontre de 19 parlementaires de l’opposition. Il s’est déjà dit préoccupé que la violence politique et l’intimidation de parlementaires n’aient pas cessé depuis le début de la crise politique en février 2012, et que les responsables n’aient pas été poursuivis.

Cet organe de protection des droits de l’homme s’interrogera aussi sur les mesures à prendre au sujet de deux parlementaires de l’opposition en République démocratique du Congo, MM. Eugène Diomi Ndongala et Pierre Jacques Chalupa. Il s’était dit vivement préoccupé par leur situation dans une résolution adoptée à l’Assemblée tenue par l’UIP à Québec, en octobre dernier.

Le Comité est actuellement saisi de 83 cas concernant 233 parlementaires de 39 pays, répartis sur l’ensemble des continents, qui portent sur des disparitions, des atteintes à la liberté d’expression, des cas de harcèlement, des accusations pénales à mobile politique, des arrestations illégales et des détentions arbitraires, parmi d’autres violations des droits de l’homme.

Le Comité des droits de l’homme des parlementaires de l’UIP fondé en 1976 doit également connaître d’un certain nombre de dossiers anciens et toujours non résolus portant notamment sur des cas de disparition de parlementaires au Bélarus, en Erythrée et au Rwanda. Enfin, il traite aussi de cas très médiatisés comme ceux de Sam Rainsy au Cambodge, d’Anwar Ibrahim en Malaisie, de Fawzia Koofi en Afghanistan ou de Jatuporn Prompan en Thaïlande

 

SOURCE 

International Press Institute (IPI)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Freedom and Justice Party: Rule of Law Must Prevail

Stressing that corrupt individuals are behind mindless violence in Egypt, the FJP urges all to maintain law and order.

 Dr. Murad Ali, Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) media adviser, said: Those who benefit from all the death and destruction, the riots and vandalism, are not simple citizens – workers, farmers or office clerks seeking for a decent life. Only corrupt individuals seeking to protect their misconduct and corruption benefit from ongoing thuggery and sabotage.


"Together, we made the great revolution to establish the rule of law, respect for the provisions of the judiciary, to ensure fair retribution. Regardless of acceptance or rejection of Saturday’s verdict, we must respect it. Legal process must be followed to challenge court rulings.


"I call on politicians, media professionals and members of the press to desist from frustrating the people and driving them to despair, using judicial verdicts to ignite the situation and drag the country to chaos and lawlessness. Everyone should reconsider their positions before it’s too late." (Ikhwan web)


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

The Silence of the Law

What does it mean to implement sharia today? Khaled Fahmy, professor and chair of the history department at AUC, tackles this question by examining Egypt's encounter with modernity in the nineteenth century and the origins of the Egyptian legal system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Brotherhood party proposes amendments to parliament law

Brotherhood party proposes amendments to parliament law | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) proposed amendments to the parliamentary elections law on Monday at a "national dialogue" meeting called by President Mohamed Mursi, said its chairman, Saad al-Katatni, on Tuesday. 

"I wish that all parties would rethink their positions and join us in confronting attempts to spread chaos and violence," Katatni said, adding that the purpose of the proposed amendments is to reduce tensions. 

Katatni insisted that all factions must rise above their ideological differences and put the safety and stability of the nation above all else.

"Our hands are reached out to everyone," he said in a post on the FJP's official Facebook page on Tuesday. 

Chairman of the Ghad al-Thawra Party, Ayman Noor, who also attended the meeting, said in a phone interview on a satellite channel on Monday that the amendments they discussed were to allow parliamentarians to change their status after being elected and to make it unnecessary for female candidates to be on top of electoral lists.

Meanwhile, Egypt's main opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front, had turned down Mursi's invitation for dialogue, describing it as "late" and "cosmetic". 

The president's call for dialogue came as an attempt to calm tensions that have risen in light of clashes that marked the second anniversary of the 2011 uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak.

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya
more...
No comment yet.